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Old 01-14-2017, 06:25 AM   #1
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Rabbit

Just seen a recipe on TV

They are cooking Rabbit. Never had it before and don't know what it tastes like.

Is it expensive, relative to chicken for example?

They say it is white meat. I say this only I have had a bit of a cnacer scare and told not to eat red meat.

I think it is more to do with processed food like a steak pie though.

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Old 01-14-2017, 06:35 AM   #2
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Unless they specified that the rabbit was wild, I believe what was being prepared was farm raised. Although I have never eaten rabbit, I know there is a big difference in taste between wild and domestic raised. Just like domestic, farm raise, hogs are very different tasting than wild hogs.
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Old 01-14-2017, 12:27 PM   #3
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It tastes just like chicken.
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:28 PM   #4
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I raised and slaughtered the domestic ones. Their meat has no flavor of it's own. Never eaten a wild killed one but I'm sure it has that "wild" flavor.
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:52 AM   #5
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I grew up eating a lot of rabbit (mostly wild, some domestic) and I don't find it tastes like chicken at all. It tastes like....well... rabbit.

Is it expensive? Well, that's all relative, I suppose. Around here, a 3 lb domestic rabbit goes for about $20-23. More expensive than chicken, but less than other meats.

Wild rabbit has a little bit of a gamey flavor, but it's not anything offensive. It's actually a very mild tasting meat. It doesn't have a lot of fat, though which makes it a good candidate for braising.

Two of my absolute favorite dishes are rabbit in mustard sauce and hasenpfeffer. My grandmother made good hasenpfeffer. I wish I had taken the time to get her recipe.
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Old 01-15-2017, 03:12 AM   #6
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...My grandmother made good hasenpfeffer. I wish I had taken the time to get her recipe.
Find a recipe that has a flavor profile that looks like what you remember, then play with it. I have a taste memory of my Dad's dill pickles. Found a decent looking recipe, then tweaked it until my taste buds said "This! This tastes like Dad's pickles!" I bet you could duplicate your taste memory of Grandma's hasenpferffer. It will make you all warm and happy inside.
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:21 AM   #7
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Hasenpfeffer looks a lot like sauerbraten, except for rabbit instead of beef. I really like the Frugel Gourmet's recipe for sauerbraten as it's not too sour. A couple of the recipes I looked at for hassenpfeffer have way more vinegar proportionally than FG's sauerbraten so not sure if I'd like them.

If your grandmother's hassenpfeffer wasn't too sour, I'd start with FG's sauerbraten recipe. I've been thinking about trying rabbit and maybe we'll give hassenpfeffer a go if Craig is willing.
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Old 01-15-2017, 11:03 AM   #8
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I prefer domestic rabbit if I fry or bbq it. I only use wild rabbit in soups and stews.

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Old 01-15-2017, 12:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I grew up eating a lot of rabbit (mostly wild, some domestic) and I don't find it tastes like chicken at all. It tastes like....well... rabbit.

Is it expensive? Well, that's all relative, I suppose. Around here, a 3 lb domestic rabbit goes for about $20-23. More expensive than chicken, but less than other meats.
Sarcasm Steve.
I can buy farm raised rabbits for $6 each. The guy raises them just a few minutes away. In fact I had forgotten about him and plan to go by there tomorrow.
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Old 01-18-2017, 05:31 PM   #10
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Meat from any mammal is red meat, so rabbit is red meat.
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Old 01-18-2017, 05:35 PM   #11
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I have never eaten rabbit, only snowshoe hare, which my ex used to snare. When we first starting eating it, I really like the flavour. By the end of winter we were pretty tired of it and its lack of fat. We cooked a lot of bunny curries, because the hot spices hid a lot of the bunny flavour. Snowshoe vindalou was my favourite.
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Old 01-19-2017, 11:29 AM   #12
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Rabbit is very popular in Italy and there are many recipes for cooking it. It's considered a delicacy and can be cooked in many different ways, varying from whole to divided into small joints. Personally I really enjoy it very much, however the way of cooking it that I prefer the most is the way they cook it is in the Canary Islands, where they do breaded rabbit cutlets from the saddle, with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar - very yummy, in my opinion.

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Old 01-20-2017, 09:34 AM   #13
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Rabbit is popular here in Quebec, only I would hazard to say more so in the countryside where they would catch/shoot wild rabbits. Also they, like Jon, probably braise/stew them.

Domestic Rabbit at the grocers, goes for about $10.00 a pound. Which to my mind puts it in the same price range as duck. Their average weight is 3 lb which will feed 2 to 3 people.

Whole Chicken this week is $4.30 a lb. (average weight under 2 k)
Drumsticks - $4.20 a lb.
Thighs - $7.70 ...
Half Chicken - $2.50 ... on special this week! woo-hoo! saving $1.20
Cutlets (probably without the tenders) - $8.99 also on special from $10.20
Ground Chicken - $7.00

The above is this weeks pricing from one of our grocers web-sites.
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Old 01-20-2017, 09:47 AM   #14
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Wow, Dragnlaw, even allowing for the currency differences, those are high prices for chicken!
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:40 AM   #15
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They are but keep in mind there are always a lot of specials on. Some of those prices were the premium pre-packaged from big name suppliers.

Example, same store had the "Exceldor" 5 Drumsticks per tray, avg price/weight is $4.90/530gr. = $9.24 k, $4.19 lb.

Their own pkgs are 5 drumsticks per tray, avg price/weight is $3.96/530gr. = $7.47 k, 3.39 lb.

The thighs price I had were only from the Exceldor line, with 8 thighs per tray and averaging 450 gr. (1 lb) Average price $7.65.
There wasn't a price from their own pkgs listed, probably at least $1.00 cheaper thou.

I usually buy "Family Packs" and even then only on special. I also buy the whole legs, cut them up into drumsticks and thighs. Half the thighs I de-bone and skin. I pack all into sandwich bags, 3 (or 4) per and toss into bigger bags and then to the freezer. Backs go into soup pot.

Boneless skinless chicken breast - when they come on a super special, often up to 7 huge breasts, I'll buy 3 or more pkgs (average price from 10 to 12$). I package them in sandwich bags as well - super large single packs, smaller ones two per pack. Super large I pull off the tenders and pkg them about 250 gr. per. Use those for stir fry.
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:48 AM   #16
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We see whole chickens for $0.99/Lb on sale to $1.39/Lb USD. Applying the current exchange rate, that's 1.32 CAD to 1.85 CAD. Similar differences for parts.

These prices are for regular chickens. Organic/kosher/other special chickens are higher.
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:53 AM   #17
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Think I highjacked the thread on Rabbits.... sorry!!

but... that being said, I remember once a camping trip to Malone with friends who frequently went there. He took us to a local butcher shop where he consistently bought their chickens at a price we could never match in Canada.

He asked the butcher to show us the packaging his chickens came in...

"PRODUCT OF CANADA"
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Old 01-20-2017, 10:58 AM   #18
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I do also have a couple of recipes for Rabbit. I've only done them with chicken and they are not too bad.

Let me know if anyone is interested and I will post them.

Roast Rabbit in a Dried Fruit Sauce (roast)
Rabbit with marjoram and vegetables (braise)
Rabbit with White Wine and Mushrooms (braise and yummy)
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Old 01-20-2017, 11:41 AM   #19
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I raised and slaughtered the domestic ones. Their meat has no flavor of it's own. Never eaten a wild killed one but I'm sure it has that "wild" flavor.
"Farmed" rabbit doesn't taste of much but wild rabbit has a more defined flavour. It's often described as a "stronger version of chicken" but having said that, it depends on the age of the rabbit. It has a slightly sweet, vaguely gamey flavour and a pleasant texture. It isn't as strong tasting as other game such as venison.

Rabbits are generally sold whole, skinned and gutted – if you can’t quite overcome your squeamishness, ask the butcher to joint one for you. Joints of rabbit include loins, legs, rib, belly, neck, shoulder and saddle, and the kidneys are delicious. Wild rabbits are often soaked in cold water for 3 hours to whiten the flesh. I don't generally bother with this but each to his own.

One thing to watch out for - the shot lodged in the flesh if it's a wild rabbit - not good for you! Look out for plump, pink rabbits that smell nice and fresh. If the rabbit has the head on, check the eyes - they should be bright and clear. Rabbits with bruised flesh or a lot of lead shot damage should be avoided - the meat will have an unpleasant bitter flavour. If the rabbits still have the kidneys in, check to make sure they have a good amount of white fat surrounding them - this indicates a younger, healthy rabbit that has had plenty of food throughout its life.

There has been a lot in the press here about inhumane conditions that farmed rabbits are kept in. A lot of farmed rabbit meat in Britain comes from China - 'nuff said! It's probably better, if you can find wild rabbits in your butchers, to choose them.
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Old 01-20-2017, 11:49 AM   #20
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I've used this Jamie Oliver recipe for Rabbit stew. It's very good.

Wild rabbit stew | Jamie Oliver
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