"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-11-2015, 12:27 PM   #1
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,904
Best Bean Soup I've Ever Made

Ok, I know, bean soup is a very easy soup to make. But you have to understand, me being who I am, I often overcomplicate things. I'm always experimenting. For this soup, I kept it very simple and it came out way good. So, I'm just putting in this recipe to remind everyone how good food can be, without a lot of fuss. Enjoy.

Ingredients: (All Beans were purchased pre-cooked from the supermarket)
48 oz. pinto beans
15 oz. black beans
15 oz. dark red kidney beans
1 large onion, rough dice
1 very good hot dog, quartered and sliced
8 strips of bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 cup water
1/4 cup milk
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper.

Fry the bacon, until half done (this isn't supposed to be crispy bacon), add the onion and pepper. When the onion is just beginning to soften, add the beans. let simmer for ten minutes. Add the salt, water, and milk. Simmer for thirty minutes to let the flavors distribute. Taste, correct the seasonings, and serve.

Like I said, this was a very simple bean soup. And it was very tasty. The leftover beans can now be used to make baked beans, or refried beans, or a really good batch of chili, or put into some other kind of soup, used for lunches at work. I might even talk myself into serving up a bowl for a late night snack, with some good cheddar grated over the top.

Occasionally, just once in a great while, life doesn't have to be so complicated. I have too many other things to complicate my days and nights right now.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 02:18 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,343
That sounds great, Chief, and very easy to make a big batch. I love bean with bacon soup. I don't know why it never occurred to me to make it at home.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 02:28 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
FoodieFanatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Portland
Posts: 351
Soup is the greatest thing and it is almost soup season (Hooray!). I make Black Bean soup, even going so far as soaking the beans. Your recipe, Chief, sounds really good! I may have to give it try but I'll wait until it isn't 95 degrees outside! I'm so ready for rain.
FoodieFanatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 02:49 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 10,088
Sounds good, Chief. I love bean soups. Sometimes I'll remove some of the beans and mash them, then add back in for a little thicker texture.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 04:41 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
FoodieFanatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Portland
Posts: 351
I do that as well. Gives a nice texture to the soup.
FoodieFanatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 09:01 PM   #6
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,711
Love Bean Soup!!! Come on cold weather!!!
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2015, 09:55 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
FoodieFanatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Portland
Posts: 351
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Love Bean Soup!!! Come on cold weather!!!
Me, too! I bought bags of black, pinto beans and split peas this week. A local grocery is closing so they had everything marked way down. Can't go wrong with having these on hand. A pantry staple.
FoodieFanatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 06:27 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Ok, I know, bean soup is a very easy soup to make. But you have to understand, me being who I am, I often overcomplicate things. I'm always experimenting. For this soup, I kept it very simple and it came out way good. So, I'm just putting in this recipe to remind everyone how good food can be, without a lot of fuss. Enjoy.

Ingredients: (All Beans were purchased pre-cooked from the supermarket)
48 oz. pinto beans
15 oz. black beans
15 oz. dark red kidney beans
1 large onion, rough dice
1 very good hot dog, quartered and sliced
8 strips of bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 cup water
1/4 cup milk
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper.

Fry the bacon, until half done (this isn't supposed to be crispy bacon), add the onion and pepper. When the onion is just beginning to soften, add the beans. let simmer for ten minutes. Add the salt, water, and milk. Simmer for thirty minutes to let the flavors distribute. Taste, correct the seasonings, and serve.

Like I said, this was a very simple bean soup. And it was very tasty. The leftover beans can now be used to make baked beans, or refried beans, or a really good batch of chili, or put into some other kind of soup, used for lunches at work. I might even talk myself into serving up a bowl for a late night snack, with some good cheddar grated over the top.

Occasionally, just once in a great while, life doesn't have to be so complicated. I have too many other things to complicate my days and nights right now.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks, Chief, for another good, usable recipe. A couple of questions: your note of pre-cooked means canned beans, right? I've heard that canned beans are equal in every way to dried beans cooked in the kitchen. I've also heard that people rinse and drain cooked beans before adding them to a recipe. When I used canned beans in chili, for example, I include the liquid. Are the beans in this recipe rinsed and drained? Does draining affect the saltiness? And is leftover soup freezable in zip baggies? Thank you for sharing your expertise with us.
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 07:07 AM   #9
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
Thanks, Chief, for another good, usable recipe. A couple of questions: your note of pre-cooked means canned beans, right? I've heard that canned beans are equal in every way to dried beans cooked in the kitchen. I've also heard that people rinse and drain cooked beans before adding them to a recipe. When I used canned beans in chili, for example, I include the liquid. Are the beans in this recipe rinsed and drained? Does draining affect the saltiness? And is leftover soup freezable in zip baggies? Thank you for sharing your expertise with us.
Draining and rinsing does reduce the salt content of the beans. But I find the dissolved soluble fiber in the can liquor desirable, and that same liquid has flavor. for soup, or chili, I just dump it in. If I'm using the beans for something like three-bean salad, or as a side dish, I drain and rinse. And yes, canned beans are pretty much the same in flavor and texture as home-cooked bans.

That being said, I much prefer to cook other legumes, such as split peas, and lentils from scratch. The only thing with canned beans is that if you get cheap brands, sometimes they can pick up a metallic flavor. Factory cooked beans that have been bottled have never given me an off flavor.

Dried beans are great because they are easy to store, and are more condensed in space than are their canned cousins. They are also lightler in weight. A bin full of dried legumes is a lot more food than is a bin full of canned, or bottled legumes.

As for the saltiness of canned beans, simply add less salt when seasoning the pot. You can also purchase canned and bottle beans that are salt free.

Seeeeeeya; chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 10:08 AM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Tacoma
Posts: 279
I buy the low sodium Bush beans but keep dried in the pantry because I love doing the process and feels like I'd doing something health. lol

What do you consider a good hot dog? I find them all too salty and like them best grilled over charcoal.
Lance Bushrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 10:11 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Butter beans and ham hocks. Very comforting on a cold winter's night.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 11:04 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Tacoma
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Butter beans and ham hocks. Very comforting on a cold winter's night.
When I lived in WV I could get #300 cans of butter beans, now I'm lucky to find a #3 can and when I do the are way over a dollar; beans, ramps, ham hocks and corn bread were a favorite. The way i used to do it was like soup.
Lance Bushrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 12:06 PM   #13
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Bushrod View Post
I buy the low sodium Bush beans but keep dried in the pantry because I love doing the process and feels like I'd doing something health. lol

What do you consider a good hot dog? I find them all too salty and like them best grilled over charcoal.
I found a brand out of Wisconsin call Cher-Make. They are encased in a natural casing, and have a light, smoky flavor that isn't nearly as salty as most. The flavor is very good. They have an online presence. I believe they can be ordered. They're carried at one of our local supermarkets. They also make other kinds of sausages and products as well.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 12:07 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
My second husband was a dyed in the wool WV hillbilly. Right down to clog dancing. Oh how he loved his beans and ham hocks. I once called his mother and asked her about some of his favorite dishes. Got out my JOC and tried to find as many of them as I could. It is true. The way to a man's heart, is through his stomach.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 12:46 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,008
Thank you, Chief. I appreciate your clear and thorough answers.
Bean Appetit!
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2015, 02:39 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I found a brand out of Wisconsin call Cher-Make. They are encased in a natural casing, and have a light, smoky flavor that isn't nearly as salty as most. The flavor is very good. They have an online presence. I believe they can be ordered. They're carried at one of our local supermarkets. They also make other kinds of sausages and products as well.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
We have a plant here just four or less minutes away from where I live. Kayem's. There are two sides to their plant. Strictly Kosher and non Kosher. They make hot dogs that are Kosher. I always buy a ten pound box. Then I have to put most of them in the freezer so I won't eat them all at once.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 02:53 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,466
I kinda did a similar take on this...but I started with two fresh pork hocks. I had been wanting to try "stove top smoking" so I lined a SS wok that I got at the Thrift Store with foil, put some pecan wood in the bottom, lit that, put a rack on top and put 2 fresh pork hocks that I seasoned with S&P and chipolte (sp) pepper. Made sure top was sealed tightly, and let it smoke away for about 25 minutes. In the meantime, I put chopped up parsnips, fresh thyme, garlic, onion, carrots, and more seasonings in a stock pot. Dug out some chicken chipolte sausage out of the freezer, tossed that in. Added beef stock. And then tossed the smoked hocks in. Cooked that for about 2 hours until the meat fell off the bones. Removed the bones, added chickpeas, cabbage, and some sauerkraut, a bit of fish sauce, a jar of tomatoes from the garden. Adjusted the seasoning. Added some grated lemon zest. It was delish. I was really happy with the stove top smoking experiment. Meant to add a vanilla bean but forgot that. I did have to adjust the foil on the outside of the pan...smoke was leaking out. Definitely want to make sure that there is a tight seal when you do this.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
https://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 04:26 PM   #18
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I kinda did a similar take on this...but I started with two fresh pork hocks. I had been wanting to try "stove top smoking" so I lined a SS wok that I got at the Thrift Store with foil, put some pecan wood in the bottom, lit that, put a rack on top and put 2 fresh pork hocks that I seasoned with S&P and chipolte (sp) pepper. Made sure top was sealed tightly, and let it smoke away for about 25 minutes. In the meantime, I put chopped up parsnips, fresh thyme, garlic, onion, carrots, and more seasonings in a stock pot. Dug out some chicken chipolte sausage out of the freezer, tossed that in. Added beef stock. And then tossed the smoked hocks in. Cooked that for about 2 hours until the meat fell off the bones. Removed the bones, added chickpeas, cabbage, and some sauerkraut, a bit of fish sauce, a jar of tomatoes from the garden. Adjusted the seasoning. Added some grated lemon zest. It was delish. I was really happy with the stove top smoking experiment. Meant to add a vanilla bean but forgot that. I did have to adjust the foil on the outside of the pan...smoke was leaking out. Definitely want to make sure that there is a tight seal when you do this.
Sounds way-good. I didn't think to add carrot or tomato.

Seeeeya Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 06:59 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,429
OK, so I have to ask. If we're starting with beans right out of the bag, then they have to soak overnight, right?

Do you have any recommendations about doing this in the crock pot? I make refried beans in my crockpot by adding 8 cups of chicken broth to 16oz of pinto beans (along with some spices and stuff) and cooking on high for about 8 hours. The beans turn brown and the broth gets thick and brothy like at the bottom. So I'm wondering if I could use that instead of milk and water and just add the other beans?

Oh, and just to clarify, I don't soak the pinto beans overnight if I'm putting them in the crock pot for 8 hours and they come out very tender.
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 07:55 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,343
rodentraiser, I've used that method to make split-pea soup, so I think if you substitute the ingredients and use dry beans, it will work fine in the slow cooker.

You need to pre-soak for cooking beans the traditional way. You can soak overnight or you can bring water to a boil, put the beans in, cover and turn off the heat, and soak for an hour to get the same result.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beans, onion, recipe, salt, soup

Best Bean Soup I've Ever Made Ok, I know, bean soup is a very easy soup to make. But you have to understand, me being who I am, I often overcomplicate things. I'm always experimenting. For this soup, I kept it very simple and it came out way good. So, I'm just putting in this recipe to remind everyone how good food can be, without a lot of fuss. Enjoy. Ingredients: (All Beans were purchased pre-cooked from the supermarket) 48 oz. pinto beans 15 oz. black beans 15 oz. dark red kidney beans 1 large onion, rough dice 1 very good hot dog, quartered and sliced 8 strips of bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces 1 cup water 1/4 cup milk 1 tsp. kosher salt 1/2 tsp. black pepper. Fry the bacon, until half done (this isn't supposed to be crispy bacon), add the onion and pepper. When the onion is just beginning to soften, add the beans. let simmer for ten minutes. Add the salt, water, and milk. Simmer for thirty minutes to let the flavors distribute. Taste, correct the seasonings, and serve. Like I said, this was a very simple bean soup. And it was very tasty. The leftover beans can now be used to make baked beans, or refried beans, or a really good batch of chili, or put into some other kind of soup, used for lunches at work. I might even talk myself into serving up a bowl for a late night snack, with some good cheddar grated over the top. Occasionally, just once in a great while, life doesn't have to be so complicated. I have too many other things to complicate my days and nights right now. Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.