"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-15-2015, 04:17 PM   #21
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
You might try to keep Better Than Bullion on hand. They have the "reduced sodium" ones in all the flavors. It is not only great for enhancing the flavor of your gravy, but your soup stocks. Certainly beats using bullion cubes that have more salt than flavor.
BTB is also my go-to for making soups/stocks/gravies/sauces. Pretty good if you don't have homemade.
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 04:22 PM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Noodles

So while we are talking about chicken soup, I have a question. I have noodles to put in my daughter's soup. But she doesn't like the noodles cooked until just before you serve it. So I am sending them separate so her husband can put it on the stove and cook them.

When do you cook your noodles? I prefer to add them at the last minute myself and if they don't all get eaten the first time around, so be it. They will still be there for the leftovers.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 05:01 PM   #23
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,717
I add them to the soup to cook just before service. I don't like the idea of cooking the noodles separately then adding them to the soup.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 05:15 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I add them to the soup to cook just before service. I don't like the idea of cooking the noodles separately then adding them to the soup.
Thanks Andy. I will tell her husband to heat the soup up and add the noodles when it comes to a boil. That man can't even cook fresh air.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 06:10 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 10,161
I'm extremely disappointed. I thought this thread was going to be about the TV show!

__________________
The older I get, the harder it is to tolerate STUPID!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 07:20 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,521
I marinaded some organic chicken wings with some harissa I made (a bit fiery). I have kept the bones and am wondering whether they would be OK to make chicken stock with (along with other chicken bones I have in the freezer) since the ends of the bones/the tips may have some harissa/chilli flavour on them. Still OK? Best not to bake them though?
__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 06:12 AM   #27
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 805
I doubt very much whether the small amount of harissa on the bones would make much difference to the stock. I use leftover bones too, and it's always been ok.

As a matter of interest, what do you put in your stock when you make it? I make different types of stock, mainly chicken and beef.

For the chicken, I use fresh raw hind quarters of chicken, unpeeled golden onions (about 1lb), a couple of carrots, about two sticks of celery, bay leaf, thyme and parsley stalks, salt added at the end of cooking . I simmer it for about three hours, the dog gets the chicken meat along with his crunchies,
I strain the stock and freeze it ready for use.

I make beef stock with 2 - 3 lb beef marrow bones,marrow included, which I roast in a hot oven for a couple of hours, then fill the stockpot with the usual sticks of celery, carrots, onions with skin on, herbs etc, and cook over a gentle heat for 3 - 4 hours with a good piece of beef on the bone, then strain off all the solids, give the meat to the dog (no fat), and freeze the liquid in convenient quantities.

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 06:22 AM   #28
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I doubt very much whether the small amount of harissa on the bones would make much difference to the stock. I use leftover bones too, and it's always been ok.

As a matter of interest, what do you put in your stock when you make it? I make different types of stock, mainly chicken and beef.

For the chicken, I use fresh raw hind quarters of chicken, unpeeled golden onions (about 1lb), a couple of carrots, about two sticks of celery, bay leaf, thyme and parsley stalks, salt added at the end of cooking . I simmer it for about three hours, the dog gets the chicken meat along with his crunchies,
I strain the stock and freeze it ready for use.

I make beef stock with 2 - 3 lb beef marrow bones,marrow included, which I roast in a hot oven for a couple of hours, then fill the stockpot with the usual sticks of celery, carrots, onions with skin on, herbs etc, and cook over a gentle heat for 3 - 4 hours with a good piece of beef on the bone, then strain off all the solids, give the meat to the dog (no fat), and freeze the liquid in convenient quantities.

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
Thanks for this welcomed post since I have been wondering whether or not to chuck out the bones. Hopefully others here will agree with what you say, i.e. that the small amount of harissa left on the bones would make no odds. I suppose my concern was whether the long simmering might cause the harissa to have an adverse effect, e.g. souring the stock?

I have to admit I know I should put veg in with the bones but rarely do - I add bayleaves and the occasional onion. I simmer for one and a half hours since I read that longer simmering is not advantageous. In future I will be baking the bones first though since I have had confirmation here that this certainly adds more flavour, i.e. not just colour.

I like your Oscar Wilde quote...he is someone I greatly admire.



__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 08:08 AM   #29
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 805
Smile Bones for stock

While we've been looking at meat stocks, I came across my recipe for fish stock:

2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
2 large sticks celery, cut into 3 inch lengths
2 med. carrots, cut into chunks
Fresh bay leaves, fresh thyme, fresh parsley stalks, fresh fennel stalks cut into chunks.
Fresh fish bones and heads from white any fish, crustacean shells broken into manageable pieces
1 glass dry white wine
2 quarts hot water.
1 large stockpot

Par-cook the vegetables and herbs very gently in butter in the stockpot
Stack the fish ingredients on top, and then pour over the wine and deglaze in the pan, evaporating the alcohol, then add the hot water and simmer down, reducing by one third. Season with salt and pepper, cool and put into suitable containers for the freezer. It's great for fish soups, both Mediterranean and American, and is a real flavour enhancer.


di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 12:01 PM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,674
We save bones from all kinds of chicken dishes for stock. We even save the bones from take out fried chicken.
At any time I have a bag full of bones to use.
If my sister had not asked for the turkey carcass, I would have enough turkey bones to make a stock.
I have some bones left and some stock left. So that should be good for the soup I plan to make.

Oh.....I also add the noodles at the very end. If they say it takes 20 minutes to cook, I check them at 10 minutes and just shut off the heat.
The continue to cook and grow in size as they sit there in the soup.

Addie.....Make sure you tell him to add only a few noodles as they can absorb all your soup if your not careful. I would portion the noodles for him. Then he can just add all of them.
This is one reason to cook the noodles on the side. I don't do it, but it makes perfect sense.
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2015, 03:36 PM   #31
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 2,417
I use a smoked ham hock in my lentil soup.
__________________
I can resist anything, but temptation. Oscar Wilde
lyndalou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 09:05 AM   #32
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I add them to the soup to cook just before service. I don't like the idea of cooking the noodles separately then adding them to the soup.
Why not? That's what is done all over Asia.
Just wondering.
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 09:30 AM   #33
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,717
Bones

Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Why not? That's what is done all over Asia.

Just wondering.

Cooking the noodles in the actual soup puts the flavor of the soup into the noodles. Cooking them separately in water results in less flavorful noodles and is an extra step. Cooking them separately in a broth is a waste. What do you do with the broth? It's not that hard to manage the amount of noodles or barley so they don't take over a soup. It may take a couple of tries but once you get the proportions right you have them right forever.

If you habitually cook too many noodles or too much barley, what do you do with the leftovers?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 12:20 PM   #34
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,674
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Why not? That's what is done all over Asia.
Just wondering.
It sure is. And I will try this. But it seems cooking the noodles in the soup would provide a better tasting noodle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Cooking the noodles in the actual soup puts the flavor of the soup into the noodles. Cooking them separately in water results in less flavorful noodles and is an extra step. Cooking them separately in a broth is a waste. What do you do with the broth? It's not that hard to manage the amount of noodles or barley so they don't take over a soup. It may take a couple of tries but once you get the proportions right you have them right forever.

If you habitually cook too many noodles or too much barley, what do you do with the leftovers?
My same thinking Andy. I have considered cooking the noodles separately, but had concerns about diminished flavor.
For this very reason my soups have little noodles in them. I always put less than I think I need and it comes out good.
The noodles double or even triple in size it seems.

BTW. Who uses those "No Egg" noodles? I had been using them and they were okay. I bought some egg noodles and noticed they did not grow or get as big as the no egg noodles.
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2015, 01:09 PM   #35
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
We save bones from all kinds of chicken dishes for stock. We even save the bones from take out fried chicken.
.
Please tell me you're kidding. If there are teeth marks on bones, they go in my trash. Ick.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2015, 11:31 AM   #36
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Please tell me you're kidding. If there are teeth marks on bones, they go in my trash. Ick.
We don't save the bones we knawed on. The left over chicken pieces we save the bones. Pieces not eaten yet.
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2015, 02:35 PM   #37
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Cooking the noodles in the actual soup puts the flavor of the soup into the noodles. Cooking them separately in water results in less flavorful noodles and is an extra step. Cooking them separately in a broth is a waste. What do you do with the broth? It's not that hard to manage the amount of noodles or barley so they don't take over a soup. It may take a couple of tries but once you get the proportions right you have them right forever.

If you habitually cook too many noodles or too much barley, what do you do with the leftovers?
On the other hand, if cooked noodles are left to soak in leftover soup, their texture is ruined when it's reheated in my opinion.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2015, 02:52 PM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,042
Bones

I've found that Mexican noodles, known as fideo, keep their shape and don't turn mushy in soups better than regular egg noodles. I like to toast them first, then cook them in the soup. Surprisingly, it's been my experience that they keep their texture even after the soup has been frozen.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2015, 03:43 PM   #39
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I've found that Mexican noodles, known as fideo, keep their shape and don't turn mushy in soups better than regular egg noodles. I like to toast them first, then cook them in the soup. Surprisingly, it's been my experience that they keep their texture even after the soup has been frozen.
I was watching an episode of Rick Bayless's "Mexico: One Plate at a Time" the other day. He interviewed a Mexican chef who said that fideo was simply the broken pieces of angel hair pasta (aka vermicelli) from the bottom of the box or other container So if you have some angel hair pasta, just break it up.

I've also found that small pasta like ditalini and tiny shells don't absorb as much stock from soup, so they don't get mushy, either.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2015, 05:01 PM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,042
Bones

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I was watching an episode of Rick Bayless's "Mexico: One Plate at a Time" the other day. He interviewed a Mexican chef who said that fideo was simply the broken pieces of angel hair pasta (aka vermicelli) from the bottom of the box or other container So if you have some angel hair pasta, just break it up.

I've also found that small pasta like ditalini and tiny shells don't absorb as much stock from soup, so they don't get mushy, either.

Ours we get here are even finer than angel hair pasta. They come in all sorts of shapes, some come in long wound up strands like birds nests, some in little stars, and some are like fine short egg noodles. The brand I get is La Moderna. I need to replenish my supply, they last forever.

I think the secret for them to not turn to mush in a soup is the toasting in either butter or oil. Should work for broken up angel hair pasta too.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.