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Old 10-31-2016, 12:40 PM   #21
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I have to make sure Shrek is sleeping before I can get the chicken feet cooking...
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Old 10-31-2016, 10:18 PM   #22
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Now, I keep kosher and I for sure believe that chicken soup is in fact Jewish penicillin.
Never ever would I consider using onion with skin on phhe... ech...
The onion skin is only used to make the stock. It's strained out after simmering the stock. Not unusual, but I don't know if it's common in Jewish cooking.

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Most importantly I have cooked both kosher and non kosher chicken. Kosher chicken doesn't come close to a good plain stewing han, no gizzards (have no idea where she even found kosher chicken with gizzards, or feet for that matter, those are impossible to find in kosher) and for sure no white meat. And bay leaves? Bay leaves in chicken soup? I'm sorry this is travesty.
Again, the bay leaves are only used to flavor the stock. Typical.

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P.S. had to look her up, well maybe in England they sell chicken feet. Here in the States they don't. I think it is not even allowed. Near by kosher plant sends all the chicken feet they process to Israel because of that.
I think this varies by state. We have a sizable Asian population here; there's a huge international grocery store not too far from me that has some amazing, usually difficult to find, foods in stock, including chicken feet. They have lots of collagen.
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Old 11-01-2016, 12:40 AM   #23
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For my Chicken Noodle Soup, I do a riff on this recipe
Chicken and Dumplings Recipe : Tyler Florence : Food Network
Instead of the dumplings, I make fresh Egg Noodles, but I guess that's basically the same thing eh?
This makes a SUPER soup!
I usually double the recipe since its pretty time consuming, but worth it, oh and "discard the chicken skin", TOSH! I think NOT! that's the cook's treat
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Old 11-01-2016, 04:34 AM   #24
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Well, stone the crows (as we say in the UK when surprised), CharlieD! I always believed that Manchester UK Kosher was IT in all Western Jewish households!
No chicken feet! Chicken feet sent to Israel! My father always told me 'never make assumptions', and he was right! Chicken feet to ISRAEL!
Mind you, I learned from a Tuscan chef to put a whole hen, neck, head, feet, the lot, into me minestrone. Thanks for waking me up! Much appreciated.

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Old 11-01-2016, 06:09 AM   #25
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This is interesting. As soon as harvest is over I will have to jump in. I don't really have a recipe. I will have to write it down as I go. I have a couple small roosters in the freezer just for soup.
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Old 11-01-2016, 10:07 AM   #26
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...

Couple of points. Obviously one cannot argue about recipe, just like one cannot argue about taste.
However, the only thing that skin of onion will do to soup, is to affect the color. For that I'd rather put a clean peeled carrot.
Bay leaves are traditionally do not grown in any parts of Europe where Jews used to live, so they could not possibly have used them in the traditional way the soup was made.
We have plenty of Asian stores here too, and they too sell chicken feet. How I do not know. But I do know that the plant in Iowa, where I know people, are not allowed to sell chicken feet in the States. (Of topic) Incidentally, FDA doesn't allow export of kosher meat with bones. We get here grass fed Uruguayan beef, no bones, not allowed. Go figure. Rib eye roast without ribs
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Old 11-01-2016, 10:54 AM   #27
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Well, stone the crows (as we say in the UK when surprised), CharlieD! I always believed that Manchester UK Kosher was IT in all Western Jewish households!
No chicken feet! Chicken feet sent to Israel! My father always told me 'never make assumptions', and he was right! Chicken feet to ISRAEL!
Mind you, I learned from a Tuscan chef to put a whole hen, neck, head, feet, the lot, into me minestrone. Thanks for waking me up! Much appreciated.

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My grandfather used slaughter chickens himself, and grandma pluck the feathers and all. She for sure used all the parts, feet, head, gizzards, you name it. Just not white meat. My grandfather loved feet and (what is it called in english?)The red thing on the top of rooster's head? Actually I love gizzards.
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Old 11-01-2016, 12:15 PM   #28
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Couple of points. Obviously one cannot argue about recipe, just like one cannot argue about taste.
However, the only thing that skin of onion will do to soup, is to affect the color. For that I'd rather put a clean peeled carrot.
Bay leaves are traditionally do not grown in any parts of Europe where Jews used to live, so they could not possibly have used them in the traditional way the soup was made.
Well, Jews are not the only people who make traditional European-style chicken soup

Auguste Escoffier, who codified classic French cooking, included bay leaves in his stock recipes, and spices like cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and peppercorns don't grow in Europe, either. These items have been traded around the world for centuries. I doubt it was difficult to get bay leaves from the Roman and Ottoman Empires into France, Germany, Austria, Poland, etc. His stock recipes also include both unskinned onions and carrots, as well as celery and bouquet garni.
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Old 11-01-2016, 12:16 PM   #29
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My grandfather loved feet and (what is it called in english?)The red thing on the top of rooster's head?
The comb, or cock's comb.
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Old 11-01-2016, 04:26 PM   #30
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When I was in University in Saskatchewan, I lived in the dorm and it was divided into suites. I had a few suite-mates from Hong Kong. One of them had a sister who had a baby back home. She had a celebration with some of her Hong Kong friends and I was invited.

She made a pot of chicken soup that was like none I have ever seen. It was a chicken stock base that was blackened with soy sauce and black mushrooms. It contained chicken feet, water chestnuts, chicken meat and one shelled hard boiled egg. Each person was to take a scoop of the soup and whoever got the egg was to have good luck (I think it had to do with having a child but I am not sure as I didn't always understand them ). Since I was the "guest" I got to go first. Guess what? I got the egg. To be polite I ate it but I am not an egg fan to begin with and this one was black!

Oh, and the feet were not to eat, just to give more flavour and I think another significance but again I don't remember.
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Old 11-01-2016, 04:43 PM   #31
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Well, Jews are not the only people who make traditional European-style chicken soup

...
I see your point and agree, but originally I was responding to the Jewish chicken soup recipe, thus my comments.
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Old 11-01-2016, 05:00 PM   #32
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I see your point and agree, but originally I was responding to the Jewish chicken soup recipe, thus my comments.
That makes sense. I kind of mixed things up
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Old 11-03-2016, 01:32 PM   #33
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That makes sense. I kind of mixed things up

It's all good. (I wish we had thumbs up emoji)
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Old 11-03-2016, 01:55 PM   #34
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It's all good. (I wish we had thumbs up emoji)
👍🏻 Here you go. LOL
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Old 11-03-2016, 02:46 PM   #35
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���� Here you go. LOL
Did not work. Just two empty boxes.
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Old 11-03-2016, 04:07 PM   #36
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My favorite way to make chicken soup is to treat each ingredient in such a way so as to develop its full flavor, then combine to allow those flavors to create a robust, and balanced chicken soup. Here's how I do it, when I have the time.

Ingredients:
3 lb. whole chicken
3 stalks of celery
2 whole yellow onions, about the size of a hardball, or slightly smaller
3 large orange carrots
3/4 cup celeriac (celery root)
3 tbs. pearled barley
home made egg noodles (flour, water, salt, egg yolks)
Any chicken parts, gizards, liver, neck, tail
Ground Thyme
Rubbed Sage
Coarse grind black pepper


Remove the skin form the whole chicken, and debone the chicken. Break the larger bones in half so as to be able to extract the collagen and marrow. Place the skin into a hot pan, season with salt, and render until lightly browned and crispy. Remove the skins to your soup pot. Add the bones and brown. Pour the bones and drippings into the soup pot. Cover with 4 cups water, cover, and place over medium heat. Bring to a light boil. Wash and chop one stalk of celery and add to the pot. Cook for 1 hour.

While the broth is being made, peel and slice the carrot. Peel and quarter the onions. Set aside in a clean bowl. Dice the chicken into playing dice - sized cubes.

Test the broth and adjust the salt to taste. Pour the broth through a fine-mesh sieve and discard the solids.

Add the barley and boil for thirty minutes. Add the remaining veggies and simmer for 2 minutes more. Season with a half tsp. of both the sage and thyme. Stir well. Let simmer for five to ten minutes to let the herbs flavor the soup. If needed, add a bit more and taste again.

Finally, saute the diced chicken in a little chicken fat over medium high heat, Stirring until the chicken is very lightly browned. Place the diced chicken in a bowl. When serving, put the soup into bowls, and add the chicken meat.

Placing the diced chicken into the soup this way gives not only a great tasting broth, full flavored from the bones and skins, with properly cooked veggies (not cooked to mush), but the chicken meat is tender, juicy, and a joy to eat in the soup.

My mother's soup tasted wonderful. However, she plunked the whole chicken into the large soup pot, added the veggies, and cooked until the chicken fell apart. You had to pick out the bones in your soup bowl. I do have to say though, that she made fabulous dumplings, light and airy. I loved her dumplings.

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Old 11-03-2016, 08:15 PM   #37
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This thread opened a huge cultural chat I didn't expect. Glad it did had some interesting readings. I'll read through the recipes and pick one for next week on Saturday.

I see how many say they make 'must go soup' using whatever needs to be used and heaven knows I've done that more than a time or 2. But it's nice when soup is a main attraction and you make it deliberately as a masterpiece not just a left over clean up. Although that is still very valid
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Old 11-03-2016, 08:37 PM   #38
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This thread opened a huge cultural chat I didn't expect. Glad it did had some interesting readings. I'll read through the recipes and pick one for next week on Saturday.

I see how many say they make 'must go soup' using whatever needs to be used and heaven knows I've done that more than a time or 2. But it's nice when soup is a main attraction and you make it deliberately as a masterpiece not just a left over clean up. Although that is still very valid
Very true, Kevin. Definitely gives me thought to make a nice chicken soup, and make it the star on purpose.
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:28 AM   #39
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Some may call this Chicken and dumplings but we make it a little thinner so to us it's soup. take a whole chicken minus giblets, and place into the crock pot. Add nothing. I cook it about 8 hours on low. remove the meat and strain the broth into a large pot (I use non stick). I add about 2 cups of water and start to boil. I buy frozen Aunt Bee's dumplings (I know) from Wal mart. They are very thin and about 1" wide by about 6" long. Break them in half or thirds and add to the boiling stock. Stir constantly until they stop sticking together. Cover and turn the heat to ML and simmer until the dumplings are tender. If you want to thicken to make dumplings use corn starch or adjust the water to your liking and add how ever much chicken you want back to the pot. we use the left over chicken to make chicken salad. The flavor is wonderful. I use a crock pot liner so the clean up is easy. Freezes well too.


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Old 11-04-2016, 02:55 PM   #40
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Because I grew up in the E.U.P., dumplings were made from biscuit dough, and steamed on top of the soup. They were light, fluffy, and not at all soggy. The noodle style dumplings, sometimes called sliders never really appealed to me. I'd rather have good, home made egg noodles. But that's just me. And like the extra flavor provided by frying the skin and bones. Some her on DC roast the bones and skins, or even the whole chicken to produce a richer flavor.

Chicken soup is wonderful, no matter how you prefer it. I like to add a little thyme, and/or sage. I just want every part of the soup to be excellent so that the sum is greater that the already really good parts.

Kevin86, I agree that chicen soup should be the star. To me, soup, any soup, when served, is the main course, except for my essence soups, which are made to be appetite whetting appetizers.

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