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Old 11-04-2016, 03:29 PM   #41
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I always through my chicken carcasses in the freezer - home cooked and rotisserie - until I have a bunch then I make stock. I used it for our soup and for our dog Violet to mix with her liquid medicine. It is the easiest way to get it in her and she loves the little "soup appetizer" LOL

For my chicken soup, I kind of go Kathy-Lee's way as well. Though everyone seems to love my curried chicken corn chowder. (this one is real corn, not the acronym though I love that!)

Saute diced onion (2 small or one medium) and celery (2 or three stocks), minced garlic and chopped bacon in a large soup pot until the onion and celery are soft and the bacon is cooked but not crisp. Add about a cup of chicken stock and scrape any bits off the bottom of the pot (deglaze). add 2 or three medium potatoes peeled and cut into small dice. Add more chicken stock to cover and 1 - 2 tsp of curry powder or to taste. Simmer until the potato is tender. Add 1 - 2 cups chopped cooked chicken (rotisserie is great here), salt, pepper and 2 cups of milk. Turn heat down and heat through, stirring so it doesn't burn on the bottom. Adjust curry and other seasonings as needed.

I sometimes add a little cumin and/or coriander. Another nice touch is fresh parsley when serving.

My measurements are very rough because I just eyeball everything and adjust to taste.

This was a favourite on my catering menu.
I just decided what to put in my third crockpot today! All this talk about chicken soup got me going!
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Old 11-04-2016, 05:38 PM   #42
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Chief LongWind

E.U.P.?? wazzat? and I don't believe I've ever heard of noodle style dumplings? is that relatively new? I thought 'sliders' were those little tiny hamburger style things, yahh! just what we need!.. more bread!

All my family often made dumplings.. I fail to understand why people come off saying they are "soggy". They are boiled/steamed on top of liquid. One could possibly describe the bottom 1/8 inch of a dumpling as "soggy" but really??? the rest is puffy delicate yummy deliciousness! Made to be eaten with the gravy!
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:00 PM   #43
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Chief LongWind

E.U.P.?? wazzat? and I don't believe I've ever heard of noodle style dumplings? is that relatively new? I thought 'sliders' were those little tiny hamburger style things, yahh! just what we need!.. more bread!

All my family often made dumplings.. I fail to understand why people come off saying they are "soggy". They are boiled/steamed on top of liquid. One could possibly describe the bottom 1/8 inch of a dumpling as "soggy" but really??? the rest is puffy delicate yummy deliciousness! Made to be eaten with the gravy!
I think U. P. Means Upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Chief stated he was describing noodle style dumplings (NOT biscuit dumplings) as being soggy. You obviously have never had noodle dumplings. Cracker Barrel country restaurant serves noodle style chicken and dumplings.

Pioneer Cut Dumplings from the 1800's Recipe - Allrecipes.com
This link has a recipe for noodle style dumplings also called sliders (pictured below) which have been around "forever ". And I also don't care for them. They feel soggy and slimy to me akin to the mushy noodles in canned Campbell's chicken noodle soup. It is mostly/predominantly a southern thing. I also like the fluffy biscuit style dumplings better. This my opinion.
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Old 11-05-2016, 12:41 AM   #44
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When I make Chicken Soup I buy all fresh chicken and veggies.
All my soups are made intentionally. The exception is Beef Barley soup were I sometimes use leftover Pot Roast.

Here is my recipe for Ms. Mofet's Chicken Soup
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Old 11-05-2016, 02:56 AM   #45
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I've followed this thread closely, and learned a lot from it, and we haven't yet got round to the clinical benefits of chicken soup! I can't help having a sneaking feeling we all know about those. We all know too well without saying it the feeling of wellbeing we get when we eat it, no matter what family recipe we use or otherwise, and a handed down recipe is always special. Your knowledge and experience on this NG is always inspiring, and there's always something to learn. I think this has so far been a very GOOD thread as an example of and excellent exchange of experience, views, and discussion of something which is perhaps a little closer to our hearts than we thought. Personally, I thank you all for that, I've learned a HELL of a lot.

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Old 11-05-2016, 03:05 AM   #46
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My Mom made the best dumplings ever! Like most family favourites, she took the recipe with her. While I have tried to duplicate the steamed fluffy clouds of goodness I have not even come close...ever!
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Old 11-05-2016, 06:55 AM   #47
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This is a recipe for suet dumplings, from the book 'British Cookery', published in 1976. Almost a thing of the past these days, these dumplings are light as a feather:

1/2 plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
salt
40 shredded suet
Enough cold water to form a light but stiff dough (if that makes sense - it should be very stiff)

combine the ingredients, form the resultant dough medium sized balls, say a little bit bigger than a golf ball. Have your dish - it could be soup, or a stew with enough gravy to be able to cook the dumplings in it, ready. I cover the pot and cook the stew/soup until the dumplings have leavened and are soft like fairly firm sponge. I often season my dumplings with mixed herbs, either fresh or dried.
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Old 11-05-2016, 07:41 AM   #48
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All soup starts with good stock. I am in the homemade stock is the best camp, so we won't go there. However, a few things I learned working in commercial kitchens when it comes to chicken stock:

1. Crack the bones. Brown them stovetop.
2. Cook the bones in a roaster pan overnight at 250 with enough water to cover.
3. Toss in a tea ball filled with pickling spice (that really makes a difference), chunks of onion, celery, carrot.
4. A splash of apple cider vinegar, and some grated ginger.
5. Fennel. Really does up the ante.
6. In the morning, strain the juice out, toss the veggies and spices. Let cool in the fridge to get any fat off.

Now, time to go for soup.

I will be making stock later today. It will take all day in the oven.

I will never use chicken feet--I know where they have been. As for combs, well, I am not keen on those either. I like to use thigh, neck, and back bones for stock. I strip the meat off--I am going for the collagen and whatever else bones offer--meat gets added close to the end of making the soup.
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Old 11-05-2016, 10:02 AM   #49
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Your knowledge and experience on this NG is always inspiring, and there's always something to learn.
It took me a few minutes to figure out what you meant by NG. Then I remembered you calling Discuss Cooking a newsgroup. It's actually not - it's a forum. I hope you don't mind me mentioning that; just trying to minimize confusion
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Old 11-05-2016, 10:15 AM   #50
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I don't mind at all - glad you put me right. Slips like that can be very irritating.
I'll make sure I keep on the right track!

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Old 11-06-2016, 03:55 PM   #51
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I have 3 chicken soups I love, one is slow cooking one with rice, then taco and then this corn chowder.

Corn Chowder with chicken balls.

4 servings

600 gram of drained corn from a can
500 ml water
500 ml milk
1 medium sized onion
2 tablespoon plain flour
2 teaspoon cumin
2 chicken stock cubes
1 teaspoon sambal oelek
Salt and black pepper to season
oil

For the chicken balls.
400 gram of chicken mince ( I do my own)
½ teaspoon of salt
2 teaspoon of fajita spice ( I will give you this and it not proper but it works)
1 tablespoon corn starch

oil
Toppings

Chopped Scallions
Chopped chilies
nachos
grated cheese
or what you like

Fajita Spice mix:
1 teaspoon garlic powder
2 teaspoon smoked paprika powder
2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 teaspoon oregano
½ teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon chili flakes
½ teaspoon black pepper.
Add this to spice grinder, and grind to find powder.



Start with the balls. Combine mince, spices, salt and corn starch, make sure it well blended. Roll small balls, remember they should be bite size. Heat up a little oil in pan and fry the balls by rocking the pan to keep them round. You might need to do two or three batches. Done. Set aside.

The soup:
Mix the corn smooth with half of the milk. Chop the onion finely . In large pot, add a little oil and when hot add the onion and fry until translucent . Now add the flour and cumin and stir. Pour in the milk, while stirring and then water and the corn/milk. Whisk until it start to simmer. Crumble in the stock cubes, add the sambal oelek and stir. Simmer for 10 minutes. Taste and then season with salt pepper to taste.

To serve: Pour soup in bowls, let people take as much or as little balls they want and let people make their own choice what topping goes on the soup.
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Old 11-06-2016, 05:31 PM   #52
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Cake Poet, Speaking of chicken balls, thank you for bringing this up. One time I was telling coworker of mine that I make chicken balls for the chicken soup she told me that I do not know what I am talking about and there is no such thing and nobody makes them. Go figure. I like to grind white meat only.
2 medium size chicken breasts
1 small onion
1 egg
1 slice of white bread
salt & pepper to taste
Mix well, form golf size balls, add to soup when the water is boiling.
Needles to say you can add any spices you like.
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Old 11-06-2016, 09:43 PM   #53
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I think the first weeks winner is going to chicken and dumpling soup. I still have leftovers from last week but early this week I'll be looking through the chicken and dumpling notes and maybe steal bits here and there.

A lighter soup this week sounds good. Who's with me? Enjoy everyone .
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Old 11-06-2016, 10:19 PM   #54
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I called these chicken balls. They didn't go in a soup, but they sure were good!

Food Wishes Video Recipes: Deep-Fried Creamy Chicken Gravy – Almost Chicken Croquettes

I'd love to join the contest but alas, I'm just not a chicken soup fan. The only time I want to eat any kind of chicken soup is when I'm sick with a cold. And at that point I'm too sick to want to cook anything, so Campbell's is what I end up having.

But I am going to follow this thread because the recipes already look very, very good.
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Old 11-07-2016, 02:22 AM   #55
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This is a recipe for suet dumplings, from the book 'British Cookery', published in 1976. Almost a thing of the past these days, these dumplings are light as a feather:

1/2 plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
salt
40 shredded suet
Enough cold water to form a light but stiff dough (if that makes sense - it should be very stiff)

combine the ingredients, form the resultant dough medium sized balls, say a little bit bigger than a golf ball. Have your dish - it could be soup, or a stew with enough gravy to be able to cook the dumplings in it, ready. I cover the pot and cook the stew/soup until the dumplings have leavened and are soft like fairly firm sponge. I often season my dumplings with mixed herbs, either fresh or dried.
You know, Di, I think you might be on to something. I seem to remember my Mom using suet in a lot of things and it could be the key to her dumplings! I will give this a try...I may have to sub bacon fat for suet though.
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Old 11-07-2016, 06:14 AM   #56
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Cake Poet, Speaking of chicken balls, thank you for bringing this up. One time I was telling coworker of mine that I make chicken balls for the chicken soup she told me that I do not know what I am talking about and there is no such thing and nobody makes them. Go figure. I like to grind white meat only.
2 medium size chicken breasts
1 small onion
1 egg
1 slice of white bread
salt & pepper to taste
Mix well, form golf size balls, add to soup when the water is boiling.
Needles to say you can add any spices you like.

That is nearly like quenelle, I do make them too for chicken soup, but not for the chowder.
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:08 AM   #57
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I roasted chicken legs and thighs, pulled the meat off, tossed the bones and skin back in the oven to roast with 1/4 of my diced carrot, onion, celery mix (1 pound of veggies) and 1/2 pound of sliced mushrooms. Once roasted well and caramelized veggies, I placed in a stockpot the bones and skin with 8 quarts of water, salt, pepper and minced garlic. Brought to a boil and allowed to simmer for thirty minutes. Strained the stock into a bowl, tossing out the solids. One stick of butter into the stock pot, sauteed the rest of the veggies until the onions were transparent, sprinkled on more salt and pepper, added some poultry seasoning, poured the stock back in and simmered until the carrots were tender. Added in the chopped meat, simmered another 30 minutes. Tossed in some frozen egg noodles, cooked till tender. Served. It is excellent. Taking more to work with me tonight.
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Old 11-07-2016, 11:21 AM   #58
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You know, Di, I think you might be on to something. I seem to remember my Mom using suet in a lot of things and it could be the key to her dumplings! I will give this a try...I may have to sub bacon fat for suet though.
I think lard would also work.
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Old 11-07-2016, 12:16 PM   #59
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That is nearly like quenelle, I do make them too for chicken soup, but not for the chowder.
Had to look up what quenelle was. Seems that the name believed to originated from German "Knödel", which makes sense that they are similar because my grandparents actually called said meat balls Knödels. Small world we live in.
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Old 11-07-2016, 03:51 PM   #60
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CharlieD Knödel for me is more like dumplings and made most often with potatoes. A Knödel is much more dense then a quenelle.
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