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Old 11-29-2007, 11:10 AM   #1
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Egg Drop and Won Ton Soup Recipes

Here are two recipes copied from my Cookbook - "You Can Be A Great Cook With Soups, Stews, and Chowders. Hope you enojoy them. And remember, recipes are just a starting point. Once you understand the basic recipe, feel free to change it, play with it, make it yours. That is the joy found in cooking.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

Egg Drop Soup:
This soup originated in the East. It boasts the subtle flavors of chicken stock, celery, onion, and ginger. The egg strands add body, texture and color, as well as nutrition to this soup. All I can say is that it is good stuff.
Ingredients:
4 cups chicken broth
1/8 cup finely chopped green onion
2 large eggs well beaten
3 large button mushrooms, minced
1/8 tsp. Ground ginger

In a 2 quart pan, heat the broth to gentle boil. Add onion, ginger, and mushrooms. Cook for twenty minutes to allow the flavors to combine. Turn the heat down until the water quits boiling. It cant be boiling or it will tear up the egg strands.
Slowly pour the beaten egg into the broth, taking care to keep the bowl moving. The idea is to form long strands of egg. Do not stir.
Serve as an appetizer.
*
Won Ton Soup
Won Tons are great little noodles that can be simmered in liquid, or fried. When simmered, or steamed, they resemble ravioli noodles, but more delicate. Of course in this book, we will be simmering them in broth. But because of their delicate nature, we need to be careful that the broth is not boiling rapidly to avoid breaking the noodles apart.
Here is the recipe to get creative with. You can fill won tons with just about anything you desire. In this recipe, we will use chicken. Also remember, oriental foods always seek a balance of flavors; and the soups are light in flavor, and usually less salty than American soups.
Ingredients:
1 pkg. Won Ton skins
2 lbs. cut up frying chicken
1/4 cup sliced and halved water chestnuts
1/4 cup coarsely chopped bamboo shoots
1/4 cup diced onion
2 stalks celery, diced
 green pepper, chopped (optional)
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. Ground ginger
2 tbs. Soy sauce
Scant dash of Chinese 5 spice powder
2 cups fresh Bean Sprouts, chopped
1 cup peanut or sunflower oil + 2 tbs.
1 egg, beaten
2 tbs. water
Skin and bone the chicken. Place the skin and bones in two cups of boiling water and cover. Turn heat down to simmer. Finely dice the chicken meat into small pieces. Heat 2 tbs. of the peanut oil in a steel wok, or large heavy skillet (I prefer seasoned cast iron if I'm not using my wok). Add the chicken and half of the salt. Cover with a lid and cook for about seven minutes, stirring frequently. Remove the cooked chicken to a large bowl (very large) and pour any juices from the pan into the boiling chicken stock.
Return the wok to the stove and reheat. Add the onion, garlic, peppers, bok choy, water chestnuts, and bamboo shoots. Stir fry on highest heat setting for five minutes without lid. Remove the cooked vegetables to the bowl with the chicken. Add the spices and soy sauce to the bowl and mix well.
Place the bean sprouts into the wok and cover. Add 1/2 cup water to the wok. Cook for seven to ten minutes until the bean sprouts turn white and loose the translucent quality. Add to the meat and vegetable mixture and toss thoroughly. Place bowl where you can easily reach into it and let cool for ten minutes.
Remove the skin and bones from the broth and discard. Strain the broth through a fine sieve to remove any bone fragments. Add water to make four cups of broth. Use the broth as the soup stock. Bring broth to a boil, add chives to the boiling broth, cover and turn down to simmer. Fill and fold won ton skins (any left-over filling can be combined with fried or wild rice).
Folding the won tons is not difficult, but does require two or three practice won-tons to get into the swing of things. It is best to use multiple people to speed the process.
Here are step by step instructions.
1. Separate won ton skins and lay side by side on a large clean surface.
2. Make egg wash by combining the raw egg and 2 tbs. water in a bowl, then whipping with a wire whisk or fork until well blended. Brush the won ton skins with the egg wash.
3. Place 1 tsp. full of filling into the center of a won ton skin.
4. Fold the top edge of the skin until it just covers the filling.
5. Fold both sides toward the center and press lightly to seal.
6. Fold the bottom upward and press lightly to seal.
7. Place immediately into boiling liquid. Cook until the skins take on the characteristics of a cooked noodle. Serve as the first course in a Chinese meal.

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Old 11-29-2007, 12:02 PM   #2
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Wow, your wonton soup is seriously involved deal. I make mine very simple, mostly because I never used a recipe I simply tried to come up with the same taste I was used to in this one particular restaurant. Interesting. Maybe next time I'll try your recipe. Thank you.
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:01 PM   #3
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Who is your book published with Goodweed? I did a websearch & couldn't find anything.
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Old 11-29-2007, 08:18 PM   #4
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Don't go plagiarising urself now LOLLL
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Old 11-29-2007, 08:26 PM   #5
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Who is your book published with Goodweed? I did a websearch & couldn't find anything.
I got mine directly from Goodweed, Breezy. Actually, the one I got is really 4 of his books on one cd. I think you can get them separately but you should probably check with Goodweed about that.

(BTW I love his books!)
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:00 PM   #6
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Who is your book published with Goodweed? I did a websearch & couldn't find anything.
Check you PM's.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:07 PM   #7
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Goodweed - can we have proof that you are really you and you gave you permission to post this? What, no pictures?
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:13 PM   #8
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Kitchenelf - that isn't what I meant by posting my question. I was actually excited that we had a cookbook author in our midst. That's all. Geesh.
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:18 PM   #9
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Goodweed - can we have proof that you are really you and you gave you permission to post this? What, no pictures?
Do I need to write a 20 page dissertation on the life and times of Goodweed of the North? Huh? Huh? Don't get me going. You know I'll do it. I'm not afraid to be verbose. Why, once I had a bus-driver who grabbed me by the neck and litterally carried me to the front seat of the bus because he said I was too noisy. So I remained quiet until he let me have another seat. He put me with a kid who was very quiet. Within three weeks, I had both my new freind, and myself carried once again to the fron of the bus, right behind the driver, and need you ask why. Well I'm going to tell you. He and I were TOO NOISY! Need any more convincing?

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North, and yes, that is a true story.
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:45 PM   #10
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Kitchenelf - that isn't what I meant by posting my question. I was actually excited that we had a cookbook author in our midst. That's all. Geesh.
Me, too, Breezy! I know for a fact we actually have 2 - Goodweed and ChefJune! And lucky me, I have both of their books! I can't tell you what I kick I get out of reading and making recipes from authors that I "know". (Plus, they are both incredibly good writers. Even I can follow their recipes and explanations.)
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Old 11-29-2007, 09:58 PM   #11
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Me, too, Breezy! I know for a fact we actually have 2 - Goodweed and ChefJune! And lucky me, I have both of their books! I can't tell you what I kick I get out of reading and making recipes from authors that I "know". (Plus, they are both incredibly good writers. Even I can follow their recipes and explanations.)
You make me blush. And believe me, that's not an easy thing to do. Thanks. It makes all the work worth it.

And ChefJune, if you are reading this, how would I get hold of your book?

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 11-29-2007, 10:04 PM   #12
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Hey Goodweed, if I managed to write a book, much less a really useful one, I'd be shouting it from the rooftops! Remember how surprised I was when you helped me and I said you should write a book and then you told me you already had????? Seriously, I think ya'll are waaaay too modest.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:32 AM   #13
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Egg Drop Soup:Slowly pour the beaten egg into the broth, taking care to keep the bowl moving. The idea is to form long strands of egg. Do not stir.
Hi Goodweed, thanks for posting your recipes! Stupid question -- What do you mean by keep the bowl moving? I thought maybe you mean keep the broth moving, but you also say not to stir... I'd like to be able to make long strands of the egg...

TIA!
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Old 11-30-2007, 01:39 PM   #14
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Hi Goodweed, thanks for posting your recipes! Stupid question -- What do you mean by keep the bowl moving? I thought maybe you mean keep the broth moving, but you also say not to stir... I'd like to be able to make long strands of the egg...

TIA!
By this, I mean to move the bowl around as you slowly pour a thin, continuous stream of beaten egg into the broth. You have to be gentle with this so as to not break up the egg before it sets in the hot broth. This is also the reasaon you don't stir and why the soup is not boling at this point. The liquid is plenty hot enough to set the egg without it boiling. The egg sets at about 170' F. while water boils at around 212' F.

So, if the broth is realtively still, and you pour the egg in as a continuous strand, while moving the bowl that the egg is in, you get the long ribbons of egg. Hope that helps.

Oh, and traditionally, egg drop soup is a mild-flavored, clear chicken broth sometimes flavored with a hint of ginger or pepper, with little to no chicken meat, and chives sprinkled over the top. Of course, various restaurants will say that there's is the "authemtic recipe and will add carrots, chopped onion, celery, etc. But a little research will show you that what I claim is true. In any case, you can add whatever you like to make it "just right" for you. In fact, I encourage you to play with all of my recipes, and turn them into your recipes.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-01-2007, 09:42 AM   #15
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Thanks GW! My mom's egg drop soup has always had short egg strands. I always wondered how restaurants did it. I'm gonna try your technique next time! :-)
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Old 12-01-2007, 09:45 AM   #16
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great recipes gw, thanks!

i'm definitely gonna try your egg snot soup recipe.

have you ever tried adding strips of nori to it? a local chinese place makes theirs that way, of which i'm addicted. but their broth is extremely fatty and salty, so i'd like to make a healthier version at home.
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Old 12-01-2007, 11:03 AM   #17
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Kitchenelf - that isn't what I meant by posting my question. I was actually excited that we had a cookbook author in our midst. That's all. Geesh.
No need to get nasty Breezy. Kitchenelf was obviously making a joke.

GW, thanks for posting those. I do plan on trying the Won Ton soup someday.
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Old 12-01-2007, 11:16 AM   #18
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great recipes gw, thanks!

i'm definitely gonna try your egg snot soup recipe.

have you ever tried adding strips of nori to it? a local chinese place makes theirs that way, of which i'm addicted. but their broth is extremely fatty and salty, so i'd like to make a healthier version at home.
Egg Snot soup he says. Hey Bucky; I got a yard-full of snow and a good hurling arm. Not sure if I can pitch that snowball all the way to the East Coast though. Come a little closer, come on, just a bit closer. I dare ya. Just remember the hot-tub and all those water balloons we threw at the ladies. My aim is even better with snow balls.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-01-2007, 11:27 AM   #19
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yes, gw, i've heard that youpers play with their snowballs often...

j/k.

umm, whatta bout the seaweed? ever try it?

i love seaweed, in it's many varieties. btw, i was mistaken that it was nori. i just happened to be speaking to a buddy who knows the same chinese joint and is also addicted to the seaweed eggsnot soup. they do add a nori-like seaweed, but it is processed so that it breaks up more naturally in a hot liquid suach as the soup. it's not as "sheety" as nori is, if you know what i mean.

oh, i'm pm'ing you about the cookbooks. lol, i'm buying myself a christmas present this year, and it's your books. thanks, buddy.
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Old 12-01-2007, 11:48 AM   #20
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yes, gw, i've heard that youpers play with their snowballs often...

j/k.

umm, whatta bout the seaweed? ever try it?

i love seaweed, in it's many varieties. btw, i was mistaken that it was nori. i just happened to be speaking to a buddy who knows the same chinese joint and is also addicted to the seaweed eggsnot soup. they do add a nori-like seaweed, but it is processed so that it breaks up more naturally in a hot liquid suach as the soup. it's not as "sheety" as nori is, if you know what i mean.

oh, i'm pm'ing you about the cookbooks. lol, i'm buying myself a christmas present this year, and it's your books. thanks, buddy.
I've never tried it in my soup because it is just not available around these parts. I have had nori and found it a bit overpowering. If used in a soup though, I believe it would be very good, kind of like using too much poisson sauce with rice noodles. If used in the right amount, it enhances the dish. If too much is added, then you get that "bucket full of dead fish) aroma and taste.

I do use clam juice in various things and love it. One of these years I would love to visit the east coast and try out some New England/New York/Jersey cuisine. I have heard very good things about the foods in your patch of ground.

I'll send you a PM with my address on it for the cookbooks.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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