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Old 10-18-2013, 04:32 PM   #21
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I guess it's a vegetarian version, although I never thought of it that way. Here's a recipe: Corn Chowder Recipe : Tyler Florence : Recipes : Food Network If you can't get fresh corn, I'd use frozen.

There's also corn and crab chowder: Corn & Crab Chowder Recipe I know I'm spoiled here on the coast, but I can't imagine making this with canned crab.
Thanks GG (and I notice there were loads of other variations on there too - including ones with cheese, and chicken!)

However, having acquired my very rare tin of clams, I really want to do a Clam Chowder and it would seem that putting sweetcorn in with it is a definite no no! (Though I still don't see why!)
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:36 PM   #22
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Thanks GG (and I notice there were loads of other variations on there too - including ones with cheese, and chicken!)

However, having acquired my very rare tin of clams, I really want to do a Clam Chowder and it would seem that putting sweetcorn in with it is a definite no no! (Though I still don't see why!)
I don't think corn would enhance the flavor of the clams, and they are the star of this dish. Nothing stopping you from serving them alongside, though Then try a bite with and without and see what you think. Don't forget to report back!
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:39 PM   #23
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I wouldn't say its a version, not of clam chowder anyway, it's just another chowder. I'll bet the ingredients are pretty similar except for the clams and the corn. But I really wouldn't know as I've never made either. I'm not a big soup maker unless I'm turning leftovers into something.
And truth be told, I love some of the storebought clam chowders. Campbells Select is it? Good stuff. For as often as I eat clam chowder that works for me.
What makes any soup or stew become chowder is the addition of milk or cream (dairy) in place of meat based broth. In Ye Days of Olde, almost every household had a cow or milk giving animal. Otherwise it is soup or stew.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:39 PM   #24
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Also, the crackers Addie mentioned are nice in the chowder. I too serve it with crusty bread and a green salad. It's pretty hearty, so it doesn't need a lot of accompaniments.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:41 PM   #25
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I take it you don't live near the coast!

The "tinned" clams. Is it sea water or water that has had salt water added to it. Take a taste. If it is too salty, toss it. If not, add it to the chowder.

Can you find clam juice in the bottle? I would think it is better than fish stock. Enhances the clam flavor.

Corn in clam chowder? You Heretic!

I have always since childhood had oysterette crackers with any chowder. They are very small round crackers similar to saltines in taste. Some nice soft high homemade biscuits smothered with butter would do very well also.
Well, I actually live 30 miles from the nearest coast, but it is a lot further to anywhere with a fishing industry. And I guess clams are just not something we eat over here.

No clam juice! (Which probably won't come as any surprise!)

Okay! No corn in the chowder! This message is coming in loud and clear from across the pond!

I have no idea what a "high homemade biscuit" is by the way! A biscuit here, is what you would call a "cookie" (sweet and crispy and definitely not to eat with a Chowder!) But my guess is, it must be something like a savoury scone. (Simple non-yeast dough, cut into circles and baked).
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:44 PM   #26
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Also, the crackers Addie mentioned are nice in the chowder. I too serve it with crusty bread and a green salad. It's pretty hearty, so it doesn't need a lot of accompaniments.
I will have to take pictures of my effort - it is becoming increasingly obvious it may not be a total success! I am still determined to give it a go though.

Are the crackers ones you buy or make?

I am quite happy to just serve with crusty bread and butter and a salad.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:44 PM   #27
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What makes any soup or stew become chowder is the addition of milk or cream (dairy) in place of meat based broth. In Ye Days of Olde, almost every household had a cow or milk giving animal. Otherwise it is soup or stew.
Not exactly: http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsoups.html#chowder

"What is chowder?
"A seafood soup associated with New England, the most popular of which is clam chowder. The term may also describe a buttery, hearty soup made with corn, chicken, or other chunks of food still evident in the blend. The origins of the word "chowder" are somewhat obscure, but most authories, including the Dictionary of American Regional English, believes it derives from the French word for a large caldron, chaudiere, in which Breton sailors threw their catch to make a communal stew, a custom carried to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and down to New England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries...The first American cookbook to give a chowder recipe was the second edition of Amelia Simmons's American Cookery (1800). It called for bass, salt pork crackers, and a side dish of potatoes...Although by 1836 "clam chowder" was known in Boston, where its associations are still strong, throughout the century chowder was less commonly a dish of clams than of fish, usually cod or haddock, and by the 1840s potatoes had become a traditional ingredient...Chowder was a staple dish of New Englanders, and for sailors merely another another way to make a constant diet of fish palatable...By the end of the century certain New England regions became known for their various interpretations of chowder--one might find cream in one spot, lobsters in others, no potatoes elsewhere--but most were by then a creamy white soup brimming with chopped fish or clams, crackers, and butter..."
---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. Mariani [Lebhar-Friedman:New York] 1999 (p. 81-82)"
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:47 PM   #28
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I don't think corn would enhance the flavor of the clams, and they are the star of this dish. Nothing stopping you from serving them alongside, though Then try a bite with and without and see what you think. Don't forget to report back!
I will definitely report back GG! (But there will be no corn!!)
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:50 PM   #29
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Although I'm not a fan of New England clam chowder (I don't like milk). I am a fan of Manhattan Clam Chowder. Sorry Boston! I have made it many times. Living in MT now, its hard to find fresh clams for chowder. When I lived in NJ I use to bye by the bushel. Anyway. Using fresh is always better. Bye the larger chowder clams 3-4" and chop them. Get some cherry stones (1 or 2 doz) to add later.
As far as canned clams, Sea Watch is a very good product. They come in a 52oz can. They are sea clams and are fine for making chowder. I strain them and use the broth for stock adding fish stock too. After bacon and veggies are done I add the clams to cook for the last 1 minute. The more you cook them the tougher they get. Cook fresh clams just until they open.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:50 PM   #30
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I will have to take pictures of my effort - it is becoming increasingly obvious it may not be a total success! I am still determined to give it a go though.

Are the crackers ones you buy or make?

I am quite happy to just serve with crusty bread and butter and a salad.
We buy the crackers but you could make croutons with some of the crusty bread. The crunch goes well with the creamy soup.

Looking forward to pictures! Look to Harry's for a model of what to include
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:56 PM   #31
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The brand of canned clam makes a big difference. I used to use Snow's but now I buy large cans of Caravelle that I get at my asian market. They are cheaper,larger,meatier,tastier. 2 cans gives me PLENTY of clams and I don't have to buy extra juice.
Thanks, I'll look for that next time I'm at the Asian market.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:57 PM   #32
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Although I'm not a fan of New England clam chowder (I don't like milk). I am a fan of Manhattan Clam Chowder. Sorry Boston! I have made it many times. Living in MT now, its hard to find fresh clams for chowder. When I lived in NJ I use to bye by the bushel. Anyway. Using fresh is always better. Bye the larger chowder clams 3-4" and chop them. Get some cherry stones (1 or 2 doz) to add later.
As far as canned clams, Sea Watch is a very good product. They come in a 52oz can. They are sea clams and are fine for making chowder. I strain them and use the broth for stock adding fish stock too. After bacon and veggies are done I add the clams to cook for the last 1 minute. The more you cook them the tougher they get. Cook fresh clams just until they open.
Why on earth would I add cherry stones to anything, let alone a Clam Chowder?
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:58 PM   #33
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Well, I actually live 30 miles from the nearest coast, but it is a lot further to anywhere with a fishing industry. And I guess clams are just not something we eat over here.

No clam juice! (Which probably won't come as any surprise!)

Okay! No corn in the chowder! This message is coming in loud and clear from across the pond!

I have no idea what a "high homemade biscuit" is by the way! A biscuit here, is what you would call a "cookie" (sweet and crispy and definitely not to eat with a Chowder!) But my guess is, it must be something like a savoury scone. (Simple non-yeast dough, cut into circles and baked).
I must remember that. I am referring to baking powder biscuits.

Biscuit Recipe & Video - Joyofbaking.com *Video Recipe*

This is what Americans are always referring to when the word "biscuits" is used. They are not sweet like a our scones are. Americans are always searching for the highest biscuit recipe. The higher they rise, the lighter they are. Like eating a 'cloud'.
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Old 10-18-2013, 04:59 PM   #34
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The brand of canned clam makes a big difference. I used to use Snow's but now I buy large cans of Caravelle that I get at my asian market. They are cheaper,larger,meatier,tastier. 2 cans gives me PLENTY of clams and I don't have to buy extra juice.
I'll have to look for those. Right now all I've ever used is Snows canned clams.
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:01 PM   #35
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Why on earth would I add cherry stones to anything, let alone a Clam Chowder?
Hee hee! Cherrystones are a type of clam. http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-d...ittle-ne-61333
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:02 PM   #36
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I am not even going to mention the brand of clams I found! I'll probably get lynched! (Suffice to say, it is none of the above!)

Just bear in mind I have been to every store in town and only one had ANY clams at all, so it was this one or nothing!
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:03 PM   #37
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Oh, that was cruel!!
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:06 PM   #38
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Also, the crackers Addie mentioned are nice in the chowder. I too serve it with crusty bread and a green salad. It's pretty hearty, so it doesn't need a lot of accompaniments.
For some I suppose
I never got the attraction of adding crackers to a nice thick chowder. Chicken noodle soup, sure, after you run out of noodles and stuff and have nothing left but broth, but chowders?
But that's what makes the world go round
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:08 PM   #39
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Why on earth would I add cherry stones to anything, let alone a Clam Chowder?
I would have responded sooner but I can't stop laughing. and it is hard to see with tears running down my face.

Cherry stones are a name we give to hard shell clams. There are soft shell, little necks, quahogs, etc. They are different sizes. The quahogs which are the largest are difficult to open and are often cut up and mixed with breadcrumbs or other filler, placed back into the washed shell and baked. The cherry stones can often be used for fried clams or chowder. The smallest are soft shells and are just babies. Clammers (people who did clams for a living) put them back to grow some more.
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Old 10-18-2013, 05:10 PM   #40
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I assume we are all agreed that smoked bacon is the way to go?
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