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Old 01-02-2012, 11:52 AM   #21
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I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?
You could try vegtable broth but I am not sure how that would taste... Maybe start with vegtable and add some of the sherry or wine that others have posted...
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Old 01-02-2012, 03:04 PM   #22
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What is the blog address so we can read it? Thanks!
I Love Soup
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Old 01-02-2012, 03:08 PM   #23
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I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?
Hi Jolokia,

I would like to suggest to try vegetable stock with dry white wine and some soy sauce.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:36 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Jolokia View Post
I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?

Actually it really is not that unique. I cannot use beef stock in that soup either. All you have to do is to buy ready made vegetarian "beef" stock. It is available in stores. And there you go, you are on the way to a good soup without having have to brake your religiuos or simply diet adhearance.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:40 PM   #25
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here is the link to what i am refering to:

http://www.amazon.com/Osem-Flavor-Pa...5612364&sr=8-1
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:54 PM   #26
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I have to laugh. I often think ... soup ... recipe? Recipe for soup? Is there such a thing? Rarely do I make soup from a recipe, I just use whatever is at hand, peasant food, so to speak.

Yeah, my real name is Claire. I think there is room for two claires in DC!

I did pea soup, my recipe such as it is, on another line.

One you might consider is grilling over charcoal, many different vegetables. Onions, for sure, leeks, squash of various kinds, both summer and winter, eggplant. Toss them in olive oil seasoned with some garlic kind of seasoning mix. Grill until browned. Then chop (I usually slice in half vertically before grilling). Then stick in a stock pot and cover with water. After stewing for awhile, you will have a great base for vegetarian soups of all kinds.

From one Claire to another --
I agree with both Claire's. Great soup is so easy to make. But don't scoff at recipes. Sometimes, just every once in a while, you make something that comes out amazing. And with a recipe, you can recreate that amaizing soup, or whatever it is that you made, and share it with others. REstaurants use recipes because it allows them to make the same dish, exactly the same way, and with the same results. It also allows them to hire new employes and know that the product will be the same.

I have a whole list of recipes in my "Soup, Stew, & Chowders" cookbook that allows me to teach others the basics of building a great soup. The recipes also allowed me to try different ideas, and record the recipes that worked, and discard the ones that didn't.

Just as with any work, to be able to record what you've accomplished is an important part of cooking. Can I make chili, or New England boiled Dinner without a recipe? You betcha. But if I want the prize winning white chili from a couple years back, then I'd better follow the recipe I developed to make it. Otherwise, it will taste a bit different every time I make it.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:12 PM   #27
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Thank you Chief Longwind Of The North. Yes, I do agree with you that recipes can be a very big asset. Since I have started my blog (52 soup recipes in 52 weeks), 1.5 month ago, I have received recipes from France, US, The Netherlands & Israel. Quite some recipes were amazing with ingredients which were new to me or more often the combinations were new to me. So yes let us be thankful for recipes as well

ps sorry for my English, it's not perfect yet but do hope you understand what I am trying to say.....


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I agree with both Claire's. Great soup is so easy to make. But don't scoff at recipes. Sometimes, just every once in a while, you make something that comes out amazing. And with a recipe, you can recreate that amaizing soup, or whatever it is that you made, and share it with others. REstaurants use recipes because it allows them to make the same dish, exactly the same way, and with the same results. It also allows them to hire new employes and know that the product will be the same.

I have a whole list of recipes in my "Soup, Stew, & Chowders" cookbook that allows me to teach others the basics of building a great soup. The recipes also allowed me to try different ideas, and record the recipes that worked, and discard the ones that didn't.

Just as with any work, to be able to record what you've accomplished is an important part of cooking. Can I make chili, or New England boiled Dinner without a recipe? You betcha. But if I want the prize winning white chili from a couple years back, then I'd better follow the recipe I developed to make it. Otherwise, it will taste a bit different every time I make it.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:20 PM   #28
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Thank you for sharing! I love Osem

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Old 01-03-2012, 05:41 PM   #29
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I made my take on Dawglover's soup on Saturday. I didn't have edamene or broccoli, but more or less did the same I did otherwise (turkey stock + chicken stock, chopped chicken etc.). That soup is a winner. I'm sure if you followed Dawglover's recipe, it would turn out. I do it by "taste and by golly."

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...oup-76634.html
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:46 PM   #30
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Another soup--blasphemy--not homemade, is to take a can of clam chowder, add some cooked (or canned) shrimp, canned oysters, frozen white fish, that fake crab, and smoked oysters or mussels (drained), red pepper flakes, splash of sherry or white wine. Add more milk/cream as needed and more cooked cubed potatoes. Garnished with some fresh lemon zest, fresh lemon juice, parsley, butter, pepper, splash of more fresh lemon juice or sherry. I do this at my parents' house to use up the canned clam chowder (the white stuff--must be New England style--they have tons of "red" style as well)--it is a great way to get rid of frozen shrimp, fish, canned fish, etc. And, it is tasty.
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:12 PM   #31
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Thank you for sharing! I love Osem
Oh, you are welocome.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:38 AM   #32
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So pleased to find this thread today, cuz I need to make "clean-the-fridge soup".

So far into the food processor, then into pot with olive oil is:

onion, celery, carrot, white radish, potato.

I have yet to add a big bunch of kale....and then what? tomatoes probably. I'd love to make a soup without tomatoes once in awhile, but find myself always reaching for those red deliciousnesses. Oh wait, I found a box of organic chicken broth.....maybe some mushrooms, thyme and garlic to go in.....

I have a hard time stopping adding ingredients to my soups, and they usually all taste the same.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:26 PM   #33
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Use different seasoning and even the same ingredient soup will taste differently.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:46 PM   #34
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So pleased to find this thread today, cuz I need to make "clean-the-fridge soup".

So far into the food processor, then into pot with olive oil is:

onion, celery, carrot, white radish, potato.

I have yet to add a big bunch of kale....and then what? tomatoes probably. I'd love to make a soup without tomatoes once in awhile, but find myself always reaching for those red deliciousnesses. Oh wait, I found a box of organic chicken broth.....maybe some mushrooms, thyme and garlic to go in.....

I have a hard time stopping adding ingredients to my soups, and they usually all taste the same.
Hihi:stop adding all these ingedients and try to think of a specific soup you could make. I promise you they will not taste the same anymore

As for the kale, add a red onion, small sweet potato, and brocoli, season with cumin seeds and coriander seeds, salt , pepper and lime. Cook for 20 min and liquidise the soup. Enjoy with a swirl of creme fraiche and some drops of lime.
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Old 02-09-2012, 02:04 PM   #35
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Thanks for the tips!

I had some of it for lunch, but there's plenty left. Here's what it looks like. At the last minute, I added two slices of ham, diced. Mostly I wanted to make green soup, since there was lots of kale, and some bok choi in the fridge.

It's pretty tasty, with no seasonings except s,p and fresh garlic. I will add more seasonings later, as I serve it.

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Old 02-09-2012, 02:07 PM   #36
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I made a batch of black bean soup with andouille sausage the other day. I just finished off a bowl for lunch.
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Old 02-09-2012, 03:06 PM   #37
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I made a batch of black bean soup with andouille sausage the other day. I just finished off a bowl for lunch.
Recipe or method posted anywhere?
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Old 02-09-2012, 05:16 PM   #38
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I have a soup that I bet noe of you have tried, because I created it for one of my cookbooks. Before i give it to you, let me tell you a story of someone who made it, my daughter Sprout.

She decided to make this soup for the first time, for a pot luck. So she followed the directions, step by step. When all but the last few ingredients were cooked into the soup, she decided to taste it, just to see how it was coming along. She didn't like it. She was beginning to think that her dear old dad had created a flop. But she decided to add the last few ingredients, and give it a chance. After everything was in the soup, and had cooked long enough for the flavors to blend, she was very happy with the soup. The last ingredient she added was the cheese. This ingredient added the salt flavor that the soup needed. But if she had added the salt before adding the cheese, then, when it was added, it would have made the soup too salty. She reported this to me after the soup was made, and eaten by the pot luck group. She also told me that everyone thought it was great. Me, I was relieved that someone besides me liked the soup.

Here it is, directly from my cookbook, in all of its strange glory.

Havarti with Tomato, Tofu, & Herbs Soup
Ready to try something new? I thought so. I'm going to introduce you to an ingredient that you would normally wouldn't eat. But when you use it in this soup, you will have a new appreciation for it.
But before I tell you what it is, I'm going to tell you something about it. It's high in protein, vitamins, minerals, isoflavones, and a host of other nutrients. Though it isn't fat free, it is low fat. It tends to capture the flavor of ingredients used with it. It has a rather bland flavor of its own, but is great for thickening creamy soups and fruit smoothies.
What is this miracle ingredient? I'm glad you asked. It is Silken-Firm Tofu. Now before you move on to the next recipe, remember, tofu has very little flavor of its own. In this soup, it is used as a thickening agent. The cheese, herbs, spices, and tomato provide all the flavor this soup can handle. Try it. Taste it and make your own decision. You just might be surprised.
Ingredients:
1 cup Grape or Cherry Tomatoes, halved
1 cup Silken Firm Tofu
2 cups Chicken Stock or Broth
2 cloves Fresh Garlic, minced
2 tsp. Sweet Basil
1/8 tsp. Oregano
2 tsp. Salt
1/8 tsp. Thyme
1/4 tsp. Black Pepper
8 oz. Havarti Cheese, cubed into bite-size chunks
Heat the broth over a medium flame until simmering. Add the garlic, herbs, and spices. Blend in the tofu with a wire whisk or immersion blender until smooth. Add the tomatoes and let simmer for 15 minutes.
When the soup is served, add the cheese cubes to the bowls. Serve with your favorite gelatin flavor (jello) and some whipped cream.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-09-2012, 06:38 PM   #39
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My pleasure!

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...tml#post898725
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Old 02-09-2012, 06:43 PM   #40
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