"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Stews
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-16-2008, 07:46 PM   #41
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
I start with salt pork. Rinse to remove excess salt. then cube it and cook over low heat to render the fat. Remove the salt pork from the pot. Dredge the beef in seasoned flour and brown in the rendered fat. Add bacon grease or butter if needed. When browned, add a cup or two of red wine, 1 generous tablespoon of tomato paste and beef stock (or canned beef broth) to barely cover the meat. Add the cooked salt pork back to the pot. Cover and braise over medium low heat for an hour. Remove from heat, add salt, pepper and herbs to taste (I use marjoram, thyme, bay leaves, garlic, etc). Don't oversalt or overseason. You'll have a chance to correct the seasonings later. Add vegetables (onions, potatoes, carrots, celery, etc). Add more stock, if needed. Transfer to oven, cover and cook at 275 degrees for at least 3 or 4 hours, until meat is very tender. You can add fresh mushrooms during the last 1/2 hour, if desired. Transfer all the meat and vegetables to a large serving dish. Taste the broth and correct seasonings, if necessary. Make a thin paste of flour and water (stir or strain the lumps out). Bring broth to a low boil and add the flour mixture a little at a time, in a slow stream - stirring or whisking constantly. It should thicken fairly quickly (a couple of minutes). Repeat until you have the consistency you want. Pour it over the meat and serve.
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2008, 08:39 PM   #42
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 150
Why bother flambeing ?? Except when the flames will affect the result, In this case I can't see how it will change the stew. The alcohol will evaporate anyway. I do flambe dishes and use a big swiss rechaud made by Spring Brothers so I think I understand the concept. Table side cooking is one thing ,but getting your smoke detector pissed off for no reason is another. Done wrong in a high sided pot could get one a really nice burn. Am I missing something ??? Gage
gage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2008, 12:39 AM   #43
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,577
hey, the flambeing , sounds like a great idea..........lighten (get it) up...........:):)........just need to make a stew and try it........only been here a week and finally the temps are getting cool enough to where it sounds wonderful
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 08:40 AM   #44
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
If you use some meat with bones (shanks) when you make beef stew, you could leave out the broth I think?
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 12:17 PM   #45
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 150
are you suggesting an oso bocco style stew or a stew with two different types of meat ?
gage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 12:27 PM   #46
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by gage View Post
are you suggesting an oso bocco style stew or a stew with two different types of meat ?
Yes.. I actually made it a few days ago...
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 01:27 PM   #47
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 150
was that an oso-bocco ?
or two different types of meat ? --Gage
gage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 03:39 PM   #48
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by gage View Post
was that an oso-bocco ?
or two different types of meat ? --Gage
more or less an osso buco, but i know my mother also made it with two different types of meat in the past.
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2008, 05:20 PM   #49
Head Chef
 
Leolady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by FincaPerlitas View Post
I start with salt pork. Rinse to remove excess salt. then cube it and cook over low heat to render the fat. Remove the salt pork from the pot. Dredge the beef in seasoned flour and brown in the rendered fat. Add bacon grease or butter if needed. When browned, add a cup or two of red wine, 1 generous tablespoon of tomato paste and beef stock (or canned beef broth) to barely cover the meat. Add the cooked salt pork back to the pot. Cover and braise over medium low heat for an hour. Remove from heat, add salt, pepper and herbs to taste (I use marjoram, thyme, bay leaves, garlic, etc). Don't oversalt or overseason. You'll have a chance to correct the seasonings later. Add vegetables (onions, potatoes, carrots, celery, etc). Add more stock, if needed. Transfer to oven, cover and cook at 275 degrees for at least 3 or 4 hours, until meat is very tender. You can add fresh mushrooms during the last 1/2 hour, if desired.
I do this also, but I flour my meat first and I use bacon rather than salt pork.

I also use a little worcheshire sauce, red wine, bay leaves, tomato paste, and rather than beef stock, I use chicken stock!

My family loves loves loves my beef stew. Especially if I make it one day, and serve it the next.
__________________
The luster of shiny new appliances can't compete with the virtues of Vintage: namely durability, simplicity, superior cooking and a cool retro look. https://leoladyshousecollectiblesandg....blogspot.com/
https://leoladysw.blogspot.com/
Leolady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 10:37 PM   #50
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
Can you add some flour at the end, if you decide to thicken the stew? Is it better to mix the flour with boiling water before adding it?

Second, does anyone use leeks for flavour?
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 10:39 PM   #51
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: southern california
Posts: 764
Me, the chef!
dave the baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:00 PM   #52
Head Chef
 
MexicoKaren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bucerias, Nayarit, Mexico
Posts: 1,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argamemnon
Can you add some flour at the end, if you decide to thicken the stew? Is it better to mix the flour with boiling water before adding it?
You can always thicken your stew toward the end, but don't add the flour directly or mix it with hot water. Mix it with cold water (at least 3-4 times as much water as flour) and either shake it well in a jar with the lid on or put it in your blender. If it isn't smooth when you put it in the stew, it will create lumps. Then, be sure at let it cook at least another 10-15 minutes to cook the flour and get the flavors to blend. Start with a couple tablespoons of flour in a half cup of water and see how it goes.

Leeks are great - be sure to clean them really well so you don't have gritty stew.
__________________
Saludos, Karen
MexicoKaren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:03 PM   #53
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Using flower as a thickener at the end is tricky and hard to do. Instead you can use instant mashed potato flakes as a thickener or make a rue and add it in.
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:06 PM   #54
Head Chef
 
MexicoKaren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bucerias, Nayarit, Mexico
Posts: 1,914
Good point, Buddy. Making a rue is an especially great idea and I've never done it that way. I will try it next time. Thanks!
__________________
Saludos, Karen
MexicoKaren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:09 PM   #55
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central Ohio
Posts: 3,130
I often add Guiness to mine of which gets many compliments.
__________________
"Many people have eaten my cooking & gone on to lead Normal lives."

deelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:28 PM   #56
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
Not recommended since the flour thickener needs to be fully cooked into the gravy otherwise it leaves a raw floury taste. Flour always should be added to a liquid and mixed before adding to the hot gravy/drippings or it will lump.

I actually will use ClearJelŽ to thicken since it leaves no taste or discoloration.
__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2009, 11:34 PM   #57
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
You can avoid that problem with the rue. Mix equal parts butter and flour in a pan on high heat, lower the heat and add in liquid from the stew. Whisk until smooth on high heat again, then add back into the stew.
It will have the same flavor as the stew and no flour taste. If you just mix the flour with juice from the stew then add back in then yes you will have flour taste in it. Using the rue cooks it thus removing the flour taste.
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2009, 04:21 AM   #58
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
Thanks Maverick. It's spelled roux I think, not rue

By the way when you say equal parts of butter and flour, how exactly do you know that the amounts are equal, do you actually measure it?
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2009, 04:22 AM   #59
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Yea... I'm not known for my spelling abilities! LOL even with speelchicker helping me! ;)
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2009, 04:27 AM   #60
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 318
Sorry, I editted my message almost at the same time you answered, lol..
Argamemnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.