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Old 11-23-2021, 11:39 AM   #1
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Have you ever noticed

This is not a thread to create an argument; simply an observation. In Texas. and New Mexico, beans of any kind are a no-no in chili. However, they are so popular everywhere else where people eat chili, that it is difficult to find the flavorful dish without them. Even fast food, and chain restaurants put beans in their chili (think Burger King, Wendy's, Chil's, etc.) Major companies sell beans especially made for chili. All commercial canned chili has varieties with beans. Commonly used beans in chili can include navy beans, red beans, black beans, dark red, or light red kidney beans, and pinto beans. It seems like beans are a big thing in chili, and that there are more recipes with beans, than without.

Me with, or without, I love chili either way. Just don't make mine Ohio/lower East Michigan style, i.e. sweet. And If I'm looking for a beanless chili, well a good bowl of Texas Red is amazing.

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Old 11-23-2021, 01:23 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North[/QUOTE
...Just don't make mine Ohio/lower East Michigan style, i.e. sweet...
Ohio chili is sweet? Born, raised, and spent my best years in Ohio and never ate a sweet chili. Sometimes Mom made it spicy enough it would blow your socks off. As a kid, I would occasionally add milk to it to cool it off.
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Old 11-23-2021, 02:25 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
...Just don't make mine Ohio/lower East Michigan style, i.e. sweet...
Ohio chili is sweet? Born, raised, and spent my best years in Ohio and never ate a sweet chili. Sometimes Mom made it spicy enough it would blow your socks off. As a kid, I would occasionally add milk to it to cool it off.[/QUOTE]

OK, after doing a bit of research, I find that first off, I was referencing Cincinnati chili, and though it's not really sweet, it does contain cinnamon, and allspice, with the ground beef finely minced. To me, it tastes sweet. The Eastern half of lower Michigan prefers chili the same way. My youngest daughter lives in Kentwood, right next to Grand Rapids. She says that everyone likes sweet chili there. I tried it and didn't care for it. She served up my white chili recipe at a couple of chili cook-offs at her church. People told her it was the best chili at the cook-off. It was disqualified because chili isn't supposed to be white.

Thank you CG for the correction.

One thing I know for certain, the Red Wings rule!

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-23-2021, 02:35 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Ohio chili is sweet? Born, raised, and spent my best years in Ohio and never ate a sweet chili. Sometimes Mom made it spicy enough it would blow your socks off. As a kid, I would occasionally add milk to it to cool it off.
OK, after doing a bit of research, I find that first off, I was referencing Cincinnati chili, and though it's not really sweet, it does contain cinnamon, and allspice, with the ground beef finely minced. To me, it tastes sweet. The Eastern half of lower Michigan prefers chili the same way. My youngest daughter lives in Kentwood, right next to Grand Rapids. She says that everyone likes sweet chili there. I tried it and didn't care for it. She served up my white chili recipe at a couple of chili cook-offs at her church. People told her it was the best chili at the cook-off. It was disqualified because chili isn't supposed to be white.

Thank you CG for the correction.

One thing I know for certain, the Red Wings rule!

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North[/QUOTE]

Ah geeze, Chief.

Now you have planted, into my mind, that Ohio chili is sweet. Never again will I be able to order chili in Ohio. Shame on you!!!

Ross
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Old 11-24-2021, 01:30 AM   #5
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The chile dishes served by longtime residents in their original territory (Mexico, New Mexico) tend not to have beans included. They love beans, but serve them on the side. Tomatoes are often not an ingredient. At Jemez Pueblo, where they've been growing chile for centuries, they make it without tomatoes or beans. The preferred meat is cabrito (young goat) or deer. They make green chile in a similar way. Beans are served on the side, with oven bread, cheese, and home-canned peaches.

My darling (born in Texas) makes chili (note spelling) with ground beef and pork, tomatoes, and beans. It's good. But not the same.
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Old 11-24-2021, 09:12 AM   #6
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Iīm making a chile con carne today, but it wonīt be a Cinci Chile served over spaghetti. No way Chile con Carne is my ultimate comfort food - absolutely love the stuff.
I use Mexican dried chiles (if I can get them) like Ancho or Guajillo; a tsp or two of annato powder, cumin, oregano, fresh serrano chiles, tomatoes, peppers,... and beans, usually red kidney beans. the flavours are enhanced with dark chocolate and a touch of coffee.
I canīt say Iīve ever been to Texas or New Mexico, so I canīt comment on customs there. In Mexico City, however, any beans were served as a side, generally refried rather than whole. Oh - thereīs no such thing as Chile con Carne in Mexico City
As for how to spell chile - I donīt really think it matters, as long as weīre clear on what the meaning is. I always spell it with an "e" at the end, because thatīs how itīs spelled in Mexico, but Chili, Chilli, Chilly - whatever rocks your boat!
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Old 11-24-2021, 10:50 AM   #7
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From the 50's I don't remember having Chili can Carne until we moved to Minn.

Before that it was usually Hash - Man! could my mom make a hash! I think it was the meal I loved the most - certainly remember it above all else.
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Old 11-24-2021, 12:35 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
As for how to spell chile - I donīt really think it matters, as long as weīre clear on what the meaning is. I always spell it with an "e" at the end, because thatīs how itīs spelled in Mexico, but Chili, Chilli, Chilly - whatever rocks your boat!
It does matter how you spell it!

According to my native New Mexican born Hispanic husband, the word chili and the dish chili does not exist in New Mexico. Chile refers to the vegetable, green chile. Red chile is letting the green chile stay on the plant until it turns red. Chile is the only spelling in New Mexico. Pinto beans are sacred and are only served as a side.
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Old 11-24-2021, 01:20 PM   #9
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I've always gone by the rule: If it ends in an "I" it's a meal and if it ends in an "E" it's a vegetable. If it ends in a "Y" it's a commentary on the temperature.
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Old 11-24-2021, 01:30 PM   #10
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I've always gone by the rule: If it ends in an "I" it's a meal and if it ends in an "E" it's a vegetable. If it ends in a "Y" it's a commentary on the temperature.
ditto the "Y" for sure! and the rest certainly makes sense.
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