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Old 02-04-2020, 11:39 AM   #1
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ISO wall oven fan to suck all cooking smell outside?

Given that I have an open plan kitchen/dining room, each time I cook with my oven it transfers all the odour into the kitchen, which spreads throughout the house. The oven is clean, but if I cook on high e.g. to crisp the skin of a roast chicken, then the house chokes up for the remainder of the day.

My portable air-conditioner has a large diameter hose that ventilates the hot air outside of my room, so why doesn't my oven, why are there vents on the outside of it, why not have an enclosed oven that vents all of its odour outside of the house?

I checked out the General Electric "Advantium" (https://www.geappliances.com/ge/advantium-oven.htm) which seems to be a mini oven that fits below a cabinet area where a ventilation hood would be fitted and I guess that sucks the oven odour strait out, but I've yet to confirm that, does anybody know?

I have been told many a story of old wall oven fittings being torn out from 60s interior that did vent oven odour outside, but commercial manufactured units are now built to plug-&-play into specific spaces, so there's no chance of the custom exhaust fan fitting needed.

Is there a domestic company that can offer such a setup: simply to suck all expelled cooking odours out from the oven (a fume hood above the oven does not count), except for the cooking smells released when the door it opened, of course?

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Old 02-17-2020, 12:51 AM   #2
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Our old Thermador wall oven vented outside. No heat and no cooking odor in the kitchen. But when time came to replace the oven with a new unit we couldn’t find anything that vented outside so we settled with a new wall unit that vented like all others. What we do now is run the range hood vent which vents outdoors every time we use the oven. It helps somewhat in sucking the heat and odor out of the kitchen.
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Old 02-17-2020, 07:04 PM   #3
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That seems to be the story everywhere these days.

Making money from something that just plugs in and works is what drove that market decision.
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Old 02-17-2020, 07:48 PM   #4
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It would be really nice to have an oven that vented outside, but with a switch to vent inside in winter. In winter, I would rather have the heat and live with the smells. In summer, I would rather not have the oven fighting with the AC. For now, with the heat going into the kitchen, I bake just about everything in the toaster oven in summer, because it doesn't add as much heat to my kitchen. But, an oven that vented outside would be even better.
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:12 PM   #5
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I wonder why people want the aroma of good food out of the house? I don't mind waking up in the morning to the smells of the night before! My ovens vent up behind the range (into the range hood), and the only times I turn the hood on to suck out the heat, is when I don't want heat. I'm another who rarely bakes in the summer - either the toaster oven, or even my gas grill, outside.
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Old 02-18-2020, 10:47 AM   #6
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Perhaps due to safety codes these outdoor venting wall ovens were phased out.
Even our kitchen’s 30-inch, built-in lava rock
gas grill is no longer available since who knows how long ago. I bet all due to safety codes.
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Old 02-18-2020, 10:50 AM   #7
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Often ovens can burn foodstuffs, which nobody wants to smell. I know that means the oven is dirty, but still, it's an odour likely vented out with an open window when it occurs, so why let it in in the first place.

I appreciate the conflict with other devices such as air conditioners, but odour does play a lasting role in the home and even during the process it would interrupt other fragrances in each room, cooking smells are best outside of the home.

I appreciate the idea of retaining heat in winter, as it is very cold right now, but I could open the oven door for that.
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Old 02-18-2020, 11:50 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by hueberttix View Post
...I appreciate the conflict with other devices such as air conditioners, but odour does play a lasting role in the home and even during the process it would interrupt other fragrances in each room, cooking smells are best outside of the home.
This statement baffles me, since one of my favorite things about cooking is the wonderful aromas that are produced while cooking so many of the foods. Who doesn't love the aroma of bread baking? That would be one of those wonderful things that an oven venting outside would remove. I almost wish that I could channel those aromas to the inside, when I'm grilling things outside, they smell so good!! If only I could filter out the smoke...
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Old 02-18-2020, 12:21 PM   #9
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I worked with a man from India. He told me in India, most all households have a kitchen located in a totally separate structure close to the main house.
He said he had a covered walkway that led to the kitchen.
He told me the two major reasons they do it this way.

1) Keep cooking odors out of the house completely.
2) To keep the men from interfering or trying to cook themselves. The kitchen was off limits to the men in the family. That included boys.

When I first heard this, I thought it was silly.
Today if I were to build a new house, the kitchen would be connected to the house, but in a location far from the living quarters and excellent exhaust capabilities. I now think the idea was fantastic.
I cannot stand to smell fried chicken all night long and imagine how much of this odor permeates furniture and clothing.
The Indians have it right!
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Old 02-18-2020, 01:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I worked with a man from India. He told me in India, most all households have a kitchen located in a totally separate structure close to the main house.
He said he had a covered walkway that led to the kitchen.
He told me the two major reasons they do it this way.

1) Keep cooking odors out of the house completely.
2) To keep the men from interfering or trying to cook themselves. The kitchen was off limits to the men in the family. That included boys.

When I first heard this, I thought it was silly.
Today if I were to build a new house, the kitchen would be connected to the house, but in a location far from the living quarters and excellent exhaust capabilities. I now think the idea was fantastic.
I cannot stand to smell fried chicken all night long and imagine how much of this odor permeates furniture and clothing.
The Indians have it right!
That was common in many places through the centuries, especially in southern and tropical countries and states that had hot summers and warm or mild winters. It was primarily to keep the heat from cooking fires out of the main house, and also to keep kitchen fires from burning down the entire house.

The kitchen doesn't have to be in a separate building to keep men out
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Old 02-18-2020, 01:58 PM   #11
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Another reason is when cooking with firewood, in case of fire the living quarters will be safe and away from a structure fire.
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Old 02-18-2020, 06:45 PM   #12
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I enjoy cooking smells while I'm cooking or eating, then I'm done with them and don't want them around anymore.

When I'm doing a 12 hr cook of crockpot caramelized onions, it's plugged in on an outdoor table. The smell of onions cooking gets overwhelming really fast.
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Old 02-18-2020, 06:59 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I worked with a man from India. He told me in India, most all households have a kitchen located in a totally separate structure close to the main house.
He said he had a covered walkway that led to the kitchen.
He told me the two major reasons they do it this way.

1) Keep cooking odors out of the house completely.
2) To keep the men from interfering or trying to cook themselves. The kitchen was off limits to the men in the family. That included boys.

When I first heard this, I thought it was silly.
Today if I were to build a new house, the kitchen would be connected to the house, but in a location far from the living quarters and excellent exhaust capabilities. I now think the idea was fantastic.
I cannot stand to smell fried chicken all night long and imagine how much of this odor permeates furniture and clothing.
The Indians have it right!
I think that you're right about that. For me, I would build the kitchen on the roof so that the oils would escape and there would be less cleaning.
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Old 02-18-2020, 10:36 PM   #14
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I enjoy cooking smells while I'm cooking or eating, then I'm done with them and don't want them around anymore....
And this is why we never eat in our hotel room when we're traveling. Cold food is fine, but don't bring anything warm with a full-bodied smell into the room I want to fall asleep in. Honestly, there are times I know whatever I'm cooking will perfume the entire house, so I go upstairs and close bedroom doors.

I swear our next house will be a one-story with an exhaust fan strong enough it could suck Himself right up to it when it's on High.
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Old 02-19-2020, 01:00 AM   #15
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And this is why we never eat in our hotel room when we're traveling. Cold food is fine, but don't bring anything warm with a full-bodied smell into the room I want to fall asleep in. Honestly, there are times I know whatever I'm cooking will perfume the entire house, so I go upstairs and close bedroom doors.

I swear our next house will be a one-story with an exhaust fan strong enough it could suck Himself right up to it when it's on High.

It would be easier if you made him take Beano.
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Old 02-19-2020, 02:13 AM   #16
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Lol! This doesn't have anything to do with Himself, Kayelle. Rather, I'm interested in a fan that can move 240# worth of bulk! Imagine how efficient it would be with cooking odors.
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Old 02-19-2020, 10:55 AM   #17
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A whole house fan also works great. On high setting it can suck everything out of the house that’s not secured...lol
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Old 02-19-2020, 04:06 PM   #18
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Do you have an exterior wall in your cooking space? They make though the wall exhaust fans like this one in a variety of sizes and configurations. It might get some air flow out of your room

https://www.amazon.com/Broan-512M-Th.../dp/B000LNKUN8
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Old 02-19-2020, 04:30 PM   #19
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I installed one of these in a hallway window last year. Very effective, Suck air out of entire house or bring fresh in. Be sure to open at least one window at the other end of the house for thorough ventilation
Air King 9166F 20" Whole House Window Fan https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007Q3RQ6..._OEAtEbDCYNP1D
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Old 02-21-2020, 06:47 PM   #20
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Interesting idea, but very loud by user review accounts.

With a built in option the internal fan should mask much of the noise that it would otherwise make, and of course the cooking smells wouldn't escape.

It's an interesting stop gap roadfix, but I think Janet H's smaller fan is more practical for me.
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