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Old 03-23-2015, 04:02 PM   #1
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Anyone make their own mustard??

Hey everyone,

I got a new batch of Sauerkraut going and thought it would be great to make my own mustard as well. Sure I could scope out the internet to find a recipe, but curious if anyone has attempted it themselves and can share.

Ideally Id like to start with mustard seeds , as I have an over abundance of them.

Any suggestions welcome,

larry

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Old 03-23-2015, 05:00 PM   #2
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I have made mustard but you need some lead time. it really needs to sit for a few days to mellow. The freshly made stuff is an outrageously hot and acrid mess, imo.

Intersting reading here: How to Make Mustard and here: Whole-Grain Dijon Mustard Recipe - CHOW.com
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Old 03-23-2015, 05:06 PM   #3
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I've used mustard powder, brown sugar (or maple syrup or honey), pickling salt, and oil. If I remember, you heat the mustard seeds in oil until they pop and add them after the mustard has had a chance to blend overnight. Honey mustard is what I usually have to make because my dad can't find his favourite brand anymore. I have made a maple mustard with brown mustard seeds in it. Easy-peasy to make and you control the ingredients!
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Old 03-23-2015, 05:25 PM   #4
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I make almost all of my own condiments from scratch, including mustard. I'm actually heading out right now, or I would post more, but here is a good book with a lot of recipes in it that I would recommend....

http://www.amazon.com/Homemade-Condi...QNZT5JCPD5FPQW
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:13 PM   #5
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I don't have proportions, but every time I throw this sweet/hot mustard together it's good. We have horseradish plants, so it's one of my stock Christmas gifts....

Soak mustard seeds (yellow and some brown if I have them) in white wine vinegar for awhile (several hours to a couple of days). Blend the heck out of them, with horseradish and honey to taste. Maybe a titch of salt.
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Old 03-24-2015, 06:15 AM   #6
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I buy Coleman mustard powder and use their recipe. It's really hot.


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Old 03-24-2015, 07:49 AM   #7
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Just a trivia note of interest.

Canada provides more than 90% of the mustard seed for the world.

Just one of those useless facts in the back of my mind. This is the first time I have been able to use it.
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:58 AM   #8
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I've made mustard for years. I've made many different recipes.
 This one has given the tastiest consistent result: It tastes like pricey Moutarde de Meaux Pommery.
Soak 1/3 cup brown mustard seeds in 1 cup water overnight. Must be brown seeds.THEN the next day add 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar (I've used basic white table vinegar with little difference in flavor), 2 tablespoons local (real) honey not the faux honey you get at Costco, and 1 1/2 teaspoons Kosher salt (don't use iodised salt) and blend in a coffee bean grinder until the mixture looks creamy but a bit 'grainy', (a food processor does not yield the same result. Store in the refrigerator; the mustard will be very hot at first but will mellow with time.
Of special note! The colder the water is the hotter the finished mustard will be. For a tasty mellow mustard use warm to hot tap water. This is b/c the chemical reaction that takes place the instant the water touches the mustard seed 'sets' the reaction somehow. I've tried using cold water and hot water and the difference in the 'heat' of the finished mustard is very obvious. I don't care for hot mustard so I use hot water.
Ideally the mustard ought to be allowed to condition in the fridge for at least a month before using. I always have a new mustard tucked away in the back of the fridge for use when the current one is used up.
As in so many foods the homemade results are night and day better than any store bought brand.
I always triple the recipe b/c my adult kids were always tapping me for more mustard.
Now I make extra jars to give them.
This mustard also makes a nice gift for a friend and or family member.
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Old 03-24-2015, 11:43 AM   #9
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Interesting topic. Learning a lot here. I thought you just followed the instructions on the tin of Keen's Mustard:

For the table
"Mix gradually with cold water to the consistency of very thick cream, stirring well and breaking up all lumps.
After mixing, the mustard should stand 10 minutes to develop full flavour."

I'm not a big fan of mustard as a condiment. I use it mostly as an ingredient and usually from seed, but sometimes from powder. (Okay, I use a bit of prepared Dijon both as ingredient and condiment.)
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Old 03-24-2015, 12:38 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Interesting topic. Learning a lot here. I thought you just followed the instructions on the tin of Keen's Mustard:

For the table
"Mix gradually with cold water to the consistency of very thick cream, stirring well and breaking up all lumps.
After mixing, the mustard should stand 10 minutes to develop full flavour."

I'm not a big fan of mustard as a condiment. I use it mostly as an ingredient and usually from seed, but sometimes from powder. (Okay, I use a bit of prepared Dijon both as ingredient and condiment.)
I don't ever use mustard as a condiment. Mayo and or butter for me. I do add some dry mustard to my mac and cheese. And that is it for me. I keep a small bottle of Gulden's on hand for anyone who wants to use it as a condiment.
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Old 03-24-2015, 03:12 PM   #11
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Cajun Mustard

Ingredients:

2oz dry mustard
1 Tbs cornstarch
¼ cup water
1 clove garlic, minced
3 Tbs white wine vinegar
1 Tbs honey
1 Tbs crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp coarse black pepper
1 tsp paprika
Instructions:

Combine the dry mustard and flour. Gradually stir in 1/4 cup cold water and let stand 15 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Makes about ½ cup.
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Old 03-24-2015, 05:02 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I buy Coleman mustard powder and use their recipe. It's really hot.


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The original Mr Colman is supposed to have said that he made his fortune from the mustard people left on their plates rather than the mustard they actually ate.

Like Addie, I have bits of useless but interesting trivia lurking in the back of my brain
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Old 03-24-2015, 05:55 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
The original Mr Colman is supposed to have said that he made his fortune from the mustard people left on their plates rather than the mustard they actually ate.

Like Addie, I have bits of useless but interesting trivia lurking in the back of my brain

That's interesting. I had heard it was Mr. French of French's mustard fame who said that. Either way, I believe it's a true statement.
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Old 03-25-2015, 07:43 AM   #14
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Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:07 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Interesting topic. Learning a lot here. I thought you just followed the instructions on the tin of Keen's Mustard:

For the table
"Mix gradually with cold water to the consistency of very thick cream, stirring well and breaking up all lumps.
After mixing, the mustard should stand 10 minutes to develop full flavour."

I'm not a big fan of mustard as a condiment. I use it mostly as an ingredient and usually from seed, but sometimes from powder. (Okay, I use a bit of prepared Dijon both as ingredient and condiment.)
The powder in the Keen's tin is already mustard. The water just liquefies the powder.
I'm talking about making real mustard from mustard seeds. Night and day difference.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:13 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
The mildest seeds are the yellow ones. Then the brown then the black. Black ones are used in Indian foods and are VERY hot!
My recipe calls for soaking the seeds (brown) overnight then adding the other ingredients then grinding in a coffee bean grinder. They grind up easily after soaking overnight. I like to leave some of the seeds just barely ground to give the finished result a 'grainy' texture which is traditional in many French mustards.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:40 AM   #17
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I just finished making another batch of mustard this morning. The photo is exactly like the mustard I make.
I'd post a photo of my mustard if I could figure out how it.Traditional Dijon Mustard In A Glass Jar Stock Photo, Picture And Royalty Free Image. Pic 20588946.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:54 AM   #18
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What's the point of leaving chinks of mustard seed in the mix rather than having a smooth purée?
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:03 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
In stores I see everything from the completely puréed French's style of yellow mustard to very grainy stone ground mustard (I assume this sort of what you'd get if you ground it in a mortar after the soaking). I like both textures for different things. A well stacked gourmet ham or salami sandwich needs some grainy, nicely flavored spicy mustard, while a basic hot dog screams for the plain old French's (with some sweet relish and chopped raw onion - maybe some diced jalapeño ).
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:07 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
The powder in the Keen's tin is already mustard. The water just liquefies the powder.
I'm talking about making real mustard from mustard seeds. Night and day difference.
I had picked up on that. I did say I was learning a lot in this thread.

Edit: I just checked. The stuff in the Keen's Mustard tin is just "double fine mustard", so I don't really understand what you mean by "It's already mustard", well so are mustard seeds. Isn't what you are talking about ground mustard plus other ingredients, like vinegar and salt? Certainly, stuff that is homemade and has added ingredients would very different from just adding water to mustard powder. Spices that are already ground don't have as much flavour as grinding them yourself.
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