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Old 11-04-2015, 11:28 PM   #21
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I just mentioned to Pirate Craig's idea of roasted garlic in the tartar sauce. His mouth started to salivate. One can never have too much garlic. And even more so for roasted garlic.

Gee, now I have to go clean up the drool.
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Old 11-04-2015, 11:35 PM   #22
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[QUOTE=GotGarlic;1442686]I agree, and I'm a vinegar fiend! DH likes malt vinegar with his fish 'n chips, though. In the UK, they also use primarily cod or haddock for this dish. We enjoyed it several times during our week in Ireland in 2003 [QUOTE]

Spike loves the Italian Red Wine Vinegar. For me it is Apple Cider or the Chinese vinegar. But not the ones that have sugar in them. But for the life of me I do not understand anyone who uses white vinegar for their food. Anytime I see a recipe that calls for it, I substitute Apple Cider vinegar.
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Old 11-04-2015, 11:54 PM   #23
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Spike loves the Italian Red Wine Vinegar. For me it is Apple Cider or the Chinese vinegar. But not the ones that have sugar in them. But for the life of me I do not understand anyone who uses white vinegar for their food. Anytime I see a recipe that calls for it, I substitute Apple Cider vinegar.
Have you ever tried it? One of the things we almost always had on the table when I was growing up was sliced cucumbers soaked in white vinegar. I loved it, and still do, although now I usually add a splash of cider vinegar and a pinch each of salt, sugar and cayenne.

At the beach house my mother rented for the family, my aunt (her sister) asked me to make it to have with dinner. It's an old family recipe!
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Old 11-05-2015, 12:10 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Have you ever tried it? One of the things we almost always had on the table when I was growing up was sliced cucumbers soaked in white vinegar. I loved it, and still do, although now I usually add a splash of cider vinegar and a pinch each of salt, sugar and cayenne.

At the beach house my mother rented for the family, my aunt (her sister) asked me to make it to have with dinner. It's an old family recipe!
A couple of times. My mother used it for the pickled beets with onions. But I do remember she would cut the vinegar with a bit of water. Now I can see having your mother's family recipe. The extreme sharpness if the white vinegar is cut with the addition of other items.
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Old 11-05-2015, 07:42 AM   #25
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Craig. I would love each recipe.



Then why use anything? You could use malt vinegar which I love on fried fish.
I find the more you add the better it gets.

Finely chopped onion.
Parsley.
Old Bay.
Hot sauce.
Lemon or lime juice.
Salt and pepper.
Mustard.
Relish.
Chopped pickles.
ect...................... You name it.

Many things would work well. I use what I have on hand and in many instances I don't make it because I don't have enough ingredients to make a decent tartar sauce.
Roasted garlic tartar sauce

+/- 1/2 cup roasted garlic cloves (about 2 medium heads)
1-1/2 cups mayo
1/4 cup sweet pickle relish
1 tablespoon fine diced onion
1 tablespoon fine diced red bell
1 tablespoon fine diced green bell
1 tablespoon whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons white wine
1/2 tsp each salt and pepper

Cut off top of heads and roast garlic with a drizzle of olive oil until soft and tender. Completely cool, squeeze garlic out, mash until smooth and place in a bowl. Add remainder of ingredients, mix until well blended and refrigerate for at least an hour to meld flavors.
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Old 11-05-2015, 05:18 PM   #26
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Chief's Tartar Sauce:

Mayo (sometimes homemade, sometimes Helman's)
Little bit of Garlic powder
Minced onion (optional)
Paprika
Sweet pickle Relish
Dill weed
Tarragon
Smallest bit of tomato puree for color

Tartar Sauce #2
Salad Dressing (Miracle Whip)
Prepared horseradish
Bit of Wasabi powder
Lemon Juice

Other sauces are great with fish as well. Peruse the mother sauce daughters, such as Sauce Bercy, or Sauce Poulette.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-06-2015, 08:58 AM   #27
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Tartar Sauce

Having seen all the versions of tartar sauce on this thread, I got curious to find out how the French make it - it is, after all, a French sauce!

This is what I found:

We're supposed to make our own mayo, olive oil, mustard, hard boiled egg yolk 1, and a tsp of mustard, not forgetting the salt.

The ingredients that go into the mayonnaise are:

pickled gherkins, capers, 1/2 a shallot all diced, chopped parsley, same of fresh tarragon, and same again of chives. salt and pepper. That's what the French consider tartar sauce should have in it. If you chop up the cooked egg white and add that, it is no longer 'Sauce Tartare', but transmogrifies into 'Sauce Gibriche'.

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Old 11-06-2015, 09:05 AM   #28
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Have you ever tried it? One of the things we almost always had on the table when I was growing up was sliced cucumbers soaked in white vinegar. I loved it, and still do, although now I usually add a splash of cider vinegar and a pinch each of salt, sugar and cayenne.

At the beach house my mother rented for the family, my aunt (her sister) asked me to make it to have with dinner. It's an old family recipe!
My mother made that, w/o the cayenne though. We do still make it occasionally and even an Asian version with fish sauce and rice wine.

I remember going to Arthur Treacher's when I was a kid (are there any still around?). My mother would douse her fish with malt vinegar. I always sat across the table from her to get as far away from the smell as possible.

Craig will find ways to use that roasted garlic tartar sauce. I'm not much for tartar sauce at all but I do like that one. It's from one of the Walt Disney World cookbooks, a really old one. I think it was served with blackened grouper in one of the resort hotel restaurants.

******Oh, looking at the recipe just reminded me, be judicious with the white wine as depending on how thick your mayo is it can make it kind of runny. *********

and Addie can leave it out altogether or add some water or chicken broth if it does need some thinning.
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:28 AM   #29
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I guess you don't really want to taste the fish...
Naturally I would not use ALL the ingredients at once. Or maybe I would. My point was all these things and more are suitable for making a tasty tartar sauce.
I also said I like malt vinegar on fried fish. I think malt vinegar is quite easy on the taste buds and it could not over power the fish.
All these things are a preference. My opinion if you will.

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Roasted garlic tartar sauce

+/- 1/2 cup roasted garlic cloves (about 2 medium heads)
1-1/2 cups mayo
1/4 cup sweet pickle relish
1 tablespoon fine diced onion
1 tablespoon fine diced red bell
1 tablespoon fine diced green bell
1 tablespoon whole grain mustard
2 tablespoons white wine
1/2 tsp each salt and pepper

Cut off top of heads and roast garlic with a drizzle of olive oil until soft and tender. Completely cool, squeeze garlic out, mash until smooth and place in a bowl. Add remainder of ingredients, mix until well blended and refrigerate for at least an hour to meld flavors.
Thanks Craig. How about the Remoulade sauce? I want to paste that into my recipe file too. TIA.

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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Chief's Tartar Sauce:

Mayo (sometimes homemade, sometimes Helman's)
Little bit of Garlic powder
Minced onion (optional)
Paprika
Sweet pickle Relish
Dill weed
Tarragon
Smallest bit of tomato puree for color

Tartar Sauce #2
Salad Dressing (Miracle Whip)
Prepared horseradish
Bit of Wasabi powder
Lemon Juice

Other sauces are great with fish as well. Peruse the mother sauce daughters, such as Sauce Bercy, or Sauce Poulette.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks Chief!
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:32 AM   #30
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Tartar sauce

I got curious to find out what the original French recipe for tartar sauce was, so, having the advantage of speaking fluent French, I visited a few French cookery sites, and they all said the same thing, namely:

mayonnaise made with olive oil incorporated into hard boiled egg yolks and mustard, seasoned with salt and pepper; Then mix in carefully diced
pickled gherkins, capers, and chopped parsley, tarragon and chives. That's the tartar sauce they do in France. If you add in the chopped cooked whites of the egg, then it turns miraculously into sauce gibriche!

I thought this might be of interest.

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Old 11-06-2015, 11:53 AM   #31
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My mother made that, w/o the cayenne though. We do still make it occasionally and even an Asian version with fish sauce and rice wine.
My mother's version was vinegar and salt only. I added the other ingredients.

I made an Asian version just last night, with rice vinegar, salt, sugar and cayenne. I'll try and remember to try it with fish sauce next time. It was really good with my Thai shrimp curry.
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:54 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I got curious to find out what the original French recipe for tartar sauce was, so, having the advantage of speaking fluent French, I visited a few French cookery sites, and they all said the same thing, namely:

mayonnaise made with olive oil incorporated into hard boiled egg yolks and mustard, seasoned with salt and pepper; Then mix in carefully diced
pickled gherkins, capers, and chopped parsley, tarragon and chives. That's the tartar sauce they do in France. If you add in the chopped cooked whites of the egg, then it turns miraculously into sauce gibriche!

I thought this might be of interest.

di reston

enough is never as good as a feast. Oscar Wilde
Thanks, Di! Good to know what the original inspiration was.
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:32 PM   #33
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Naturally I would not use ALL the ingredients at once. Or maybe I would. My point was all these things and more are suitable for making a tasty tartar sauce.
I also said I like malt vinegar on fried fish. I think malt vinegar is quite easy on the taste buds and it could not over power the fish.
All these things are a preference. My opinion if you will.
Sorry, I had the impression you *were* saying you would add all of these ingredients. Of course, it's all about personal preference, and I enjoy strong flavors. There does come a point when it becomes too much, though.
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:34 PM   #34
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I have a recipe for ginger remoulade I just posted on its own thread. I generally use it with broiled or grilled salmon or tuna rather than fried white fish, but it's a good alternative to tartar sauce.

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ml#post1442972
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:49 PM   #35
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Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
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Old 11-06-2015, 02:17 PM   #36
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Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
Both of those recipes are available online.

http://jacksonville.com/entertainmen...emoulade-sauce

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/e...e-recipe2.html
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:54 PM   #37
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Sorry, I had the impression you *were* saying you would add all of these ingredients. Of course, it's all about personal preference, and I enjoy strong flavors. There does come a point when it becomes too much, though.
That would be another opinion as "to much" would be up to each individuals taste. Might be just right for one and "to much" or "not enough" for another.
I will check out the recipe you posted for ginger remoulade. Thanks.

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Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
Thank You!
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Old 11-07-2015, 01:22 PM   #38
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That would be another opinion as "to much" would be up to each individuals taste. Might be just right for one and "to much" or "not enough" for another.
Well, of course I would think that, even for you, there's a point where it's too much. Or maybe I should send you a bowl of the stuff I concocted when I was about four years old. It had practically everything I could pull out of the cabinet
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Old 11-07-2015, 06:45 PM   #39
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Thanks to all of you who posted recipes!
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Old 11-08-2015, 08:28 AM   #40
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Have you ever tried it? One of the things we almost always had on the table when I was growing up was sliced cucumbers soaked in white vinegar. I loved it, and still do, although now I usually add a splash of cider vinegar and a pinch each of salt, sugar and cayenne.

At the beach house my mother rented for the family, my aunt (her sister) asked me to make it to have with dinner. It's an old family recipe!
I used to do that for the kids as they were growing up. I kept it in the fridge along with celery and carrots sticks in a small jar. Kept the jar right at the front of the shelf so it was always the first thing they saw when they opened the door. Every morning they left for school and I got out the peeler and the veggies to replenish the supply. Very popular in my home.

I started out with keeping them in cold water. But they would grab the salt shaker. When I switched to the cider vinegar and watered down a bit, they stopped using the salt. One way to get veggies into the kiddies.
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