"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Condiments
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-22-2011, 02:03 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Uses for Chutney

I just bought a set with two jars of chutney. One is Date and Fig Chutney and the other is Mediterranean Chutney with Flame Grilled Peppers. I have never used chutney at home. Besides eating it in a restaurant I have no experience with pairing it with food. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what to serve these two chutneys with?

mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 02:43 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Bolas De Fraile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkaylady View Post
I just bought a set with two jars of chutney. One is Date and Fig Chutney and the other is Mediterranean Chutney with Flame Grilled Peppers. I have never used chutney at home. Besides eating it in a restaurant I have no experience with pairing it with food. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what to serve these two chutneys with?
The date and fig will be splendid with very strong hard cheese like Paski Sir, Cheddar, Manchego and Parm and a glass of gutsy red wine like a Rioja Alta, if the pepper chutney is spicy like Ajvar, burgers, kebabs or any grilled meat the drink has to be beer.
Life without Ajvar is life without freedom
My bramley apple chutney is unique because I use Cox's
__________________
I was married by a judge, I should have asked for a jury.
Bolas De Fraile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 05:45 AM   #3
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,610
Chutney makes a nice spread if mixed with cream cheese. Tea sandwich or dip for crackers. Works for sweet or savory.
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 12:57 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,651
I have used chutney to glaze chicken before serving. Ads a sweet tang. I have also put a few scoops in bbq sauce for pork and chicken. Makes things a bit interesting.
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 07:19 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,970
I use it with cream cheese, also, but am lazy and just pour it over. But I've also added vinegar and oil and made salad dressings, or to soy-based marinades. This is so simple when you're toward the bottom of the jar. Just add oil & vinegar (for the former) or soy sauce (for the latter), shake, et voila!
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 07:26 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,466
I used to make a cranberry chutney before I started making cranberry salsa as the side for turkey. I probably still have the recipe somewhere...I know it was most likely from Bon Appetit or Gourmet, modified.
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 01:23 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Charlottetown, PEI
Posts: 35
I usually pair it with cheese. Sometimes I add a splodge of tomato relish to guacamole.

I once gave a jar of tomato relish to a German friend, who misunderstood my suggestion about pairing it with cheese, and added it some pasta (OK, with some cheese). I didn't try the end product myself but she was delighted with the result.

Your Mediterranean Chutney might work well like this.

Or perhaps on toasted baguette / flat bread with grilled Brie, Camembert or other cheese. Also as a possible accompaniment to Naan Bread.

Mmm, now I'm hungry!
__________________
VegLover

Follow my 365 Day Mrs Beeton adventure at: https://mrsbeetonin365days.wordpress.com
VegLover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 02:09 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,503
For all of my self-proclaimed food knowledge and adventurous ways in the kitchen ~ I know pretty much ZERO about chutneys. The only one I've had recently is a homemade tomato-based one over baked halibut at a friend's house. I should call him and get the recipe ... come to think of it, why was it even called chutney and not, oh, a remoulade? or are those more cultural / naming differences?

But there has to be more to it then adding it to cheese and dipping? or am I just confused?
__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 04:48 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
The date and fig will be splendid with very strong hard cheese like Paski Sir, Cheddar, Manchego and Parm and a glass of gutsy red wine like a Rioja Alta, if the pepper chutney is spicy like Ajvar, burgers, kebabs or any grilled meat the drink has to be beer.
Life without Ajvar is life without freedom
My bramley apple chutney is unique because I use Cox's
I will try your suggestions or something similar. Thanks.

Oh, I don't know what Ajvar is? Can you elaborate?
mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 04:49 PM   #10
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Thanks for all the other responses. I guess I am not the only one in the dark about chutney.
mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2011, 05:05 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,466
Google U suggested I take a seminar from Wikipedia:

Chutney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 02:49 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Bolas De Fraile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkaylady View Post
I will try your suggestions or something similar. Thanks.

Oh, I don't know what Ajvar is? Can you elaborate?
ok roast red peppers, red chili's skin and de-seed put in a blender, add the pulp from roasted aubergines, some oil and lots of garlic cloves, blitz to a pulp then pour into a pan and cook slowly till it has reduced to a cream cheese consistency, then add a little vinegar.
__________________
I was married by a judge, I should have asked for a jury.
Bolas De Fraile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 07:33 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
ok roast red peppers, red chili's skin and de-seed put in a blender, add the pulp from roasted aubergines, some oil and lots of garlic cloves, blitz to a pulp then pour into a pan and cook slowly till it has reduced to a cream cheese consistency, then add a little vinegar.
The chutney I bought tastes like something like that would taste.
mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 10:01 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,503
I get what they are. What I don't really get is how they're used.

Are foods on the bland side so this is a way to perk them up? is it like adding ketchup or mustard or mayo (condiment style)? Do you cook a dish to go with your chutney? or a chutney to go with your dish? Is just like pouring chimichurri over a steak? Is it like having a gravy boat on the table to douse whatever you feel like needs it?
__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 10:20 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 25,436
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
When I had chutney, I would put it on the table with a meal for anyone to take some and use like a condiment. On the food or bites in between.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2011, 11:20 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zereh View Post
I get what they are. What I don't really get is how they're used.

Are foods on the bland side so this is a way to perk them up? is it like adding ketchup or mustard or mayo (condiment style)? Do you cook a dish to go with your chutney? or a chutney to go with your dish? Is just like pouring chimichurri over a steak? Is it like having a gravy boat on the table to douse whatever you feel like needs it?
All very good questions and what I was also wondering. I was wondering if I needed to cook something to go with that chutney I bought.
mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2011, 12:31 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,503
Ok, Google and I just had a little heart-to-heart and this is what I found. I guess I should just learn to search before asking ... I picked out the ones that sounded interesting and which actually offered up ideas on how to use it:


Chutneys are served on the side to accompany assorted curry dishes, or with cold meats - much the same ways as you'd use pickles or herb jellies. They are condiments. I like to toss in a spoonful or two of chutney into a meatloaf or meatballs just for a flavour change, or you can add some to a gravy for the same reason.

Use chutney with roast pork instead of apple sauce; with lamb instead of mint jelly; with turkey instead of cranberry sauce; with chicken nuggets instead of ketchup or sweet and sour sauce; with ham instead of mustard. Pour 1/4 cup over a block of cream cheese and serve with crackers or cocktail bread slices.

Mix 1 tablespoon into a mild vinaigrette to make a salad dressing.

Stir 1/4 cup or so into a pot of plain rice to make a pilaf.

Mix half mayonnaise and half chutney and serve on hamburgers.

Toss 1/4 cup with steamed broccoli, carrots or green beans.

Serve with baked sweet potatoes.

You can toss chutney or savoury jellies into sour cream or other base to make a dip. This mixture is delicious on jacket potatoes!

I've got heaps of pickle recipes - pickled mushrooms, pickled carrots, pickled this or that, and I often wonder how I'd serve them! I guess I'd just do it as I've described above, if ever I got around to making any.

As for the savoury jellies, they can be used as a condiment, on the edge of your plate to go with cold meats, or they can be spooned over hot vegetables for a flavour change. Personally, I think they're great on a sandwich with leftover, cold roast meats or chicken. I happen to like chutney or savoury jellies on a sandwich with cheese!

Really, uses are only limited by your imagination.
___

Cheese and chutney sandwiches. Must be good bread, preferably white, crusty, unsliced and good Cheddar. I usually make apple, rhubarb or green tomato since those are the things I get gluts of.
__

I also like chutney on turkey sandwiches, but then again, I like hot pepper jelly on turkey sandwiches too. I also like both on bagels with cream cheese.
Some of my chutney is sweet, some less so. All have the "hot" spices, either "savory hot" like peppers or sweet hot like ginger and cinnamon.

The tomato marmalade is wonderful on corn muffins.
___

I really love mango chutney. And my all time favorite way of eating it?....Over corn chips of course (the salty little ones not tortilla chips although that is good too). DH and I have gone through canner loads of mango chutney in this fashion. Not very fancy but oh so good.
__

The classic Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwich takes on a whole new dimension with chutney replacing the jelly, on whole wheat toast. Which I'll have for lunch, I think, using some cherry and chipotle (smoked jalapeño) chutney.
__

Use fruit chutneys in chicken salad. Simply cut the mayonnaise in half, and fill with an equal part of chutney to add flavor and interest to your salad! You'll also be reducing the fat!

Use chutneys as a delicious sandwich spread

Serve with hard, sharp cheeses for a sophisticated & delicious hors d'oeuvre

Serve as an accompaniment to pork tenderloin
__

Not really a sauce or a dip, Chutney is in a class of its own. It's most frequently made with fruits, tomatoes, vinegar, sugar, honey and spices and its constitution can be thick or thin. Originally from India, it is often referred to as a relish and can be sweet, savory, or even spicy. The English word chutney derives from the Hindi word "chatni," which can be translated as a verb for "licking." Chutney has been used for hundreds of years throughout Asia and Europe and in the United States it is most notably an addition to many dishes in Southern Cuisine.

More substantive than a condiment and more flexible than a spread - chutney is a great pairing for a plethora of foods - including meats, fish, vegetables, cakes, cheeses and sandwiches. If you are looking for a great way to jazz up your summer dishes, grab some chutney. You can find it in most grocery stores. For more flavors and variety try your local farmer's markets or online. Soon you'll find it is a great addition to nearly every meal.

Here are multiple ways to add chutney to your festive food celebrations this summer:

Fancy Friday Night Dinner: Marinate sweet corn on the cob in a sauté of melted butter and chopped garlic. Grill for 15 minutes, turning after every 5 min, then slice the corn off the cob. Season with salt and pepper. Serve as a side dish sprinkled with chopped parsley and a scoop of mango chutney and a dollop of sour cream on top. Pair it with steak and a light white wine like Vernaccia.

Saturday Morning Breakfast: Prepare whole wheat pancakes with a side of sausage. Serve apple chutney as a dipping sauce on the side. Pair with fresh apple cider over ice.

Simple Saturday Afternoon Snack: Spread a plate with water crackers, sliced Gouda cheese and peach chutney. Pair it with iced lemonade.

Saturday Night Casual BBQ Dinner: Prepare grilled chicken breasts and/or a meaty fish like salmon or sea bass on the grill. Wrap russet potatoes in aluminium foil and place on grill as well for at least 50 minutes. Toss chopped red leaf lettuce, kirby cucumbers and grape tomatoes in a 1/4 cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice, 1 tsp salt, 1 tsp pepper and dress it with olive oil. Serve plum chutney as a condiment for the potatoes and/or a spread for the meat or fish.

Sunday brunch: Prepare eggs over easy, layer them over a square piece of cornbread, topped them with chutney and crème fraiche!
__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2011, 06:46 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
Posts: 233
Wow, that is all the info I could possibly need to know. Thanks for that!
mkaylady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2011, 07:06 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,651
I like sweet mango chutney with old cheddar on crackers.....sometimes I will dice up a hot pepper and sprinkle some on....
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2011, 07:10 PM   #20
Cook
 
sarahmom22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 80
Mmm I like Mango Chutney with Naan when I'm having Indian food :)
__________________
Can't handle the heat? Then get out of my kitchen!
sarahmom22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.