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Old 10-12-2007, 07:23 PM   #1
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Worcestershire sauce?

I suppose I could Google this, but then again, I’m not guaranteed to get TNT uses. Besides, DC benefits from shared knowledge.

So, what exactly is Worcestershire sauce for? I know it’s great as an additive to many things, but as a stand alone sauce, why was this stuff created? Was it meant to be a steak sauce or what?

Also, what do YOU use it for?

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Old 10-12-2007, 07:26 PM   #2
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I add Worcestershire sauce to soups, stews and sauces. I don't remember the last time I used it, if ever, by itself as a standalone sauce on meat or another dish.

I love the flavor it adds to these dishes.
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Old 10-12-2007, 07:32 PM   #3
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Yeah, that pesky hard-to-use Google. . . .


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
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Old 10-12-2007, 07:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Yeah, that pesky hard-to-use Google. . . .


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
Actually, I already read that before I posted this. I did Google it a bit, but didn't see anything other than it's an additive, and Wiki would have you believe it's primary function in life is for a Caesar salad . Is that really all it is. There has to be more.

Does no one use it for anything besides a Caesar salad? I’ve used it as an additive in marinades, especially for jerky. But is that all it was meant for? Just a seasoning kind of like Dale’s?

Perhaps it was never special or can’t be special like A1 or soy, maybe it is just an ingredient like salt.

Buuuuuuuttttttt………that wiki article still didn’t have a listing on how the users at DC work with it.
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:00 PM   #5
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I use it when i cook ground beef, no matter WHAT the recipe. It just goes hand in hand with ground beef. I love it with stroganoff too. Mixed with Ketchup and Malt Vinegar it makes an AMAZING dipping sauce for fries and what not. Of course for burgers it's a granted. It's a pretty unique product, i can't imagine having a kitchen without it.
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:35 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig View Post
I use it when i cook ground beef, no matter WHAT the recipe. It just goes hand in hand with ground beef. I love it with stroganoff too. Mixed with Ketchup and Malt Vinegar it makes an AMAZING dipping sauce for fries and what not. Of course for burgers it's a granted. It's a pretty unique product, i can't imagine having a kitchen without it.

Really? What do you do to make it a dipping sauce.....plain or do you add something to it. I'll have to try this!
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Old 10-12-2007, 08:52 PM   #7
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I use it in cooking almost every kind of meat. It's wonderful for roasts in the slow cooker. I generally put at least a little in most every marinade I make. I've never thought to use it as a dipping sauce but I'm absolutely going try try your suggestion, Mylegsbig. I love malt vinegar and I'm sure it will be excellent with Worcestershire. Thanks!
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:43 PM   #8
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L&P sauce was a accident a pharmacist in London made a batch and tasted it and it was horrible. He left it in a barrel for two years and found it again and tasted it and found it wonderful. that is the history in a nut shell.. I use it in almost every thing I cook
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:47 PM   #9
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Not quite on point, but do you refrigerate Worcestershire sauce after opening? I don't because I use it quite quickly. I buy it by the gallon.
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:52 PM   #10
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Been cooking for almost 50 years (whoa, that's scary - the 50 years part) and have never refrigerated Worcestershire sauce.
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Old 10-12-2007, 11:13 PM   #11
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The first thing my family used it for was as a steak sauce. I like to add it to a lot of dishes, especially things that are cooked with tomatoes and beef. I've never refrigerated it either.

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Old 10-12-2007, 11:19 PM   #12
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According to the L&P Bottle I have, Refrigeration is not necessary after opening. I read it twice to make sure...

I love this stuff though. It's a MUST in home made Chex Mix.. Jerky too...
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Old 10-12-2007, 11:45 PM   #13
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worcestershire sauce has a ton of salt in it, so i've is used as a salty flavoring component in things like burgers, meatloafs, soups, casseroles, salsas, sauces, roasts, potatoes, and steamed veggies, and drinks such as bloody marys.

my wife doesn't like it much, so i've found it to be a tricky thing to use as it's flavor seems to stand out in just about every dish. it's very distinct, so just a little goes a long way.

i, however, could drink the stuff straight. as a kid, my dad and i would head into the veggie garden with a bottle of worcestershire, splash a little on each of the freshly picked vegetables, and devour them.

i didn't know that butter and a little salt was good on steamed veggies until i was an adult, as i was hooked on the sauce. my favourite is on steamed baby peas. next would be boiled baby redskins.

keltin, do yourself a favor and get some garden ripe tomatoes, slice them into wedges, and splash on a good amount of worcestershire and let sit for a few minutes. then pig out. if you like bloody marys, you'll love it on fresh tomatoes. so much that you'll invariably end up sucking down the leftover mix of worcestershire sauce and tomato juice/mucillageny from the plate.

with no one looking of course.
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Old 10-13-2007, 12:03 AM   #14
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keltin, do yourself a favor and get some garden ripe tomatoes, slice them into wedges, and splash on a good amount of worcestershire and let sit for a few minutes. then pig out.
I will definitely try this on fresh tomatoes. I don't know why I hadn't thought of this before. Thanks BT!

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Old 10-13-2007, 12:07 AM   #15
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I use Worcestershire sauce on frozen french fries in the oven along with garlic, paprika and butter. The Worcestershire sauce adds a great flavor.
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Old 10-13-2007, 12:09 AM   #16
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In the UK, the predecessor to Worcestershire sauce, Henderson Relish, is the "no meat pie" is complete with out kinda thing.

Like Worcestershire sauce, it is tangy, thin, dark, and mysterious. BUT, it is on the table at ALL pubs, and food halls. Like ketchup here, it is a very common condiment. I LOVE my cow pie just less then smothered with the stuff!

In the US it seems to just be what you said, an additive, but next time you have meat loaf, give it a shot like a regular 'ol condiment...or heck, even on french fries.

Just my $.02
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Old 10-13-2007, 12:40 AM   #17
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No steak sauce on hand? Mix worcestershire and ketchup and your set according to my kids..They love it.
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Old 10-13-2007, 01:11 AM   #18
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barbara, et al,

try it on steamed or reheated canned veggies, like baby peas or corn. you'll love it.

still, there's something about tomatoes and worcestershire that matches perfectly.
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Old 10-13-2007, 02:55 AM   #19
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Bucky, I do the same thing myself. On garden fresh tomatoes, nothing better. Oh yeah, I often toss on some shaved Parmesan or other cheese. Too bad the garden fresh guys are getting to the end of the season.

There are only two of us here but we go through a lot of the W stuff.

When I get into one of my peanut butter jags I will always add W sauce to it.

Or add a bit to a melted cheese sandwich.

My reflexive answer to 'Does this need anything?' is W sauce.

I know of few soups, any kind of stew like dish, or even some salads that cannot taste better with a splash. Ya just gotta keep it below the taste radar for guests.

As for me, splash it on. I love the stuff.

Oh yeah, and a tip of the bottle in a bloody Mary will take the drink over the top.
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Old 10-13-2007, 02:58 AM   #20
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it`s for cheese on toast (cheese toasties) and don`t let anyone try and convince you otherwise ;)
it does go nice on Chicken and Mushroom pie too.
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