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Old 08-12-2020, 11:00 AM   #41
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Sorry Andy - didn't see your post.

That's extremely unusual taxy - bet it wasn't a very popular stove! Even after a burner is lit - a flame can be blown out.
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Old 08-12-2020, 11:15 AM   #42
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Sorry Andy - didn't see your post.

That's extremely unusual taxy - bet it wasn't a very popular stove! Even after a burner is lit - a flame can be blown out.
That's why the dials on Danish gas stoves are a little different from the ones over here. There, you turn the dial past max to the part where the flame gets smaller and there is a stopper, so you won't make the flame so small that it will be easily blown out by a gust of air.

I have no idea about the popularity of that stove that didn't work with the power out. It was probably 20 years ago. My friend wasn't too pleased with that safety feature and figured they could have just made you push a button while lighting the burner with a match.
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Old 08-12-2020, 12:31 PM   #43
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That's why the dials on Danish gas stoves are a little different from the ones over here. There, you turn the dial past max to the part where the flame gets smaller and there is a stopper, so you won't make the flame so small that it will be easily blown out by a gust of air.

I have no idea about the popularity of that stove that didn't work with the power out. It was probably 20 years ago. My friend wasn't too pleased with that safety feature and figured they could have just made you push a button while lighting the burner with a match.
I believe my last, or second to last, stove was like that. It is not unusual. But it's not necessarily just a small flame that can be blown out. "done that, been there"

but now I've reread your statement. I believe you have it a bit backwards, you turn the dial all the way from min. to max. in order to light, then you turn it down to where you want. Mine right now is the start for the clicker on max. To turn it off you have to come back thru max. The other ones you just went below min. and it shut off.

Anyhow, there are probably a gazillion ways to work them. The Aga ones are never even turned off! I've been using gas stoves for more than 50 years and my two top choices if $$ were no problem would be Wolf and Aga. In my dreams, sigh...
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Old 08-12-2020, 12:47 PM   #44
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Not sure what kind of electronic controls there are for stove top burners. If you turn a knob to light them, you should be OK. The automatic sparking won't work but you can light them with a match.
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You can light your burners with a match. Flame control is a rotary dial, not electronic. Just the spark would not work.

Oven is a different matter. You need to have the temperature sensor working, otherwise it would just get hotter and hotter.
I have no idea whether this is a feature on a propane stove, but my gas range has a sensor on a burner with a very low flame setting (melt) that relights the burner if the flame goes out.
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Old 08-12-2020, 12:50 PM   #45
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My Mom's last one (I think it was installed in '92) was that type where it started at max when you first turned it on, and had to turn back through the max, to turn off. Mine has pilot lights - it's a Wolf I got in '83, and that thing will outlive me, and probably the next owner of the house! I don't realize how much I take for granted those high heat burners, until I cook somewhere else.
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Old 08-12-2020, 01:55 PM   #46
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Quote:
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I believe my last, or second to last, stove was like that. It is not unusual. But it's not necessarily just a small flame that can be blown out. "done that, been there"

but now I've reread your statement. I believe you have it a bit backwards, you turn the dial all the way from min. to max. in order to light, then you turn it down to where you want. Mine right now is the start for the clicker on max. To turn it off you have to come back thru max. The other ones you just went below min. and it shut off.

Anyhow, there are probably a gazillion ways to work them. The Aga ones are never even turned off! I've been using gas stoves for more than 50 years and my two top choices if $$ were no problem would be Wolf and Aga. In my dreams, sigh...
Maybe my description was a bit backwards, but what you described is what I meant. I never saw them here, but I haven't had a gas stove since 1989. I got used to the Danish ones in 1969.
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Old 08-12-2020, 03:44 PM   #47
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I have a thermadore range and the 2 front burners can be hand lit if power goes off - I have no idea about the oven however. The back burners cannot be lit this way as they have some sort of auto ignition to maintain the low, low simmer settings (they start and stop and start by themselves).

Twice in the past few years we've had power outages that lasted a couple of days - I was glad to have the stove top.
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Old 08-12-2020, 05:55 PM   #48
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Why don't you just buy an electric range with coil burners?
+1 Agree
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Old 08-13-2020, 09:34 AM   #49
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+1 Agree
I take it you did not read my detailed response to this question?

One more thing I see now a days is "reviews". You can get your heart set on a certain appliance and get excellent reports about it.
But on the next page here comes a negative review.

I have always had the highest respect and trusted "Consumer Reports".
There are plenty free reviews but CR is a paid reporting agency.
Since the range I am looking very hard at is a "recommended" range by CR, I tend to believe them more than others.
Lets see if my observation plays out here.

https://www.costco.com/lg-6.9cuft-ga...100228649.html

Great price as well.
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Old 08-13-2020, 10:47 AM   #50
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Here's a link to a very nifty, free, webservice: Fakespot. Just paste the URL of the site or page with the reviews and it to this site and it will analyze the reviews, looking for reviews by bots. It will give you an idea of how authentic the reviews are. Not, the individual reviews, but in general.
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Old 08-13-2020, 10:55 AM   #51
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I take it you did not read my detailed response to this question?

One more thing I see now a days is "reviews". You can get your heart set on a certain appliance and get excellent reports about it.
But on the next page here comes a negative review.

I have always had the highest respect and trusted "Consumer Reports".
There are plenty free reviews but CR is a paid reporting agency.
Since the range I am looking very hard at is a "recommended" range by CR, I tend to believe them more than others.
Lets see if my observation plays out here.

https://www.costco.com/lg-6.9cuft-ga...100228649.html

Great price as well.
I noticed this range does not have a self-cleaning feature. That is, high temps to burn off dirt. They advertise and 10-minute process. Seems difficult to believe - spray some water and 10 minutes later your oven is clean.
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Old 08-13-2020, 01:24 PM   #52
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My range also is not self cleaning and while I miss this, High temps from the clean cycle were responsible for melting control boards on previous jenn-airs so I passed.

I also use the spray and wipe method and don't think it's much worse then wiping out the ash residue after a clean cycle. I still have to stick me head in the oven and abuse my knees. Grime seems to come loose pretty well.
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Old 08-13-2020, 03:21 PM   #53
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Iíve had a basic GE Profile gas stove for 20 years. I use the self cleaning feature as needed. Never had a problem.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:04 AM   #54
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I noticed this range does not have a self-cleaning feature. That is, high temps to burn off dirt. They advertise and 10-minute process. Seems difficult to believe - spray some water and 10 minutes later your oven is clean.
It does say self clean in the description. You have to click "More" to see all the description.
Also most all the new gas and electric are now using a steam clean function in addition to the high heat function.
You add water to a reservoir in the bottom of the oven. You don't spray water into it. Thats all I know.

Self clean even though it is listed as self clean is not a deal breaker.
I have maybe used self clean in my electric maybe 4 times over 25 years.
I have not pulled the trigger as I am not sure about the double oven yet.
Thanks for taking a look Andy.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:24 AM   #55
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The double oven could be OK as long as you don't try to cook a huge turkey in it.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:29 AM   #56
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I have maybe used self clean in my electric maybe 4 times over 25 years.
I have not pulled the trigger as I am not sure about the double oven yet.
Thanks for taking a look Andy.
Rare for me to use the self clean in any of my ovens.

What's to puzzle over a double oven? I'd LOVE to have two ovens.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:47 AM   #57
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Rare for me to use the self clean in any of my ovens.

What's to puzzle over a double oven? I'd LOVE to have two ovens.
The only real issue with a double oven is whether it's big enough to fit a large item. A big Thanksgiving turkey is the usual example.
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Old 08-14-2020, 10:56 AM   #58
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The only real issue with a double oven is whether it's big enough to fit a large item. A big Thanksgiving turkey is the usual example.
Also, the bottom oven is quite low and requires extra bending to use.
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Old 08-14-2020, 11:04 AM   #59
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The only real issue with a double oven is whether it's big enough to fit a large item. A big Thanksgiving turkey is the usual example.
My in-laws' double oven is big enough to fit a turkey, but not a very large one. I've made a 15-lb turkey in it. I've also broiled turkey parts in the smaller oven and sides in the larger oven. It just depends on how you want to do things.

Taxy is also right that it's more difficult to put heavy things in and take them out because it's so low. .
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Old 08-14-2020, 12:06 PM   #60
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Got it. Forgot that those in my family who do have 2 ovens are usually a wall oven and one in the stove.

While we're at it. Used to be able to get wall ovens with doors that opend to the side. They were perfect.

Ever watch Lydia B. putting a casserole into her wall oven? Wonder how many burns she suffered to her chest.

Can't see the difference in difficulty of bending with a heavy object and if being heavy enough you have to almost straddle that door. Or lifting in or out a heavy object over a door that is at chest height.

Doesn\t make sense.
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