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Old 03-14-2012, 09:41 PM   #1
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African/Ethiopian Cookbook

Since moving out of NYC I have been missing my local African, particularly Ethiopian restaurants. Any suggestions on a cookbook specializing in African cuisine (Not North African - that I know how to cook)?
I look at the Marcus Samuelson cookbook - that is not really what I am looking for. I want more like injera with a multitude of toppings.

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Old 03-14-2012, 11:01 PM   #2
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That is one cuisine that has not been made commonplace in California. There are a few places that I know of but I have not gone yet. That bread/pancake thing looks difficult at home. Is It?
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Old 03-14-2012, 11:33 PM   #3
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there is an ethiopian restaurant a few blocks away from my building. i've never thought to go there since i can't seem to get past the idea of the publicised accounts of ethiopians starving in the desert. it's a mental picture that doesn't conjure up thoughts of dinner.

yes, i know that's ignorant.

i'll have to try ethiopian one night. i'll wear a loincloth...



yes, wrong again.
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Old 03-14-2012, 11:49 PM   #4
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Love Ethiopian food.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:21 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4meandthem
That is one cuisine that has not been made commonplace in California. There are a few places that I know of but I have not gone yet. That bread/pancake thing looks difficult at home. Is It?
Never tried to make it but from my understanding it's much like a sourdough crepe
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:09 AM   #6
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Generally, I'm thinking you need a population from the culture. Then someone from the culture will open a place. The rest of us will "discover" the place and it goes from there.
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:56 AM   #7
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There is a large Ethiopian community in Ottawa. Subsequently, a few places close by. I would go, but I am not too familiar with the dishes so, I would be a bit intimidated as to what to order.
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:46 AM   #8
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I bought a copy of this years ago. It became so well-worn and covered in food stains that I'm now on my second copy:

Amazon.com: The Africa News Cookbook: African Cooking for Western Kitchens (Penguin Handbooks) (9780140467512): Africa News Service Inc., Tami Hultman: Books

Good stuff.
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:49 AM   #9
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We have a small Ethiopian community right smack in the middle of a large Jewish community and there are several Ethiopian restaurants along this one block stretch. I like their food.
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Old 03-15-2012, 02:09 PM   #10
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I had Ethiopian cuisine many years ago, in the 1990s on Manhattan´s Upper Westside near the Museum of Natural History ( Colombus and West 79th ). I had no idea if it is still there.

I do recall it was lovely. Lots of subtle spices and the fish was stunning and it was served with a long grain rice.

Would enjoy to try again --- here I go for Moroccan, Tunisian, Turkish, Greek, Mexican and Japanese --- however, I believe there are some French Senegalese restaurants that had lovely write ups in the El Mundo and El Pais newspaper.

Margi.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:32 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
We have a small Ethiopian community right smack in the middle of a large Jewish community and there are several Ethiopian restaurants along this one block stretch. I like their food.
Been there, roadfix, I like its restaurants, clothing and coffee shops too. Lived there for a while. I don't remember the cookbook's title, but the only one I've seen or purchased, in English, covered the entire continent, and it was a gift for a good childhood friend who was the Assistant to Kenya's Ambassador to Japan.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:36 PM   #12
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I used to go to an Ethiopian restaurant in Ottawa...it was on Wellington and...Bronson. Another in the Byward Market. I only make a couple of Ethiopian dishes...now that you've reminded me, I'll have to dig out those recipes!
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:07 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I bought a copy of this years ago. It became so well-worn and covered in food stains that I'm now on my second copy:

Amazon.com: The Africa News Cookbook: African Cooking for Western Kitchens (Penguin Handbooks) (9780140467512): Africa News Service Inc., Tami Hultman: Books

Good stuff.
its out of print
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:12 PM   #14
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its out of print
Yep, but it's still widely available. If you take the time to click the "available from these sellers" link on Amazon, you can buy it used for anywhere from $5 to $200, depending on the condition.

A little Googling turned up a gently used copy on eBay for 10 bucks...

The Africa News Cookbook, African Cooking for Western Kitchens, 1995, African (9780140467512) | eBay
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:04 AM   #15
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Try these:

Ethiopian Recipes and the Cooking of Ethiopia | Whats4Eats
Sauce Recipes - The Congo Cookbook (African recipes) www.congocookbook.com -
Ethiopia: Menus & Recipes from Africa
Injera (Ethiopian flatbread) Recipe | MyRecipes.com

Ethiopian food that I've had strongly reminds me of Indian food. It seems to use most of the same spices and many of the same staples, with some important differences, such as the teff-based injera as opposed to the wheat-based chappati.

Mesir Wat is really good, and the Ethiopian version of ghee (niter kibbeh) is very good. I usually use unpressed panir for iab - when I make it here it's based on cow's milk, in India, Panir is made from water buffalo milk, and my guess is that iab is made from goat milk in Ethiopia.
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:03 AM   #16
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Hmm, can't edit my post!

A slight correction - injera is more like a dosa actually than a chappati - both are fermented, the injera is based on Teff and the dosa is based on ground urad dal and ground rice.
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