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Old 08-05-2017, 09:33 AM   #1
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Please help me decode this 1800s recipe!

I've been on a kick lately reading some old cookbooks, many of which have hand written recipes on the blank pages. I found this recipe interesting but can't figure out some of the measurements....brown sugar looks like "do"...
Anyone have any ideas?

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Old 08-05-2017, 09:39 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Rparrny View Post
I've been on a kick lately reading some old cookbooks, many of which have hand written recipes on the blank pages. I found this recipe interesting but can't figure out some of the measurements....brown sugar looks like "do"...
Anyone have any ideas?
I can't read it. Can you post a higher-resolution image? Maybe as a PDF?
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Old 08-05-2017, 10:38 AM   #3
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Here's what I've been able to discern as far as ingredients are concerned:

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
1 pint bowl grated bread crumbs
1 cup suet, chopped
1 do brown sugar
˝ do molasses ?
˝ do sour milk
2 teaspoons ? ?
˝ teacup brandy
1 teaspoon each ? ? ? lemon extract
4 eggs beat ?
1 large cup raisins
1 do do currants
1 small piece citron, cut fine


Not sure what the "do" measurement signifies but it appears a number of times.


Maybe you could search the Internet for an early plum pudding recipe and come up with an adequate match.
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Old 08-05-2017, 10:42 AM   #4
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Here's one from 1912 that might give you some clue about the other ingredients, along with the method of preparation.
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Old 08-05-2017, 11:32 AM   #5
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I googled "what does do mean in 1800s recipes" and came up with several sources that indicate it is an abbreviation for ditto. That would seem to fit in this recipe, especially given the double dos under raisins for currants.
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Old 08-05-2017, 12:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
Here's what I've been able to discern as far as ingredients are concerned:

CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING
1 pint bowl grated bread crumbs
1 cup suet, chopped
1 do brown sugar
˝ do molasses ?
˝ do sour milk
2 teaspoons ? ?
˝ teacup brandy
1 teaspoon each ? ? ? lemon extract
4 eggs beat ?
1 large cup raisins
1 do do currants
1 small piece citron, cut fine


Not sure what the "do" measurement signifies but it appears a number of times.


Maybe you could search the Internet for an early plum pudding recipe and come up with an adequate match.
I'd guess that do refers to what we now call a dollop.which in itself is indefinite. Somewhere in between a Tps and a Tbs.

Lest we forget, grandma didn't have access to an electronic scale or in many cases even measuring spoons and cups.
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Old 08-05-2017, 12:26 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I googled "what does do mean in 1800s recipes" and came up with several sources that indicate it is an abbreviation for ditto. That would seem to fit in this recipe, especially given the double dos under raisins for currants.

Ditto makes sense. You can't "dollop" milk or other liquids ...
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Old 08-05-2017, 02:40 PM   #8
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IF "ditto" is correct, that's the weirdest thing I've heard in a long time.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:04 PM   #9
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1 do do currants
I wouldn't eat anything that calls for do do
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:28 PM   #10
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I wouldn't eat anything that calls for do do
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IF "ditto" is correct, that's the weirdest thing I've heard in a long time.
You know language changes over time and we're talking over 100 years here. Things don't mean the same now as then, and there are a whole lot of words in use now that weren't in use then (and vice versa).
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:32 PM   #11
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I don't really think "ditto" applies. For example, look at the measurements for molasses and sour milk.

If I could see a larger, clearer image of the recipe it would be easier to decipher what the originator had in mind.

My curiosity is definitely piqued.
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:34 PM   #12
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I wouldn't eat anything that calls for do do
You couldn't make the recipe. Dodos are extinct!
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Old 08-05-2017, 03:40 PM   #13
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I think "do" is actually "c/o" - "cup of" as for the double dodo...can't say it's a typo
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Old 08-05-2017, 04:51 PM   #14
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I think ditto does fit. Not sure what Katie means because i found recipes that called for 1/2 cup, as well as a cup of molasses, though generally didn't call for brown sugar with a cup. As for milk, a lot of recipes do call for more, but they don't call for brandy, so that's a wash. And, do do, meaning ditto ditto is the only thing that makes sense for a "large cup."
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Old 08-05-2017, 04:54 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rparrny View Post
I've been on a kick lately reading some old cookbooks, many of which have hand written recipes on the blank pages. I found this recipe interesting but can't figure out some of the measurements....brown sugar looks like "do"...
Anyone have any ideas?
I just realized something from reading 1 of your other posts. Are you planning on making this? Cause it's not kosher with suet in it.
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:54 PM   #16
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so is the general opinion that ditto here means Cup?
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:02 PM   #17
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so is the general opinion that ditto here means Cup?
Ditto means whatever is above it, whether that be a cup, a teaspoon, tablespoon, large, small, etc.
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:45 PM   #18
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so is the general opinion that ditto here means Cup?
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Ditto means whatever is above it, whether that be a cup, a teaspoon, tablespoon, large, small, etc.
Is it certain the "do" means ditto?
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Old 08-06-2017, 03:50 PM   #19
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To me, it's the only thing that does given the sources I found, as well as the recipe itself. But, in the post you quoted, I was only explaining the meaning/use of "ditto."
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:24 PM   #20
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Here is a possible lead on some answers.

I am a fan of Townsends 18th century cooking YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/user/jastownsendandson

They do a Q&A episode on a regular basis. There may also be a another way to get an answer from them?

CD
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