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Old 07-03-2017, 05:19 PM   #21
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I was just looking at Caliphalon pans on amazon, and all were non-stick with what ?

But they also had a stainless steel multi layer and a cast iron. So I did not see one that was just bare anaodized surface.

That would be the best thing, then smolder on the oil , not too high tech stuff that can come off.




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My hard anodized Calphalon pan had no coating. The anodizing process made for a very smooth and slick surface all over and that surface was harder than steel. Good stuff.
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Old 07-03-2017, 10:48 PM   #22
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Calphalon has a good explanation of their various cookware: the composition of the inside and outside of the item, whether or not it is dishwasher safe, etc. You can find it at this link: Cookware Comparison It appears that the outside of the cookware has been anodized, while the inside is treated with a safer version of "Teflon".

If you want more in-depth reading about the anodizing process, have at it here: What is Anodizing?
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Old 07-04-2017, 04:59 AM   #23
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Here's ATK's review of carbon steel skillets and seasoning instructions:



I'm tempted to get one, although I don't really need another skillet. I used Calphalon anodized (not non-stick) for years, and picked up an All Clad SS a year ago (during one of their regular factory seconds sale). The Calphalon has been retired. The All Clad is much less prone to sticking than the Calphalon. By the way, no durability issues with the Calphalon, and have used metal utensils for years.
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Old 07-04-2017, 01:40 PM   #24
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Question

The calphalon site was indicating that the anodizing was on the out side only. and the Matfer Bourgeat pans on amazon were suffering from warping! I need a really thick carbon steel pan.

That is an excellent video, but will it work for injera? She was sayin gthat wet food like sauces will not work. well I did get my old crepep pan to work with many layers of oil, except fot a small spot that must have gotten too hot.

Some time ago at the goodwill, I found an 11 inch diameter Kirkland professional flat bottom aluminum stir-fry pan, with dimples (like a golf ball) in the bottom inside. I thought it was a nonstick surface inside that just did not work any longer. It maybe anodized only on the outside, but who knows.

Could it be at a dangerous state of disintegration? Or is it just not made with a “nonstick” coating. How can I determine if it has Teflon or not?

I may need to dissolve some carbon in the dimples with oven cleaner. If it does have a nonstick coating inside will it also dissolve? If so, good; I don't want it.

After reading how the old Teflon pans were dissolving into food, I don't trust any of it. I may already have cancer from my old carbon steel wok loosing PFOA into food.

I want to be able to through the pan across the room with out damage to the pan. Are any of the aluminum pans likely to be able to hold up to that? Not that I would do it very often. Only when it starts sticking again. I think my best bet is to find that new high tech nonstick spray, that would be impossibly expensive.


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The Calphalon has been retired. The All Clad is much less prone to sticking than the Calphalon. By the way, no durability issues with the Calphalon, and have used metal utensils for years.
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Old 07-04-2017, 02:14 PM   #25
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Question Thick carbon steel pans?

it looks like I want a Mauviel pan only $40 for a 9.5 inch...then I can through out all the cheap pans I have collected.

Any better ideas on thick carbon steel pans?

I was just reading this review, what do you think could be the problem ???:

"I originally thought this pan while not non stick would come around after repeated seasonings just like my many cast iron pans. After a year of use, I am very disappointed. I have seasoned and re-seasoned this pan using every different method possible. I can not use this pan for eggs without knowing I will be scrubbing for a while to get it clean. Does not matter how much fat I put in the pan. Very disappointed."
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Old 07-04-2017, 05:31 PM   #26
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Looks like the french pan is close to impossible to get off all the bee's wax. Why can't they just season the pan the right way to keep it from rusting from the factory. But the lodge pan are no smaller than 11”.

Now I am trying to find details about seasoning. It looks like flax seed and ard are the lowest smoking temp oils. so does that mean they adhear better? Or does it just means that they wont burn so badly because of the user will stop when the smoke starts to get bad. very interesting.
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:27 PM   #27
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ANY oil with a reasonably high smoke point will do. I don't see one being better than the other. Corn, peanut, canola, flaxseed, etc. Crisco will also work. Use whichever is cheapest that you have on hand.
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:46 PM   #28
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Just remember that aluminium pans won't work on induction burners.
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Old 07-04-2017, 09:42 PM   #29
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Quote:
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Looks like the french pan is close to impossible to get off all the bee's wax. Why can't they just season the pan the right way to keep it from rusting from the factory.
Regarding the beeswax on the "French pan," there nothing difficult at all about removing it. Hot water, soap, and a scrubber pretty much does the trick.

Quote:
Now I am trying to find details about seasoning. It looks like flax seed and ard are the lowest smoking temp oils. so does that mean they adhear better? Or does it just means that they wont burn so badly because of the user will stop when the smoke starts to get bad. very interesting.
Jawnn, based on what I've read in this thread, I'm not sure you really understand the process of seasoning. I've linked a video below that might help explain it better:
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Old 07-05-2017, 04:44 PM   #30
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Wink thanks

oh ya that is the one I was about to post. so ther is one more. But at least I did learrn a lot from this good discussion. thanks.

I also found some good info about how the oil makes a carbon matrix.

Only one last question?: obviusly I can't cook with wine or vinegar in the carbon steel pans, unless I can just splash some in and let it evaporate before it ruins the seasoning.

If I want to cook with liquid I think I need a stainless steel pan, or an aluminum anodized pan with out the so called high tech non stick stuff.

What do you use? Or is that just not a good way to cook.
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Old 07-05-2017, 05:02 PM   #31
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Lightbulb

this is the only carbon steel crepe pan with low rim, that I could find

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Old 07-05-2017, 09:55 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
oh ya that is the one I was about to post. so ther is one more. But at least I did learrn a lot from this good discussion. thanks.

I also found some good info about how the oil makes a carbon matrix.

Only one last question?: obviusly I can't cook with wine or vinegar in the carbon steel pans, unless I can just splash some in and let it evaporate before it ruins the seasoning.

If I want to cook with liquid I think I need a stainless steel pan, or an aluminum anodized pan with out the so called high tech non stick stuff.

What do you use? Or is that just not a good way to cook.
All of my pans are either stainless, or aluminum with nonstick, or enameled cast iron. While there are good reasons for using cast iron and carbon steel, I haven't found them to be sufficient motivation to change up what I do. I have a 10" and a 12" try ply stainless (one Kitchen Aid and one All Clad), 8", 12" and 14" nonstick aluminum (Chef's and Bakers brand), and 2 enameled cast iron dutch ovens. I also have 1 stainless and 2 nonstick anodized aluminum sauce pans.

These just happen to be what works for me. I still think that a good cook can work with most anything of reasonable quality. And no, I don't see myself as all that good. I'm just acceptable, but working hard toward becoming average.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:50 AM   #33
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I don't like aluminum pans, the coatings come off quickly, then the pan is NOT non reactive with acidic foods, not good. I don't want aluminum in my food. I'd go cast iron, it is reactive too but, Iron is a nutrient, aluminum isn't.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:04 PM   #34
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Question cooking wet?

which ones do you cook wet food in?

I need something for soy sauce vinigar and wine. so I tak it that the anodized aluminum is not a good chioce for that?
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:10 PM   #35
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For that. I'd go stainless steel or glass, or ceramic non stick, like Copper Chef or Red Copper. Vinegar is 5% acidity, so you definitely want a non reactive pan for that combined with wine.

Cream sauces and gravies, I use cast iron but, vinegar, fruit, tomatoes, wine, stainless for stovetop and glass for oven. Copper Chef for my camping cookware since it is very easy to wipe clean and, non reactive. (Or any other brand of ceramic non stick, I just happen to have Copper Chef brand.)
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:50 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
which ones do you cook wet food in?

I need something for soy sauce vinigar and wine. so I tak it that the anodized aluminum is not a good chioce for that?
Anodized alum. will be OK with acidic liquids. Cast iron is not recommended. Stainless steel is probably the best all-around choice as it's completely non-reactive with all foods and there isn't a surface that can wear off.
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Old 07-06-2017, 05:06 PM   #37
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ok I just ordered a Anolon Nouvelle Copper bottom pan for only $32 it maybe coming from china because it was about $20 less than other places. unless it is counterfeit?

thanks for all the info
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Old 07-06-2017, 06:30 PM   #38
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Even if it is a counterfeit, if it works as well as the real deal, it really doesn't matter.
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:57 PM   #39
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Lightbulb Still confused./ maybe not.

I am still confused about which oils to use on my carbon steel pans. I am sure that flax seed oil is the best and most expinsive. But the things I have read about what makes it work is the omega 3 fatty acids and/or the lignins, all combining to make a carbon matrix ......

But the smoking point is not high, infact it is the lowest of the oils on the list I found. So I am going to ignor the smoking point of the oils.
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Old 07-07-2017, 04:45 PM   #40
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Peanut oil is what I have always used on carbon steel. You don't want to ignore the smoke point of an oil, burnt oil contains carcinogens and, you don't want that in your food.
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