"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cook's Tools
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-07-2017, 04:54 PM   #41
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,729
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
I am still confused about which oils to use on my carbon steel pans. I am sure that flax seed oil is the best and most expinsive. But the things I have read about what makes it work is the omega 3 fatty acids and/or the lignins, all combining to make a carbon matrix ......

But the smoking point is not high, infact it is the lowest of the oils on the list I found. So I am going to ignor the smoking point of the oils.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
Flax seed oil is good. It's what I use, particularly on display items, and the method you read works well. But it is not the only workable oil. Others such as vegetable oils, Crisco, also work well. The key is an oil that polymerizes easily...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
...I use canola oil to season my cast iron.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
...By the way, walnut oil, toasted sesame oil, or olive oil shouldn't be used for seasoning a pan. They contain a lot of dissolved solids, and are better used as flavoring or finishing oils than for cooking. For seasoning a pan, flaxseed oil works well (my favorite), but you can also use lard, crisco, or coconut oil.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
ANY oil with a reasonably high smoke point will do. I don't see one being better than the other. Corn, peanut, canola, flaxseed, etc. Crisco will also work. Use whichever is cheapest that you have on hand.
You should not be confused. Any high smoke point oil will produce the same results. A polymerized coating will form on the pan and protect the metal surface giving you a good surface to cook on.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2017, 04:54 PM   #42
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
I had not though of that.....but the lectures on the videos say bring it up to the smoke point then cool down. I assume so that it is not burning too much, just starting to polymerize?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueMoods View Post
Peanut oil is what I have always used on carbon steel. You don't want to ignore the smoke point of an oil, burnt oil contains carcinogens and, you don't want that in your food.
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2017, 05:02 PM   #43
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
but what do you mean by high smoke point?

Avocado Oil
570F
271C

Butter
250-200F
120-150C

Canola Oil (refined)
400F
204C

Coconut Oil (extra virgin)
350F
177C

Coconut Oil (refined)
450F
232C

Corn Oil
440F
227C

Flax seed Oil
225F
107C

Ghee*(clarified Butter'0
485F
252C




Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Any high smoke point oil will produce the same results.
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2017, 05:05 PM   #44
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,729
Any oil with at least a 400F smoke point should do the trick.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2017, 05:06 PM   #45
Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 53
Peanut oil smoke point is 435 F , so that or higher should be fine.
BlueMoods is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 12:46 PM   #46
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
Wink

Last night, off line I was looking at these numbers and discovered that some of them are not correct translations to Celsius. So I can't say for sure that any of them are correct.

But at least I refurbished my crepe pan with several hours of work, this is at about half way, I used grape seed oil:





I should have used one of these:
Light/Refined Olive Oil 465F/240C Yes
Soybean Oil 450F/230C Yes
Peanut Oil 450F/230C Yes
Clarified Butter 450F/230C No
Corn Oil 450F/230C Yes
Sunflower Oil 440F/225C
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 01:32 PM   #47
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 295
The key to seasoning a cast iron or carbon steel pan is to apply a very thin coat and then wipe it ALL off before applying heat. You will still leave a thin film of oil and that is all you want. Regular cooking oil works fine. Flax seed oil is supposed to be the best.
Stock Pot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 01:38 PM   #48
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
Wink

I learned a lot last night just doing it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
The key to seasoning a cast iron or carbon steel pan is to apply a very thin coat and then wipe it ALL off before applying heat. You will still leave a thin film of oil and that is all you want. Regular cooking oil works fine. Flax seed oil is supposed to be the best.
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2017, 06:17 PM   #49
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
Question Injera pancakes stickiing

Well I tryed cooking Injera in my referbished pan, but it stuck. It was easyer to clean off because of the oil. The oil was hot enough for the batter to sizzle right a way.

I think the batter was too wet. the pan works fine with egg mixed into nut meal. maybe I should just stick to a thicker batter.
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2017, 12:16 PM   #50
Senior Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 115
The high heat oil recommendations were wrong!!!

Oil high in omega-3 fatty acids in particular, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Free radicals are actually what enable the polymerization. Flax seed oil has the lowest smoking temperature oil I have seen listed but it is highest in omega-3 fatty acids (57% ALA).

The polymerization process is initiated when something causes the release of free radicals in the oil. So the higher the free fatty acid content in the oil to begin with, the quicker it will break down and start polymerization. This is exactly what you want to season a pan.

I think I should give up trying to cook with oil on a fragile steel pan surface. And just cook eggs in hot water in a stainless steel pan.
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2017, 07:08 PM   #51
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,313
cast iron

Something doesn't look right with. that pan. It's definitely not cast iron. It doesn't look like carbon steel. And the seasoning is nowhere close to what it should be.

Correctly seasoned iron or carbon steel is black. Not blotchy, and runs all the way to the rim.

Is it possible that the pan in question is aluminum or less possibly stainless?
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
nonstick pans

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.