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Old 10-23-2013, 09:36 AM   #1
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Food Scales

I recently bought a food scale. I've heard that using a scale to measure for ingredients is a better method. What are your thoughts on food scales. Do you use them? How and why?

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Old 10-23-2013, 09:50 AM   #2
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I only use scale for baking.
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Old 10-23-2013, 09:59 AM   #3
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Its one of the few gadgets that I dont have.

It's really only needed, like Charlie says, for baking because that is much more chemistry-dependent and thus correct measurements are important.

You need recipes that give weights, also.
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Old 10-23-2013, 10:01 AM   #4
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I use a scale regularly. It has become indispensable for me. I am converting all my baking recipes to weights as I use them. I also use it for portion control and because I'm pretty anal dividing things evenly.
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Old 10-23-2013, 10:06 AM   #5
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I use mine quite a bit. If you're dieting, they're especially nice for weighing portion sizes. Also comes in handy for weight measurements in European recipes.
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Old 10-23-2013, 12:35 PM   #6
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Some cookbooks only use weight for recipes, so a scale is the only way to go.
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Old 10-23-2013, 12:46 PM   #7
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I make a lot of Danish food and all the non-liquid ingredients are by weight. I really like the tare function. I weigh something into a mixing bowl, zero it and weigh the next ingredient into the same bowl.
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Old 10-23-2013, 01:56 PM   #8
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I have quite a few recipes that call for 2 pounds of potatoes or a pound of grated cheese. My scale is handy for that. I also use it when I'm cutting large roasts into smaller pieces, or dividing a few pounds of ground beef to freeze, so I have 1-pound packages, and when I'm canning, to measure a pound of various veggies.
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Old 10-23-2013, 02:07 PM   #9
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I have a Salter scale and have had a scale for years. Probably close to or more than 20 years and I'd be lost without it.

I use it for all kinds of recipes, not just baking. One of the things I appreciate about using a scale when I cook is that I soil far fewer measuring cups and spoons as I cook, which makes cleaning up quicker and easier.

I also find it quite useful for buying foods in bulk quantities and dividing it up in portions that we most often use.

My previous scale "died" a couple of years ago and I was lost without it the few days it took to get a new one. I didn't realize I depended on my scale so much.

As taxlady already mentioned, the tare function is most helpful.
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Old 10-23-2013, 02:22 PM   #10
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I bought mine on sample sale. Paid 10 bucks for a $70 dollars scale. I wish I knew at the time what a great deal that was. I would have bought all 4 or 5 samples they had. I probably would even use more.
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Old 10-23-2013, 02:47 PM   #11
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I'm diabetic. A scale for portion control in pretty much mandatory. For example, have you ever tried to measure 1/2 cup of dry spaghetti with a measuring cup?
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Old 10-23-2013, 04:07 PM   #12
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I'm diabetic. A scale for portion control in pretty much mandatory. For example, have you ever tried to measure 1/2 cup of dry spaghetti with a measuring cup?
No. How do you measure 1/2 cup of dry spaghetti with a scale?
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Old 10-23-2013, 04:19 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I use a scale regularly. It has become indispensable for me. I am converting all my baking recipes to weights as I use them. I also use it for portion control and because I'm pretty anal dividing things evenly.
I'm with you, I wouldn't be without one. If I didn't weigh pasta before cooking it, I'd always cook too much.

I'm like you being anal about dividing things. Pizza dough, bread dough, cake batter. I also use it to weigh out portions from large packs of meat before sealing with my vacuum sealer, especially ground beef.
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Old 10-23-2013, 07:01 PM   #14
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I'm with you, I wouldn't be without one. If I didn't weigh pasta before cooking it, I'd always cook too much.

I'm like you being anal about dividing things. Pizza dough, bread dough, cake batter. I also use it to weigh out portions from large packs of meat before sealing with my vacuum sealer, especially ground beef.
Whether I'm making Bagels or meatballs I use a scale. I know most think that's totally unnecessary. It probably is, but I'm stuck with the need for accuracy. I guess that's why I was so good in accounting.
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:34 PM   #15
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Our scale was originally purchased for weighing snakes in order to determine proper dosage of antibiotic (Inj) if needed. Our collection is now at two animals and the scale has become a kitchen device.
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:44 PM   #16
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No. How do you measure 1/2 cup of dry spaghetti with a scale?
You convert 1/2 cup to 2 ounces.
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:55 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
You convert 1/2 cup to 2 ounces.

Your diet tells you to cook a half cup of dry pasta. Did they tell you the weight equivalent or did you have to figure that out for yourself?

Have you tried the low carb pasta? We had tried Dreamfields and found it to be an excellent substitute for regular pasta.
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Old 10-24-2013, 04:48 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
You convert 1/2 cup to 2 ounces.
You looked that up, right? Otherwise you are confusing weight and volume.
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Old 10-24-2013, 06:53 PM   #19
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I have always used scales for cooking but recently started using cup measures. I was a bit flummoxed when confronted with measuring out "1 cup of butter". How do you measure cups in something that is neither dry (like flour and sugar), nor liquid? I suppose you have to wait for the butter to soften enough to scoop into the cup? Anyway, I thought most US recipes called for "sticks" of butter rather than cups?

All I can say is, it was messy! (But I managed).

Oh and yes, the tare feature is marvellously useful.
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:30 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I have always used scales for cooking but recently started using cup measures. I was a bit flummoxed when confronted with measuring out "1 cup of butter". How do you measure cups in something that is neither dry (like flour and sugar), nor liquid? I suppose you have to wait for the butter to soften enough to scoop into the cup? Anyway, I thought most US recipes called for "sticks" of butter rather than cups?

All I can say is, it was messy! (But I managed).

Oh and yes, the tare feature is marvellously useful.
Katy, for future reference, a pound of butter equals 2 cups. Each quarter pound stick contains 8 tablespoons or a half cup.
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