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Old 09-28-2021, 12:22 PM   #1
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Can stainless steel pot be heated with high heat?

The precaution label on it says "use with low heat", and it's stainless steel pot, Does it imply that stainless steel is not recommended to use with high heat?

Why

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Old 09-28-2021, 01:49 PM   #2
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I have found over the years that most cookware manufacturers recommend low to medium heat… even from makers of quality clad stainless. It's kinda BS for the good stuff, and I believe they say it to avoid warranty claims down the road.

Most of my SS is Tramontina Tri-Ply and I often use high heat to sear food. But with that said, if you just leave the pan on the burner for a couple/three minutes it will get plenty hot even over medium heat.
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Old 09-28-2021, 02:46 PM   #3
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I use my SS pans on my high heat burners with no problems. I guess I never read any instructions on how to use, but they probably had things like that, sort of as disclaimers, for when people leave empty pans on burners too long, and they warp.

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Old 09-28-2021, 02:55 PM   #4
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The precaution label on it says "use with low heat", and it's stainless steel pot, Does it imply that stainless steel is not recommended to use with high heat?

Why
What kind of pot is it? Is it a single layer of steel or triple layered?
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Old 09-28-2021, 04:07 PM   #5
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Thicker SS is less likely to warp with high heat. However, high heat can cause any steel to discolor. Ferrous metals are poor conductors of heat, meaning that he metal touched directly by the flame, or burner, will be significantly hotter tan the rest of the pan. These hot spots will expand faster than the cooler parts, which is what warps the pan. It's rare, but if you immerse a screaming hot pan into icy water, the outside layer of metal can contract so much faster than the deeper layer that a cast iron pan can shatter, just as glass does.

SS will have the same issue, however, it is malleable enough that it won't shatter, but will warp.

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Old 09-28-2021, 06:34 PM   #6
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What kind of pot is it? Is it a single layer of steel or triple layered?
I am not sure but likely to be single layer because it is not expensive.

By the way,
I've found a line of precaution on the label

"Do not use over a stove"

At the same time, there is another line "Do not use over IH"

I am so confused....

Could there be third type of way of heating in the kitchen in addition to stove (open flame) and IH?
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Old 09-28-2021, 06:56 PM   #7
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Made in China, I'm guessing?

Maybe a problem with translation?
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Old 09-28-2021, 06:59 PM   #8
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Made in China, I'm guessing?

Maybe a problem with translation?
Kenny lives in China
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Old 09-29-2021, 07:35 AM   #9
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Somewhat related question, and please forgive the ignorance. I ask from a learner's perspective ...

Other than foods that get boiled (noodles/rice), when is it appropriate to cook on high heat? I can't think of a food I've made in recent years that needed more than medium.
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Old 09-29-2021, 12:33 PM   #10
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Somewhat related question, and please forgive the ignorance. I ask from a learner's perspective ...

Other than foods that get boiled (noodles/rice), when is it appropriate to cook on high heat? I can't think of a food I've made in recent years that needed more than medium.
It's easy to think of. Recently I am frying rice a lot and my experience is you have to fry with high heat in order to dry out the rice grains, yes you can fry with low or medium heat but it will take a long time which won't make it taste better. I also turn to high heat and fry when the food is oiled well


by the way I like to turn to high heat and fry the food quickly for a few seconds before it is ready to serve because it will also help reducing last oil left on the food, making the dishes less oily.
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Old 09-29-2021, 04:46 PM   #11
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I have a frying pan with a triple bottom. It is warped so it wobbles a bit on the burner but I love it.



The pressure cookers, like Presto, if they have water in them as they are used for canning or pressure cooking are allowed to go to a higher temperature than boiling temperature (212 deg F) safely and they do not warp and become useless. In the canning group I belong to, most of the warped bottoms of the pressure canners happen when they are allowed to run dry. If there is a leak in the seal or have to process for too long of a time, they will run dry and overheat and bow out on the bottom.
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Old 09-29-2021, 11:58 PM   #12
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Is it sign that my stainless steel pan is having problem?

The stainless steel pan was bought for approx. $200 (usd) in early 90s by my parents and so it should be of decent quality. It still looks nice and is still being used today. One day after cleaning and rinsing it very thoroughly, I wiped it dry with a paper towel, and I put the towel nearby, I found that after hours part of the paper towel that it got wet turned purple or black I'm not sure. It's supposed to be water and paper only, how could it turn purple...

I don't have a picture on hand..... Is it abnormal??
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Old 09-30-2021, 07:58 AM   #13
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High heat us used when searing scallops, cooking steaks/chops,, when stir frying, etc.

Medium high heat is good when deglazing, with flambé', when reducing liquid sauces, concentrating broth/stock, bringing water to a boil, etc.

Medium heat is used for frying eggs, pancakes, french toast, grilled cheese, grilled PBJ's, steaming veggies, Toasting bread, making mac & cheese, for cooking canned veggies, basically any canned food that is to be heated on the stove top, instant mashed potatoes, making a roux/béchamel/volute, making gravies, making candies. i.e. melting sugar, , etc.

Lo heat is used for simmering pasta sauces, brazing, soups, e made mixes, such as dressing, poaching eggs, simmering bones and cartilage for stocks, and broth, making ganache, melting chocolate, making pastry cream, etc.

Usually, a recipe will give you the correct heat setting to use.

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Old 10-01-2021, 07:41 AM   #14
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High heat us used when searing scallops, cooking steaks/chops,, when stir frying, etc.

Medium high heat is good when deglazing, with flambé', when reducing liquid sauces, concentrating broth/stock, bringing water to a boil, etc.

Medium heat is used for frying eggs, pancakes, french toast, grilled cheese, grilled PBJ's, steaming veggies, Toasting bread, making mac & cheese, for cooking canned veggies, basically any canned food that is to be heated on the stove top, instant mashed potatoes, making a roux/béchamel/volute, making gravies, making candies. i.e. melting sugar, , etc.

Lo heat is used for simmering pasta sauces, brazing, soups, e made mixes, such as dressing, poaching eggs, simmering bones and cartilage for stocks, and broth, making ganache, melting chocolate, making pastry cream, etc.

Usually, a recipe will give you the correct heat setting to use.

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I think we should avoid high heat for cooking steaks or it will over burn easily
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Old 10-01-2021, 10:27 AM   #15
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I think we should avoid high heat for cooking steaks or it will over burn easily
No, it won't, because you only want to sear a good steak for a few minutes on both sides - just enough to brown it well, so it's medium rare in the center.
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Old 10-01-2021, 12:12 PM   #16
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The stainless steel pan was bought for approx. $200 (usd) in early 90s by my parents and so it should be of decent quality. It still looks nice and is still being used today. One day after cleaning and rinsing it very thoroughly, I wiped it dry with a paper towel, and I put the towel nearby, I found that after hours part of the paper towel that it got wet turned purple or black I'm not sure. It's supposed to be water and paper only, how could it turn purple...

I don't have a picture on hand..... Is it abnormal??
Sometimes the metal will discolor as you described when a starchy food is cooked in the pan. It's harmless. Barkeepers Friend or other scouring powder will clean it off with no hard scrubbing.
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Old 10-01-2021, 01:11 PM   #17
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Sometimes the metal will discolor as you described when a starchy food is cooked in the pan. It's harmless. Barkeepers Friend or other scouring powder will clean it off with no hard scrubbing.
Oh, that almost iridescent mark that you sometimes get on stainless steel pots. I use Lagostina stainless steel cleaner to wipe that off.
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Old 10-01-2021, 02:20 PM   #18
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Oh, that almost iridescent mark that you sometimes get on stainless steel pots. I use Lagostina stainless steel cleaner to wipe that off.
Sure. Actually, with BKF, there is no scrubbing required. The oxalic acid in the BKF removes the stains on contact.
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Old 10-01-2021, 07:18 PM   #19
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Sure. Actually, with BKF, there is no scrubbing required. The oxalic acid in the BKF removes the stains on contact.
I get the Lagostina one, because it's available locally. I have only found BKF online. However, I did write "wipe off". No scrubbing needed with the Lagostina stuff either, for those iridescent discolourations.
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Old 10-01-2021, 07:27 PM   #20
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...However, I did write "wipe off". No scrubbing needed with the Lagostina stuff either, for those iridescent discolourations.
Yes, you did. I missed it.
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