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Old 09-30-2018, 11:10 AM   #21
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That's a good point Caslon, and I've had the same experience. The pans that I haven't done much oil frying in (1/4" or deeper) are the stickiest. My big skillet used for shallow deep fry and my flat griddle I use for burgers, etc. are my best seasoned pans.
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Old 10-01-2018, 09:55 AM   #22
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I've never seen rust from a pan sitting idle.

Me, neither until I moved part time to Cape Cod. Its insanely humid here ….
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Old 10-04-2018, 10:34 AM   #23
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I'm still finding my comfort zone with cast iron. My mother was a decent home cook, but I never way her use a CI pan of any kind, so I didn't grow up with it. I finally bought one about a year ago, in part from reading about it so often on this forum.

My CI skillet is not as nonstick as a new teflon pan, but it is as good as my ~8 year old Bakers & Chefs 12" nonstick fry pan (bought at Sam's Club, but also available from Amazon). It's a Lodge brand, came preseasoned, and I put it through a full normal oven seasoning before I used it the first time.

After cooking with it, I wash in hot water and I use a stainless steel chain mail scrubber to rub off any chunks, then just a dishrag, rinse, dry with a paper towel, then on the stovetop with a light coating of oil all over just until it's fairly hot.

It lives in a drawer in the bottom of the stove along with the broiler pan and my pizza stone.
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Old 12-05-2018, 10:47 AM   #24
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It would take a monumental amount of polymerized (basically burned in) oil to fill in the surface of most new cast iron pans to a point of slickness. There are some premium pans out there for which this MIGHT not be the case. Proteins will release from a properly heated pan, even if it's bumpy, so as long as you understand how to cook this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

All this being the case, you should just start cooking in the pan. One or two seasoning sessions won't do much of anything given the state of the surface of the pan in the first place.

An alternative would be a French black steel pan which comes smooth as a baby's bottom right out of the box, but won't recall the days of wagon trains heading out west like cast iron will.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:05 PM   #25
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Cast iron rusts if you look at it cross-eyed. A couple of initial seasonings covering the entire pan, inside and out, with at least keep the rut at bay while you build up a good coating.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:11 PM   #26
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Cast iron rusts if you look at it cross-eyed. A couple of initial seasonings covering the entire pan, inside and out, with at least keep the rut at bay while you build up a good coating.
I think the pan in question has at least the factory seasoning, which I understand covers all of the pan, surely this is enough to prevent storage rust. That said, these pans as well as carbon steel pans, need to be put on a burner or the oven and dried out after use, assuming they were rinsed with water. I do this even on well-used carbon steel.


Not a fan of bare CI. Carbon steel has its uses.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:23 PM   #27
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My comment assumed a raw ci pan. The last ci skillet I bought was factory seasoned. I just started cooking in it.
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:28 PM   #28
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My new CI skillet (seasoned) didn't stay non-stick when I cooked bacon, thinking it would. It wasn't until I oil fried some chicken that my CI pan got non stick.
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Old 12-05-2018, 07:28 PM   #29
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Caslon,
Bacon now days that you commonly find is sugar cured that part of why cooked bacon or heavy sugared BBQ turns sticky and becomes a gooey mess that makes it hard to clean. When I restore a older one I like to just sauté vegetables stove top and brown chicken, pork a couple of minutes per side then in a temp ready oven to finish,,, and after a couple months it becomes a lot more slick and darker of course.

I Myself cooking with a new restored one or off the shelf uncooked in type skillets I use a wee bit more oil and needed till the skillet starts to keep and hold it’s own so to speak.

Oddly I was just restoring one and finished seasoning it today. I’t was found and mismatched by makers, the price was right and I wanted to lid for one I use a lot.

Keep in mind you can turn what looks like trash to treasure that will out live you.
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Old 12-05-2018, 07:50 PM   #30
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Just a quick picture of the lid I just found as is before cleaning
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Old 08-02-2019, 12:00 AM   #31
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Absolutely love my Lodge CI wok. I fire up the oven to 500, heat it for about 10 minutes while prepping veggies, etc., for the stir fry. I do this with all my CI pans, heat them up in the oven first. Love, love cooking with CI pans.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:50 AM   #32
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Just cook in it -- searing, sautes, frying -- foods that don't release a lot of water until it's obvious the pan is broken in, 'seasoned' whatever you want to call it.

Some people spend more time with these pans than they would tinned copper. That completely defeats the purpose of what is supposed to be robust cookware in the first place.

I sometimes wonder if people aren't secretly thrilled when for some reason a pan loses its seasoning so they can lose an entire afternoon if not more fooling with it.

Go cook some great food.
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Old 05-31-2020, 10:33 AM   #33
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African American gentleman on YouTube has THE best way to season CI and it starts by putting the skillets in a self cleaning oven. Some folks used to even throw them in a fire. CI can almost always be brought back to life and/or seasoned properly.



Forget all the myths you've heard....watch his vids.


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Old 05-31-2020, 10:38 AM   #34
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African American gentleman on YouTube has THE best way to season CI and it starts by putting the skillets in a self cleaning oven...
Running a CI skillet through the cleaning cycle of an oven will burn off all seasoning. Then you have to start from scratch.
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Old 05-31-2020, 10:51 AM   #35
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Running a CI skillet through the cleaning cycle of an oven will burn off all seasoning. Then you have to start from scratch.
That is not necessarily a bad thing, but it does bear understanding prior to doing so.
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Old 05-31-2020, 10:57 AM   #36
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That's why I said to WATCH his vid. You start over(and that goes for new skillets as well). Then he has a section on oiling and maintenance after cooking.


If you think your seasoning efforts are perfect....just skip to his maintenance section.



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Old 05-31-2020, 11:49 AM   #37
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That's why I said to WATCH his vid. You start over(and that goes for new skillets as well). Then he has a section on oiling and maintenance after cooking.


If you think your seasoning efforts are perfect....just skip to his maintenance section.



Kevin
It would be helpful if you provided a link to the video. I imagine there's more than one.
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Old 05-31-2020, 03:04 PM   #38
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I would be happy to provide the link, but I think honestly, he's the only African American gentleman on YouTube with this process.


My main computer was confiscated, so I'm on a borrowed one. I'll see what I can do.


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Old 05-31-2020, 03:08 PM   #39
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Ask and ye shall receive:
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Old 05-31-2020, 05:09 PM   #40
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It would take a monumental amount of polymerized (basically burned in) oil to fill in the surface of most new cast iron pans to a point of slickness. There are some premium pans out there for which this MIGHT not be the case. Proteins will release from a properly heated pan, even if it's bumpy, so as long as you understand how to cook this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

All this being the case, you should just start cooking in the pan. One or two seasoning sessions won't do much of anything given the state of the surface of the pan in the first place.

An alternative would be a French black steel pan which comes smooth as a baby's bottom right out of the box, but won't recall the days of wagon trains heading out west like cast iron will.
As metals go, none of the ferrous metals are good heat conductors. The advantage of cast iron is its thermal mass. I will develop hot spots due to the poor heat conductivity of the metal. but once heated evenly, it maintains its temperature better when cold food is added to the pan. This makes it great for everything from searing foods, to slow simmering, to stewing, braising, baking, and roasting. Its sturdiness makes it even great over an open cooking fie at camp, ot for use over charcoal. When seasoned properly, it will not add metallic flavor to foods, and is virtually non-stick..The downside, is that it can shatter catastrophically it plunged creaming hot into cold water., Cast iron is brittle, and doesn't have any malleability.

Mineral steel, also known as high-carbon steel,, is lighter in weight, ans is as durable, and stick freed as is cast iron. However, the pans are thinner, and develop even more not-spots. They also don't hold heat as well, that is, when food is added to the pan, the metal quickly transfers its heat energy to the food, an the metal cools significantly. This is somewhat offset by its ability to absorb heat more quickly from a heat source though. If you think abut it, a carbon steel wok is simply a uniquely shaped carbon steel pan. its only real difference s that it has high, rounded sides, which both bleed off the heat from the pan bottom, and can be used as a lower temp warming area, and which allow you to add grater amounts of food. The bottom, where the heat is concentrated, is kept hot with a very hot heat source, such as a blow torch, or gas flame. You can use the same cooking techniques with an carbon steel pan. You simply need to understand the physical properties of the metal, and how it reacts to heat.

As far as the grainy texture of new Lodge, and other brands of CI pans go, as you season it, and cook with it, over time, the cooking surface becomes smooth. But even before it does, that grainy texture will not decrease its non-stick performance. Also, it you go online, you can find both Griswold z9 the best CI pans ever made), and Wagner CI [ans that are both inexpensive, and have that desired smooth, slick cooking surface. These pans are way undervalued, and are a treasure to own, and use.

I hope this post has been helpful.

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