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Old 01-15-2018, 11:39 PM   #21
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The OP asked the question, "Is there any reason to keep and use a Dutch Oven?"

My response is, "YES!" There is a reason to keep and use a DO.

If anyone would be surprised by members of a forum called "Discuss Cooking" voicing a preference for a DO over the obvious convenience of a crock pot, should keep in mind that many of us are devout foodies, who love to eat good food, and also enjoy cooking good food.

Sure, there are times when scratch cooking the hard way is just not in the cards, and you drop back and punt. But, whenever possible, I know I prefer to do whatever it takes to really focus on my cooking, and not let some appliance cook for me. I think it pays off. That's my experience, anyway.

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Old 01-16-2018, 12:25 AM   #22
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It came down to cost for me. My crock pot cost me $10 on sale. I haven't seen a Dutch Oven yet for $10.
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:31 AM   #23
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I don't like the way most food tastes after it's cooked for so long in a slow cooker. It generally seems to have cooked all the flavor and moisture out of the food. Sauces don't help overcooked foods.
Agreed. The often overcooked food from a crockpot has an "odd" one note flavor to me. In addition, I'm a control freak when it comes to cooking so unattended crockpots don't do a thing for me.
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Old 01-16-2018, 07:59 AM   #24
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Wow, all these replies and the OP is MIA. I know you can get a crock pot with a metal insert, but can you sear/brown with the insert in the crock pot? Still, I asked the OP if they could sear/brown in their crock pot.
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Old 01-16-2018, 08:38 AM   #25
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You can only do one thing at a time though. If you are doing some slow cooked meat and veggies that are to be served over rice, then you need both appliances, or you have to finish one dish, then clean up and start the second - probably not the best way to go if you have another option.
Or you can make rice in 15 minutes in the microwave, like I do
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Old 01-16-2018, 08:50 AM   #26
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Or you can make rice in 15 minutes in the microwave, like I do
Or about 22 minutes on the stove top/induction burner.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:24 AM   #27
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Or you can make rice in 15 minutes in the microwave, like I do
You are talking about white rice, not brown rice (the healthier option).
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:26 AM   #28
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I find making rice an easy cooking task. It just sits on a back burner and cooks while I do other stuff. I never saw the need for a specialized utensil.
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:40 AM   #29
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That's not what Kenji concluded in the article Andy linked to. What's the difference between leaving one appliance on for several hours versus another? He provided statistics, too.
So, you would leave a Dutch oven on the stove while you run out and get a haircut, do a little shopping, and fill up your gas tank? Good luck with that.

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Old 01-16-2018, 12:01 PM   #30
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You are talking about white rice, not brown rice (the healthier option).
Actually, I'm talking about the rice medley I buy. It contains white, par-cooked brown, red and wild rice.
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Old 01-16-2018, 12:04 PM   #31
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So, you would leave a Dutch oven on the stove while you run out and get a haircut, do a little shopping, and fill up your gas tank? Good luck with that.

Are you seriously suggesting an oil fire like that can result from simmering food in a Dutch oven at low heat? Oddly enough, I've been making food that way for decades and I have never once had a kitchen fire.

You really should read the article before commenting. Kenji's method is to put the DO in the oven at 200-250 degrees. He also - as I said before - provided statistics on the number of kitchen fires and resulting damage caused by slow cookers versus ovens.
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Old 01-16-2018, 02:43 PM   #32
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So, you would leave a Dutch oven on the stove while you run out and get a haircut, do a little shopping, and fill up your gas tank? Good luck with that.

Fear mongering much? If ovens were that dangerous we'd all have cooking areas separate from the rest of the house, installed in a fireproof building. Any electric heating appliance is potentially more hazardous than a properly functioning oven. Operating it at 250° is probably a lot safer than using just about any small electric cooker.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:32 PM   #33
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I prefer a 2 or 3 hour braise to a 4+ hour slow cook. It's already been mentioned that a Crockpot won't sear or brown meats - they have to be started in another pan first.

I use my dutch oven far more than I use the Crockpot.

Me, too. You can always tell food that's been cooked in a crockpot. It has an unpleasant aura about it, IMO. The protein is often very overcooked and everything tastes flat.

Food cooked in a dutch oven just tastes better and more ably cooked.

I have two crockpots and only use them for keeping foods I cook in other ways hot.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:36 PM   #34
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So, you would leave a Dutch oven on the stove while you run out and get a haircut, do a little shopping, and fill up your gas tank? Good luck with that.



Isnt that an Instant Pot ??
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Old 01-16-2018, 07:21 PM   #35
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So, you would leave a Dutch oven on the stove while you run out and get a haircut, do a little shopping, and fill up your gas tank? Good luck with that.

A crockpot is nothing more than an electric burner with food simmering in a pot. So, the crockpot is no more or less safe than a DO on my electric cooktop. I've done it many times.

Besides, that is a photo of a grease fire in a skillet.

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Old 01-18-2018, 07:35 AM   #36
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Thank you all for your input. I was waiting to get a good/varied response from everyone.

It looks like my wife and myself are sticking with the crockpot. We've used them for over 7 years with no problem or complaints about the food. The last DO we had was Cast Aluminum. Didn't work very well with tomato based stews/sauces. As for an Enamel Coated DO. . . I keep reading reviews of the coating flaking off into the food. I guess there are pro's and con's to everything.
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:32 AM   #37
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Thank you all for your input. I was waiting to get a good/varied response from everyone.

It looks like my wife and myself are sticking with the crockpot. We've used them for over 7 years with no problem or complaints about the food. The last DO we had was Cast Aluminum. Didn't work very well with tomato based stews/sauces. As for an Enamel Coated DO. . . I keep reading reviews of the coating flaking off into the food. I guess there are pro's and con's to everything.
I think that depends on the quality of the cookware you buy. I've been using Le Creuset enameled cast iron for many years. It has never chipped or flaked. Also, I have never paid full price for it. I've always bought it from the outlet store (one piece was a floor model for 75% off) or recently, from eBay.
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:47 AM   #38
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The flaking of enameled CI is news to me, too. I guess if you buy cheap Chinese no-name CI, it is possible.

Sounds to me like you (the OP) had your mind made up before you asked your question. It looks like all that was accomplished on this thread was an argument that we didn't need to have.

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Old 01-18-2018, 10:40 AM   #39
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Sounds to me like you (the OP) had your mind made up before you asked your question. It looks like all that was accomplished on this thread was an argument that we didn't need to have.

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Useful comments/advice I can always use. My mind was not made up starting this thread. Just because the majority of comments favor a DO does not mean I should be forced to agree. My wife and I discussed this again yesterday. I am handicapped. Picking up a hot DO from the oven that could weigh 25 lbs+ is not an option for me. My wife would be in the same boat. She has difficulty picking up our 20 lb. dog.

Although the prospect of owning a DO and using it would be nice, since this one is not dishwasher safe, it would be difficult cleaning it by hand in the sink.

Again, I thank everyone for their comments. Even from the peanut gallery.
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Old 01-18-2018, 10:49 AM   #40
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The flaking of enameled CI is news to me, too. I guess if you buy cheap Chinese no-name CI, it is possible.

Sounds to me like you (the OP) had your mind made up before you asked your question. It looks like all that was accomplished on this thread was an argument that we didn't need to have.

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I've been using a "cheap Chinese no-name" DO for about 10 years (paid $39 at Sam's Club) with no issues whatsoever. Seems to work just as well as a $150 Le Creuset.
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