"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-26-2017, 09:13 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 205
Help With Cast Iron Pan!

I marinated a flatiron steak in Korean Beef Marinade that I made. The marinade called for brown sugar, soysauce, etc. I cooked the beef in my cast iron frying pan. The steak turned out great -- tender and delicious! BUT ... my poor pan suffered. I think the brown sugar in the marinade carmelized and now my pan has areas of thick burnt sugar. I have soaked the pan in hot water and mild dishwashing soap, scrubbed it with a white Mr. Clean eraser sponge, but no luck. I hate using an SOS soap pad on cast iron, but I don't know what else to do. Any suggestions? The pan has been passed down from my grandmother so it has been well used. I need help!! Thanks for any ideas!!!

ShellyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2017, 09:23 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,407
Cover the bottom with water and bring it to a boil. Simmer for a while to loosen the gunk. Make sure the pan doesn't go dry.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2017, 09:33 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Cover the bottom with water and bring it to a boil. Simmer for a while to loosen the gunk. Make sure the pan doesn't go dry.
I agree, plus I would add that you might not want to let some residue freak you out. My 80-year-old Griswold has taken a few hits, but eventually recovers. It doesn't always look perfect, but cooks great.

BTW, I don't think using some Scotchbrite or even steel wool is a problem, as long as you lube them with oil, not soap and water. Others may disagree, and if so, they will say so.

No soap!

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2017, 09:34 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,766
I know there are many here who believe a cast iron pan is good for everything, but I'm not one of them. There are good and valid reasons why we have other options that our ancestors didn't have, and here's just one example.
Andy's response sounds like a good one. Good luck.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2017, 09:45 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 205
Thanks to all of you for your prompt answers! Wow! I'm going to try boiling water in the pan. Hopefully, that will help to loosen the burnt sugar. I'll let you know what happens. Thanks, again!
ShellyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2017, 11:28 PM   #6
Cook
 
Steven c's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 66
Shelly, I also agree with the boiling water. it will start to loosen the sticky stuff and then scrape the bottom and sides will a steel spatula with rounded corners while the water Is in it should do the trick. Just cover the pan a 1/4 " or so with water or a tad more.

I try to avoid cooking anything that has a sugar base in cast iron as it will glue it's self to the bottom of the pan. I also agree there are other pans little better suited for some of those sauces other than cast.

I have one I've been using lately and getting it seasoned the last 8or9 months and tonight I did a tender loin with onion and mushrooms on the sides. When finished I pull it out to rest with the mushrooms and onions made a rue and deglaze with stock for a light gravy sauce for the tatters and loin. When done it cleaned up with some running hot water and a dish cloth and nothing more. It's seldom I have to use water to clean it up. Then just dry it good on a low burner and wipe with a touch of oil and it ready to roll for the next time.
__________________
Looking for old Walther PP pistol clip/magazine #981029
Steven c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2017, 05:11 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ring of fire. So. Calif.
Posts: 3,287
Start off by seasoning a CI pan. That's easy. A few drops of oil, and heat it till the pan smokes. It's seasoned. What's necessary is not over cleaning the pan after each cooking, to build up a good carbon coating. I soak the pan in water after frying, and most of the junk that looks like it's sticking comes right off.

Advice: Let it soak. No soap and keep hot water to a minimum (while trying to build up a good carbon layer). Do not use boiling water to get the pan cleaned pronto. Just soak the pan in water for 20 minutes.

I'm just advising about getting a CI carbon buildup going. After many years of carbon build up, you can probably use all the soap and hot water you want. For me that's a few years away.
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2017, 09:10 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Start off by seasoning a CI pan. That's easy. A few drops of oil, and heat it till the pan smokes. It's seasoned. What's necessary is not over cleaning the pan after each cooking, to build up a good carbon coating. I soak the pan in water after frying, and most of the junk that looks like it's sticking comes right off.

Advice: Let it soak. No soap and keep hot water to a minimum (while trying to build up a good carbon layer). Do not use boiling water to get the pan cleaned pronto. Just soak the pan in water for 20 minutes.

I'm just advising about getting a CI carbon buildup going. After many years of carbon build up, you can probably use all the soap and hot water you want. For me that's a few years away.

This doesn't help the OP, though
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2017, 09:31 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 295
When something like that happens and soaking and scrubbing with coarse salt don't work I use a ScothBrite pad on the affected areas and re-season the pan. I do try to avoid cooking anything with a sugary sauce, such as BBQ sauce, in cast iron, though. I usually use an enameled pan for that sort of thing.
Stock Pot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2017, 12:15 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 13,331
I also try to avoid using CI when grilling anything sugary.
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2017, 01:10 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 295
I just ordered and received today a scrub pad size piece of something like chain mail that is supposed to be good on cast iron for this sort of thing. I'll report back after I have used it. It is not supposed to scratch the cast iron finish/seasoning.
Stock Pot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2017, 02:59 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 205
Thanks, again, everyone. I'm trying the hot water method and, hopefully, it will help loosen the burnt on sugar. I'll let you know.

Stock Pot ~ Please let us know about the scrub pad you just purchased. I hope it works!!
ShellyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2017, 03:35 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
I just ordered and received today a scrub pad size piece of something like chain mail that is supposed to be good on cast iron for this sort of thing. I'll report back after I have used it. It is not supposed to scratch the cast iron finish/seasoning.
I have one from the Ringer that I have had very good luck with. Several brands on the market now.
__________________
My blog https://jamesstrange.com/
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 03:13 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 5
I absolutely agree I absolutely agree with the advice about boiling water. And then I use a scrub brush and more hot water over the sink to get the debris out. After that I put a little flax oil on the pan just a very very thin layer, heat it a bit and wipe it off with a paper towel. Good to go. One thing you really do not want to do is use dishwashing soap or any kind of soap really. If you've done so you probably want to re-season the pan.
everylastbite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 03:48 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 205
The boiling water worked perfectly. I used a spatula to scrape the hard bits a little, but most of the sticky sugar came off with the boiling water. I did season the pan again and it is good to go again! Thanks everyone for all your help!!!
ShellyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 04:56 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by everylastbite View Post
One thing you really do not want to do is use dishwashing soap or any kind of soap really. If you've done so you probably want to re-season the pan.

Soap is fine in a cast iron pan that's well seasoned.

It may be just what is needed after the boiling water.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 07:33 PM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by everylastbite View Post
...One thing you really do not want to do is use dishwashing soap or any kind of soap really. If you've done so you probably want to re-season the pan.
Soap should definitely NOT be a problem. I use a soapy sponge whenever I need it. I don't have to re-season my pans. The whole point of seasoning a CI pan is to create a durable surface that can protect the metal and provide a slick surface for foods.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2017, 09:09 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Denver
Posts: 24
Boiling the water always helps too clean the mess, especially if you are cooking caramel
johnperkins899 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2017, 10:22 AM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California
Posts: 205
Totally agree with you, John! Boiling hot water in the pan and a little gentle scrubbing does the trick every time!
ShellyCooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cast iron

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.