"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-28-2021, 10:57 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Far East
Posts: 333
Is glass good for cooking?

I found a rice cooker today that came with compatible pot made of glass, and it claims it's the first ever in the market. Yes, most rice cookers I saw came with nonstick pot, but I'd like to know if glass is good for cooking? Will heat break it?

kenny1999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 11:08 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 26,120
There are all kinds of glass dishes on the market - casserole dishes, pie pans, etc. They're specially designed not to break when used as directed.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 12:11 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 26,745
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I have a loaf pan, several "lasagna" pans, soufflé pans, and other pans made of glass that was specifically made to be usable in the oven or microwave. They are not made to use on the stove top. I use these regularly and I have had most of them for over 20 years and some for about 35 years.

I would assume that the glass in the rice cooker is safe to use in that rice cooker. I wouldn't hesitate to buy it and use it.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 12:51 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 13,506
It’s good. Buy it if you need a new rice cooker.
I like the traditional non stick aluminum. It’s light and non breakable.
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 01:57 PM   #5
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 611
I have about a half dozen or so Pyrex (clear) and Corning (opaque white) glass casseroles. The Corning ones have clear Pyrex lids, and the Pyrex ones have tight sealing polypropylene lids so it is a no brainer to cool, cover, and refrigerate the leftover lasagna or casserole.

I have had them all for decades without a single issue.
WhateverYouWant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 02:04 PM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 48,420
Glass cookware/bakeware are
standard kitchen staples. Use them according to directions and you won’t have a problem.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 02:27 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: oregon
Posts: 578
I have a few Pyrex "pans". However, I rarely use them. They make me nervous.

Just the memory of chicken cacciatori (sp.) all over the kitchen from an exploded Pyrex many years ago makes me not trust them.

My wife uses them, so she will get to clean sauce off the walls if it ever happens again.

I wouldn't do a glass pot rice cooker. But that's just me. I tend to bang things around in the kitchen.
Vinylhanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2021, 04:25 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,735
As much as I would trust the glass insofar as the actual cooking is concerned - I don't think I would like having to haul it out.

Sounds awkward. But all this is without having seen the product. You have to judge for yourself Kenny.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 05:23 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Far East
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
As much as I would trust the glass insofar as the actual cooking is concerned - I don't think I would like having to haul it out.

Sounds awkward. But all this is without having seen the product. You have to judge for yourself Kenny.
It's hard to judge because in my city there is little regulation or restriction on many products so it really depends on the brand but the brand isn't very reputable so I can only come down to science. I am currently using an aluminium pot without any coating but the rice cooker itself is failing it was bought 20 years ago and now I'm not able to find out rice cookers with pot without coating
kenny1999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 05:38 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,735
several questions

Do you think the pot from your old rice cooker would fit into a new one?

Are your rice cookers fairly inexpensive? (meaning, if you get 2 years use out of it and just then buy a new one should/when it fails)

May I assume you use them several times a week?

Why do you not want a coating? (teflon is not dangerous unless heated without any food past a really high temperature) (It shouldn't chip off unless you use metal utensils.)

Does the glass insert have a substantial edge around the rim? (meaning can you get a good grip on it to remove from cooker)
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 06:39 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Far East
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Do you think the pot from your old rice cooker would fit into a new one?

Are your rice cookers fairly inexpensive? (meaning, if you get 2 years use out of it and just then buy a new one should/when it fails)

May I assume you use them several times a week?

Why do you not want a coating? (teflon is not dangerous unless heated without any food past a really high temperature) (It shouldn't chip off unless you use metal utensils.)

Does the glass insert have a substantial edge around the rim? (meaning can you get a good grip on it to remove from cooker)

I think you might have little experience with rice cooker because in most cases different models come with their own pot so there isn't a pot that
is generic for many models, at least from my knowledge.

There is time people will forget and hit on the Start button without food, there is time people will forget and use non-metal utensils, it doesn't often happen, but once it happens, I think I'll throw away the pot and have to spend more money, so I don't have anything nonstick in my kitchen
kenny1999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 07:29 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,735
You're absolutely right - I have limited knowledge of rice cookers. And yes, I would be surprised if the old one fit the new but maybe a chance.

I hear you on the teflon but knowing certainly helps. I have several with but most do not. I just try to be careful with them so, although not electric, should they become damaged I just throw them out or repurpose them for other than cooking. For the price I pay (cheap!) and they last 2 or even 3 years I think it's good value. I have several that are going on 7 years.

So why don't you try the glass one. But there too, you will have to remember that glass can suffer thermal shock from hot to cold and vice versa. So the same applies - don't hit the Start button with no food.

Let us know your decision!
So speaking of rice - do you make your rice with different flavours? I guess regular white is your mainstay, but do you ever fancy them up with anything to go along with something special?
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 08:47 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 13,506
Is glass good for cooking?

Jeez, just buy the darn rice cooker and get done with it!
So what if the coating gets scratched? I’m sure there are billions of rice cookers with scratched Teflon coatings in use today. My 5 year old Zojirushi rice cooker has dozens of scratches and gouges and still performs as good as new.

Next question
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 10:52 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Far East
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
You're absolutely right - I have limited knowledge of rice cookers. And yes, I would be surprised if the old one fit the new but maybe a chance.

I hear you on the teflon but knowing certainly helps. I have several with but most do not. I just try to be careful with them so, although not electric, should they become damaged I just throw them out or repurpose them for other than cooking. For the price I pay (cheap!) and they last 2 or even 3 years I think it's good value. I have several that are going on 7 years.

So why don't you try the glass one. But there too, you will have to remember that glass can suffer thermal shock from hot to cold and vice versa. So the same applies - don't hit the Start button with no food.

Let us know your decision!
So speaking of rice - do you make your rice with different flavours? I guess regular white is your mainstay, but do you ever fancy them up with anything to go along with something special?
I am not so worried about nonstick thing getting damaged and spending more money for it.

However, I have little experience with nonstick and I think, I am not sure though, if chances are the peeling off of the coating into the food from the nonstick but it is in small amount and you don't immediately notice the small damage and keep eating eating and eating. I don't know if I am over worried but well, I don't know, I don't know many of my neighbors here who are using nonstick thing, and my elders always tell me not to use nonstick, I don't know if we are too careful or overreacting
kenny1999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2021, 11:12 AM   #15
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 2,258
Great thing about glass cookware is that it is so easy to clean. Just drop it, piping hot into a sinkful of cold water.

Just kidding of course!!!

But the possibility of household members or visitors who wouldn't get that joke ever "helping out" in the kitchen is the strongest argument against glass cookware.
__________________
Calories count but their source counts too. Don't count calories; make every calorie count.
Dr. Chan Tat Hon (paraphrased)
skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2021, 04:43 PM   #16
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 11,671
Glass Cookware;

Borosilicate - What Pyrex used to be made from. Can be used safely over direct flame, in oven, or under broiler without shattering. Widely used for heating substances in the scientific community. Used to be common in the1960's. Corning Visions cookware was borosilicate glass.

Sodium Glass - is a tempered glass that resist breakage from mechanical shock. It is safe when used as directed, and is mechanically stronger than borosilicate glass.. Use on the stovetop, over flame, or under broiler will cause it to shatter. Also, sudden thermal shock, i.e. placing a baking dish straight from the oven onto a wet, room temperature counter-top can cause it to shatter.

Your rice cooker probably uses a sodium glass insert. When removing the hot bowl from the cooker, it needs to be placed onto a wooden, cork, or dry cloth trivet. Do not immerse the hot bowl into water.

Check the label specs. If the bowl is borosilicate, then it will be temperature shock resistant.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2021, 04:51 PM   #17
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 11,671
The attached link is for an uncoated bowl stainless steel rice cooker - https://www.amazon.com/Aroma-Housewa...t=RICE_COOKERS

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2021, 07:09 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Glass Cookware;
......
Check the label specs. If the bowl is borosilicate, then it will be temperature shock resistant.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Please note the word resistant - doesn't mean it still can't shatter.

As to flecks chipping off and being eaten - articles I've read say they cause no harm and will just pass thru. I think you would notice if the lining were starting to peel. Use of wooden and plastic utensils are always recommended, of course.

Over all - I would grade a cooker on how well it cooks the rice. Uneven cooking, overly dry/burnt, overly mushy/wet is, at least for me, a deal breaker! Then ease of cleaning which includes spattering and spitting all over the counter. A lot of reviews mention the spattering and having to clean the outside of cooker and the counter.

But you will not know if that is what your cooker will do unless you can try it. My first inquiry before purchasing, is just what is in their return policy (if any)

I would think you would have more choice in the larger capacity cookers than small 2 or 3 cup ones. That's sort of what I see on Amazon.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2021, 11:37 AM   #19
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 11,671
I had a chemistry set as a child. it had borosilicate glass test tubes, beakers, pipettes, and so on. i melted Sulphur in those test tubes over the flame of a Bunsen burner with alcohol flame (combine Sulphur and paraffin in a test tube, melt over flame. Makes a potent stink bomb.) I made boiled water in the beakers the same way. Never did any of the Pyrex implements shatter from thermal shock.

Glass is an insulator, and transmits heat slowly. What causes it to shatter is that the surface exposed to heat expands rapidly, while the rest of the glass remains much cooler, and remains unexpanded. As glass has no elasticity, this creates immense shearing forces that cause it to catastrophically fail (shatter). This can happen with cast iron, and for the same reasons.

Borosilicate glass transmits heat throughout its structure much more efficiently than other glass formulations, thus allowing uniform expansion, and contraction rates due to temperature changes, thus making it highly resistant to thermal hock failure.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2021, 12:46 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: NYC
Posts: 138
really old Pyrex is fine. the newer pyrex will shatter with great drama if it's hot and wet. guess how i found that out.

i threw all of ours out then.
HeyItsSara is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cook, cooking

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.