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Old 11-05-2009, 09:14 AM   #1
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ISO advice on All-clad stock pots

I am thinking about buying an 8 qt stock pot for making stock. I notice they have their regular one which is wider than it is tall, and a new one which is taller than it is wide, and also more expensive. Any stock makers out there who can advise me whether one would be better than the other?
Thanks!

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Old 11-05-2009, 09:18 AM   #2
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Stockpots are traditionally taller than they are wide.

A pot that is wider than it is tall is usually called a saucepan.

If you want a stockpot for actually making stock, I would recommend a larger size. I use a 20 quart pot.

Also, you don't need to spend the money for an All-Clad pot, though they are great stuff.
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Old 11-05-2009, 12:26 PM   #3
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Actually, pot that is wider than it is tall, can be a Dutch oven. A saucepan has one longish handle, whereas a stockpot and Dutch oven have 2 little handles on the side.
Anyway- thanks. I've been wondering what size to get. There are only 2 1/2 people in our family- my 93 year old mother lives with us and does not eat a lot unless it is desert. I hate freezer burnt food so thought an 8 qt size would be enough. 20 quarts sounds like a lot! How many do you cook for?
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Old 11-05-2009, 12:43 PM   #4
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Stockpots are taller to reduce the surface area and thereby reduce evaporation. Saucepans, Dutch ovens, sauce pots, regardless of the number of handles or what you call them, are typically wider to accommodate foods and allow for evaporation to concentrate flavors. There are exceptions to this naming convention with some brands.

When making stock, a lot of pot volume is taken up with the bones. As a result, you need a lot of space to end up with enough stock so you don't have to make it frequently. I make a large batch of stock, reduce it some, and freeze it in quart-sized Ziplock freezer bags for later use. Freezer burn is not an issue. I cook for two.
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Old 11-06-2009, 07:55 AM   #5
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About how many quarts of stock do you end up with?
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julesthegolfer View Post
About how many quarts of stock do you end up with?
If memory serves, about 6. I use a 20-quart pot and fill it with chicken bones, some mire poix components and spices. Then I cover with water and bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and let it go for 3-4 hours.

When I strain out all the solids and return the liquid to the pot, it's less than half full. I reduce that down to concentrate the flavors, cool it and bag it.
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:15 AM   #7
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All-clad is without a doubt a fantastic product, but it isn't really necessary to spend hundreds of dollars on a stock pot, there really is no need to have a tall stockpot "clad" all the way up the sides.

I bought a 12 qt last year from sears, it is a Kenmore brand. It has a nice heavy encapsulated bottom and matches the rest of my stainless cookware quite well, and I only paid around $50 for it. I think that Cuisinart makes a similar one in the same price range.
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:31 AM   #8
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Thanks everyone for your inputs. I am definitely rethinking the size of pot to get. The (expensive) All-Clad stock pot is to be my Christmas present from my husband, so price is no object. LOL But I may rethink too.
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Old 11-06-2009, 08:45 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
All-clad is without a doubt a fantastic product, but it isn't really necessary to spend hundreds of dollars on a stock pot, there really is no need to have a tall stockpot "clad" all the way up the sides.
I could not agree with this more. Don't waste your money on a clad stockpot, even if it is a gift from your husband. Have him buy you a much less expensive (but just as good) stockpot and spend the extra money on another clad pot or pan where it would make sense. Or use that extra money to buy things to put in the pot.
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:03 AM   #10
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You all have convinced me! I just went to a restaurant supply site and there are a lot of 20 qt stock pots in all price ranges. I have read comments from people who bought cheap stock pots that the meat/veggies burn on the bottom and they are hard to clean. Life is too complicated!! LOL
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:09 AM   #11
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When making stock the heat is not super high so burning should not be a big issue. Also, if you put the bones in first and everything else on top then only the bones are touching the bottom so nothing that is in contact down there should burn.
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:13 AM   #12
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True Confessions time.

A number of years ago, I saw a set of 4 stainless steel stock pots in the supermarket. There were 8-, 12-, 16-, and 20-quart stockpots with lids. I couldn't resist the price so I bought them all for a total of $20.00!

The metal was very thin. I use one to brine turkeys. I use the 20-qt. for stock and that's about it. I have made countless batches of chicken stock with no issues.

If you add the veggies to the pot last, they never reach the bottom and won't burn. They aren't much good except when full of liquid but they work great for stock and brining.

My point is to reinforce what GB said. Buy a SS pot with a disk on the bottom and save your money for other stuff. Like buying us all gifts
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Old 11-06-2009, 09:29 AM   #13
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We're a family of two and have an 18 quart. We find it quite useful for tasks like cooking crabs and making large batches of minestrone when the veggies are in season. Would like to have a 20 quart but the 18 quart is about the largest that fits comfortably on the stove and in the sink.
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Old 11-06-2009, 06:20 PM   #14
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I would guess 12 qt is a good all round size. I would prefer a disc/encapsulated bottom on good stainless to raw aluminum if buying in a restaurant store.
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Old 11-15-2009, 09:01 AM   #15
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hi, i'm new here.
my current stock pot is 20 qt stainless.
i get about a gallon or so of stock with it
i just did a carcass of a 25# turkey in it, and i want a larger stock pot.
we are just two people but there is nothing like your own homemade stock
i freeze and can it as well
i do a lot of big batch cooking and during canning season my stock pot doubles as a boiling water bath canner while my pressure canners are all in use

as long as it fits on the stove, and you can comfortably see into it, and ladle out of it, bigger (IMOP) is definitely better

vi
(who is got some gift certificates to spend on cookware, and a new larger stock pot is on the list)
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