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Old 02-03-2015, 06:00 PM   #1
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Please help me find a use for this cooking pan.

At the bottom of my kitchen drawer I found a shiny tin, made-in-France, old cooking dish which I believe is called a QUICHE or TART MOULD with a removable bottom - a flat, thin disk.

This cooking dish has large flutes and flares outwards. That is, at the top it is 8" and at the bottom it is 6.5 inches. This pan is about 2" deep.

I've never used it before, so I tried to make a standard-issue vegetable & egg quiche. The pastry crust stayed stuck to the top of the flutes and I had to carefully carve it out.

Same thing happened with an ordinary cake that I made. I buttered the bottom and sides and sprinkled bread crumbs. The cake rose slightly over level.

Can someone advise, please? What are you supposed to bake in these things so that they'll come out easily? Many thanks. Obviously, I don't know what these things were designed for...

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Old 02-03-2015, 06:04 PM   #2
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Sounds like a tart pan
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:12 PM   #3
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So, what is meant by a "tart"? Can you be specific, please. I'm not much of a baker. (I know what "tarts" are...)
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:45 PM   #4
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A tart is a pastry that usually uses a short crust and is filled. Commonly filled with fruit and pastry cream or a custard of some sort.
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Old 02-03-2015, 06:47 PM   #5
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:10 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
So, what is meant by a "tart"? Can you be specific, please. I'm not much of a baker. (I know what "tarts" are...)
Try Google:
https://www.google.com/search?q=tart...ed=0CAYQ_AUoAQ
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:46 PM   #7
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If the pan is clean a pie crust should come out without any preparation to the pan. Some people remove them from the pan by setting the finished tart on a 28 ounce can and gently easing the ring down off the tart, the tart itself is supported by the metal disc.

If I was baking a cake in it I would grease and flour the pan or use a Joy of Baking type spray that contains a mixture of fat and flour. Again the pan must me very clean. I often see these older pans at estate sales, many of them have baked on "crud" or little rust spots that can make it difficult to remove the ring.

Take a look.

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Old 02-03-2015, 07:53 PM   #8
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Wow, that's a terrific method. Why didn't I think of that??? By the way, my tart pan is like new. For some reason it has been in my drawer for ages, unused.

Steve: I looked at that blueberry tart on wikipedia and I see that maybe my crust was too high and got stuck along the edge. Also, my tart pan is not your common shallow kind. It is flared outwards and quite deep - 2". I wonder if that is a factor or not.

Thank you very much indeed for all your input, all of you.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:23 AM   #9
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I live in France, Have one of the beggers, use it quite often for quiches and sweet tarts and we ( it and me) have a love-hate relationship. It never sticks when I make something unimportant on a wet Wednesday night for instance , but the time I use it for us +guests it gets nasty and sticks like hell. I won't let it come out to play anymore for dinner parties, it's just too rude. The method advised above though does work best. Good luck, give it a smack from me
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:04 AM   #10
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Love you to bits, menumaker! You made my day. It isn't just me, then...

But I looked on youtube for cooks extracting their quiches from their fluted pans and it seems to work.

While I'm here: Even though the pastry has tons of butter, the cooks on youtube apply butter to the bottom & sides of the tart pan before placing the crust in. What do you think of that.

Also, do you have the standard kind of tart cooking dish or the deep kind with large flutes like I do?
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:54 AM   #11
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I've never tried buttering the tin as well myself so I can't say but to your other query, I do have the kind of fluted tin you have and other sorts besides in different sizes. My metal ring one that goes straight onto a baking sheet is good if I am blind baking. I can lift it off quite easily but it is only for 4-6 portions, quite small.
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Old 02-09-2015, 06:55 PM   #12
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A tart is a pastry that usually uses a short crust and is filled. Commonly filled with fruit and pastry cream or a custard of some sort.
Basically, it's an open pie. The tin or dish is lined with pastry - usually shortcrust pastry or, rarely, puff pastry. The filling, which can be sweet or savoury, goes into the pastry case without a covering layer of pastry.

Have a look at these

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ta...AUoAQ&dpr=0.95

(Occasionally a tart can be made on a flat-ish plate and filled with jam but we won't go there now.)
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Old 02-09-2015, 07:18 PM   #13
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Love you to bits, menumaker! You made my day. It isn't just me, then...

But I looked on youtube for cooks extracting their quiches from their fluted pans and it seems to work.

While I'm here: Even though the pastry has tons of butter, the cooks on youtube apply butter to the bottom & sides of the tart pan before placing the crust in. What do you think of that.

Also, do you have the standard kind of tart cooking dish or the deep kind with large flutes like I do?
It isn't usual to grease tins/pans for pastry as the pastry has enough of its own fat to stop anything sticking. Extra grease can make the pastry fry and, if the worst comes to the worst, it may burn.

Do you bake your pastry case "blind"? ie with no filling in it? You might find this works better than putting the filling on top of the raw pastry.

Baking blind means you line the tin with pastry,prick the base with a fork then put a layer of baking parchment in the bottom and cover it with a layer of dried beans or those ceramic beads sold for the purpose to stop the pastry rising while it's cooking. You bake this until it's almost done then carefully remove the paper and beans and put the tin with the pastry case in it back into the oven to finish baking. You will find that the pastry has shrunk very slightly away from the sides of the tin. This will make it easier to remove from the tin when the dish is complete. Cool it completely in the tin and then add the filling and put back in the oven to cook the filling.

Hope that helps
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Old 02-09-2015, 09:47 PM   #14
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Check out my Cheese and Tomato Tart. Everyone who tried it, loved it. I ended up having to make a second one. The picture is the real thing, not clip art.
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Old 02-10-2015, 02:10 AM   #15
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Check out my Cheese and Tomato Tart. Everyone who tried it, loved it. I ended up having to make a second one. The picture is the real thing, not clip art.
That tart looks delicious. And it is doable in the home kitchen. The ingredients are every day ones that you would purchase at least once a month. You don't have to use the Amoretti products. You can purchase the olive oil that is a little pricier along with the olives that can be purchased at the deli and still have quality products.

Did you make that for the Amoretti Company?
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Old 02-10-2015, 04:33 AM   #16
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Oh MC,
You temptress you! Plate made Jam tart, treacle tart, trimmings twisted on the top and Birds custard of course. These of my childhood ( and your's I suspect) so Yes, let's go there, you and me down memory lane at least.
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:27 AM   #17
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Do you bake your pastry case "blind"? ie with no filling in it? You might find this works better than putting the filling on top of the raw pastry.

I just follow the instructions on the recipe, and usually they recommend to blind bake. Am not a highly experienced baker, but the other day I thought I'd try again to make a tart. However, the pastry portion of the recipe called for:

1 C. of flour and only 1/4 cup of butter.

Even I know that sounds goofy but I did it anyway. We could not eat the result, we just scraped the filling out...feh.

Any comments, anyone? I'm enjoying this discussion thoroughly and getting lots of good advice here.
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:09 PM   #18
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Oh MC,
You temptress you! Plate made Jam tart, treacle tart, trimmings twisted on the top and Birds custard of course. These of my childhood ( and your's I suspect) so Yes, let's go there, you and me down memory lane at least.
Very occasionally when no-one's looking I make myself one and, yes, it has to have Birds custard Nothing else is quite the same.
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:51 PM   #19
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Did you make that for the Amoretti Company?
Yes, I am a consultant for Amoretti, and that is what I do. I provide product descriptions and create recipes using their products for publication on their web pages. Of course, I am required to prepare the recipes I create to make sure they are both feasible and delicious.
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:00 PM   #20
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Mad Cook: "(Occasionally a tart can be made on a flat-ish plate and filled with jam but we won't go there now.)"

Er...how long does "now" last?

Can you direct me to recipes for such a tart as you describe above? I have lots o' home-made jam that I am looking to use for...a tart.

Gracias.
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