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Old 02-05-2020, 04:26 PM   #1
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Seasoning new wok

What is the best oil to use for seasoning a new wok?

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Old 02-05-2020, 04:33 PM   #2
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I'm pretty sure you will get a variety of answers - here's mine:
Outside on a hot campstove, using coconut oil.

Clean the wok in hot soapy water and dry. Heat it (dry) until it changes color. Wipe down with coconut oil and heat it past the smoke point until oil blackens. Recoat and repeat.
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:45 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
I'm pretty sure you will get a variety of answers - here's mine:
Outside on a hot campstove, using coconut oil.

Clean the wok in hot soapy water and dry. Heat it (dry) until it changes color. Wipe down with coconut oil and heat it past the smoke point until oil blackens. Recoat and repeat.
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I understand the process, but this wok is carbon steel so I know it isn't near as porus as cast iron. Just looking for oil suggestions. I figured you would want as high of smoke point as possible.
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvang View Post
I understand the process, but this wok is carbon steel so I know it isn't near as porus as cast iron. Just looking for oil suggestions. I figured you would want as high of smoke point as possible.
I have woks made by Yamada - they are carbon steel and this is the process I used.
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Old 02-05-2020, 05:11 PM   #5
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I miss read this "Seasoning New York".
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Old 02-05-2020, 06:30 PM   #6
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Everyone has a favorite oil. I believe any high temp oil will work. I used corn oil as it is high temp and cheap to season three cast iron skillets and a carbon steel wok. Never had a seasoning issue.
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Old 02-27-2020, 12:51 AM   #7
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Is pre-seasoned carbon steel wok also need to season before first use?
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Old 02-27-2020, 03:31 AM   #8
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Of the new Wok's I've seasoned I used Peanut Oil. But only after going to the
auto parts store and buying some 600 grit sandpaper to go over all the surfaces of the Wok first. Then the Wok is washed and dried well.

This leaves micro groves on the surface that the oil can collect in before putting it in a hot oven. Several applications of the oil is wiped on between each heating cycle in the oven. I've even been cautioned by some Chinese people I know to closely examine a new Wok to see if it has some clear coating on it as a rust inhibitor. If so it needs to be removed first using solvents.

That's how I season a new Wok before using it.
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Old 02-27-2020, 04:12 AM   #9
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The fat, be it lard, corn oil, peanut oil, sonflower oil, or whatever, goes beyond the smole point and becomes first like a thin tar, then turns to a solid carbon coating that completely seperates the raw metal from whatever food item is placed in it. This coating also seals against oxygen and prevents corrosion. I have seasoned my cast iron pans, and carbon steel wok with everything from pork fat, to coconut oil. I really don't see much difference when the metal is completely seasoned. Just remember the reason for the seasoning, to seal the cooking surface, that is, act as a barrier to keep food from touching the metal. And just for grins, bare aluminim should be seasoned like steel, or cast iron. It then takes on many of the same properties, but is lighter weight, with fewer hot spots. I don't really know if one oil turns into a more durable coating than another.
The great thing is that if you don't get the results you want with one fat, scrub the pan clean with soap and a stainless steel scrubby pad and reseason with a different oil.

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