"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2011, 05:52 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 27
Seasoning - Right or Wrong?

Hi All,

I recently bought a de Buyer carbone plus steel pan. This is my first pan that requires seasoning. Ive followed the instructions and cooked a few things in it. Its developed a black circle in the middle of the pan. Is this part of seasoning? Or is this something which should be scrubbed off?

Photo:
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/9669/frypan2.jpg

Thanks!

__________________

TheAlfheim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2011, 09:07 PM   #2
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 37
Never scrub seasoned pans it'll remove the coating that was on it. Just use a sponge and wipe it off.

Black circle is normal its like using a wok and burning it so it gets black in the centre
__________________

binny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 09:09 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 27
Hi Binny,

Thanks for the feedback. I was a little concerned that there's just this black spot in the middle - I would've thought it would season more evenly (or, I could season it more evenly).

Ive since taken a better quality photo:
http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/1281/img59752small.jpg

If anyone else can chime in, I'd appreciate it

Thanks!
TheAlfheim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 09:15 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
Joshatdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Anacortes, WA
Posts: 369
Send a message via ICQ to Joshatdot Send a message via AIM to Joshatdot Send a message via MSN to Joshatdot Send a message via Yahoo to Joshatdot Send a message via Skype™ to Joshatdot
Quote:
Seasoning: preparing your frying pan
Clean the frying pan with very hot water and wipe it. Pour one centimeter of oil in the pan and heat it for 5 minutes. Next, thrown away the oil and wipe your pan with paper towels.

The more the pan is used, the better the performance. The darker it becomes the better it is for natural nonstick properties.
To me sounds a bit confusing on what the one centimeter of oil means. do you pour on 1 cm thick of oil in the whole pan .. or just a 1cm dot?

I know from seasoning CI pans you give it a through thin coat of shortening all over. Maybe with this pan you just use a 1cm dot and spread that all around the inside of the pan.
Joshatdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 09:21 PM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
1cm means 1cm thick, not just a little dot.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 10:47 PM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,094
GB's right. The seasoning will only happen where the oil is. It's the oil that changes chemical composition and creates that black layer that becomes non-stick properties. So just do it again.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 10:55 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 27
Hi...

When I seasoned the pan, I ensured it had a full coat on the base with vegetable oil. Could it be that I had the heat on my electric cook-top on high, so it created a hot-spot in the middle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
So just do it again.
Do I need to scrub back the pan? Or just put 1cm of oil in and heat it up?

Thanks!
TheAlfheim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2011, 11:02 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,094
I'd start with just adding more oil. The spot in the center of the pan doesn't look as though it's thick enough to be noticeable. Use a burner that's as big as or bigger than the pan bottom and let it get fully hot before putting the pan on it.. After reseasoning if there is still a problem, go down to shiny metal and start over.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2011, 01:01 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,986
If your pan has an oven safe handle, you can effectively season it by rubbing all over with a thin coating of shortening. place a cookie sheet under you pan to catch any drips. Now, place the pan into a 350 degree F. oven for a half hour or so. Turn off the oven and let everything cool. Remove the pan and rub s thin layer of oil onto the cooking surface and inner sides. Your pan should be ready to go.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 09:04 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 27
Hi All,

Ive enjoyed the use of my pan, but I wonder if in my learning curve, have I killed the pan? Is there a way to bring this pan back to usefulness?

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/9236/photo1wf.jpg

Thanks,
Andrew
TheAlfheim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2011, 09:33 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,998
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAlfheim
Hi All,

Ive enjoyed the use of my pan, but I wonder if in my learning curve, have I killed the pan? Is there a way to bring this pan back to usefulness?

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/9236/photo1wf.jpg

Thanks,
Andrew
What kind of pan is it? If it's nonstick or teflon, it's trash. If it's SS, I've had success boiling a mix of baking soda and vinegar. Elbow grease and Barkeeper's Friend might help too.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 01:46 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Somebunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 2,535
Looks like it could be anodized steel. I think it could be scoured if it is.
__________________
If you don't like the food, have more wine!
Somebunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2011, 07:04 AM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 27
Hi all...

The pan is a de Buyer carbon steel pan.

-Andrew
TheAlfheim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2011, 02:51 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebunny View Post
Looks like it could be anodized steel. I think it could be scoured if it is.
Aluminum is anodized, on the outside only. Steel is galvanized. Both processes make it impossible to cook on those surfaces. Both are used to make the base metal (aluminum or steel), more resistant to corrosion. The anodizing process also hardens aluminum, making it more resistant to dings and scratches. The inside surface of anodized aluminum pans are either left as plain aluminum, or have a non-stick coating applied to them.

The carbon steel pan used by The Alfheim, should be seasoned as a cast-iron pan is seasoned. edible oil or grease of some kind is rubbed all over the pan. Heat is then applied to polymerize the fat, and create a durable, nearly stick free coating that protects the base metal (steel) from corrosion. It also makes a wonderful cooking surface as the patina (that's the baked on fat), becomes stronger and more stick-free as the pan is continuously used.

Though it doesn't seem so to the naked eye, or to the touch, both cast iron and steel are porous metals. When exposed to heat, and food, that porosity causes the food to stick to the metal like crazy. When the fat bakes in (seasons the metal), the pores are filled and the metal coated. This enables the food to slide on the slippery layer of polymerized fat that coats the metal. It also seals the metal from salt, water, and most importantly, oxygen. So the pan doesn't rust, and food doesn't stick.

Sounds like a good plan to me.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
seasoning

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×