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Old 06-05-2021, 12:21 PM   #1
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Special treatment for new cooking pan??

some advertise that special treatment on new pan is needed before its first use, e.g. frying it with a piece of pork fats or vegetables, some advertise that there is no special treatment is needed. Have you heard of these? Is it really necessary to keep the best condition of a new cookware?

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Old 06-05-2021, 12:40 PM   #2
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What kind of pan?
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Old 06-05-2021, 07:32 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
What kind of pan?
Good question.

Some types of pans need to be "seasoned"; others don't.
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Old 06-08-2021, 11:16 AM   #4
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Good question.

Some types of pans need to be "seasoned"; others don't.
stainless steel of 304 or 316 grade, I focus on cookware made of these materials usually.
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Old 06-09-2021, 10:47 AM   #5
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As I've heard you need to season cast iron pans. SS pans I'm not sure but maybe necessary.
In Sri Lankan houses, when a cast iron pan is bought, many people cook some "goraka" brindleberry in it, and then fry eggs in it to season the pan.
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Old 06-09-2021, 01:43 PM   #6
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I don't have any steel pans but I believe you do season them very similar to CI.

Several members have and do and have posted how they personally do it.
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Old 06-09-2021, 02:24 PM   #7
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Carbon steel pans are the material that need to be seasoned in a way similar to cast iron. Stainless steel do not. I've been working on developing a nice patona on my carbon steel wok (note to self: do more stir-fry), but when I cook with a stainless steel pan I often polish the interior by scrubbing with a soapy steel wool pad like Brillo.
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Old 06-10-2021, 08:45 PM   #8
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Carbon steel pans are the material that need to be seasoned in a way similar to cast iron. Stainless steel do not. I've been working on developing a nice patona on my carbon steel wok (note to self: do more stir-fry), but when I cook with a stainless steel pan I often polish the interior by scrubbing with a soapy steel wool pad like Brillo.
This! ^^^^^

Stainless steel just needs to be washed first with soap and water to remove manufacturing "stuff." Then it is ready to cook.

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Old 06-10-2021, 09:57 PM   #9
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Yeah, sorry, I should have distinguished between Stainless Steel and Carbon Steel. I only have Stainless not Carbon.

I was going to buy a small pan once until the cheapest one I could find was $65 or $75 for the one 8" pan. Gulp, decided I had enough toys that day.... but then I bought an FP for almost 5 X the price of the pan...





but I love it...
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Old 06-11-2021, 12:17 AM   #10
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Cast iron, high carbon steel woks, mineral steel (high carbon steel frhing pans), blue steel, raw aluminum, these need to be seasoned. It prevents corrosion, and isolates the food from the metal. it also makes the pans virtually non-stick. Even my wok can be used to fry an egg, without it sticking. I just heat it, rub a little butter, or oil on the bottom, and it's good to go.

If you mess up the seasoning, you simply was it in hot, soapy water, taking care to get it very clean, then re-season the pan.

Ceramic coated pans are the new craze.. They work beautifully the first few times you use the, but soon after, food sticks to them. Teflon works, but is so easy to ruin by improper handling, scratching, or cooking with high temperatures.

Stainless steel, depending on the pan quality, and technique, can be stck free as we;;, without any seasoning. Look for tiny, circular sanding grooves before purchasing SS. They will cause food to stick. The inner surface needs to ne mirror smooth. When cooking, heat the clean SS pan with nothing in it, no oil, butter, or anything. When the pan is hot, add your preferred cooking fat, Place the food into the pan. Pancakes, eggs, meats, all slide around on the pan easily, at least in my experience. I use a 10" SS pan for making large crepes, and delicate, French omelets.

Hope this helps.

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Old 06-11-2021, 06:08 AM   #11
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Quote: Chief Longwind: " When cooking, heat the clean SS pan with nothing in it, no oil, butter, or anything. When the pan is hot, add your preferred cooking fat,..."

Absolutely! Many times, in a hurry, added the fat while heating up - that's when you get that horrid brown stain up the side that is nigh on impossible to remove without the use of an industrial grinder.
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