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Old 02-15-2008, 02:05 AM   #1
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Want to Buy new cookware---Questions

Hi all,

Before I landed here I was convinced I was going to purchase the Calphalon One Cook Set (non-stick). Since I discovered this wonderful board I am more confused then ever. I could really use some guidance here. I'm gonna list my wants...LOL and I would appreciate it you could comment on anything related.

1. I need cookware that can be placed in the oven.

2. I have a huge island in my kitchen and was thinking about installing a Pot holder (shoot I have no idea what it's really called) over the island. The island is about 7 feet by 4 feet in length. I would like to have nice cookware to hang.

3. I thought I wanted non-stick cookware, but after reading here, I have no idea anymore.

4. I have a smooth cooktop in my island. So, that may or may not make a difference on what cookware I purchase.

5. And I would like to purchase something that has a good warranty.

Currently I have some revere ware (that is about worn out) some pampered chef pieces, and a couple of Calphalon skillets.

ANy help or ideas you could shed would be greatly appreciated.

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Old 02-15-2008, 06:33 AM   #2
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Eriu, your confusion is understandable. There are a lot of choices.

We are in the cookware section of the forum. These questions and others have been answered before in earlier threads. Take a few minutes to read some of the older threads for a load of great information.

You're fortunate to have a nice island over which to hang your new cookware. You can buy a set or individual pieces to get all you need. A set sometimes comes with items you don't care about so picking individual pieces may be a good idea.

You can choose from anodized aluminum, stainless steel, copper and cast iron. It may not be a bad idea to have some of each.

I hope your reading will answer your questions.
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Old 02-15-2008, 04:29 PM   #3
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Hello Eriu,

I have pieces by Baumalu (Copper lined with tin), Falk Culinaire & Mauviel (Cooper, Stainless Steel inner), Cast Iron (Lodge) and enameled Cast Iron (Chefmate and Le Creuset), clay (Emile Henry) plus some Macy's Tools of the trade (Stainless steel w/bottom encapsulated cooper). I recommend all of them, please note that none of these pieces is perfectly good for everything. Let me know if you need more info.

Some forum members posted good comments about Cotsco Clad cookware (SS plus Al) made by Tramontina, I can't remember the brand.
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Old 02-15-2008, 04:50 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Eriu View Post
Before I landed here I was convinced I was going to purchase the Calphalon One Cook Set (non-stick). Since I discovered this wonderful board I am more confused then ever.
Start buy purchasing one of the "try me" pieces instead of a whole set and see what you like or don't like about it.
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:09 PM   #5
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I always like SS with copper bottom for hanging on a rack as well as iron skillets as they can go from cooktop straight to oven. I don't have anything non stick anymore for pots and pans, just for bake ware along with glass bake ware.
I agree that it is good to have a selection from each, as well as to pick out what you want instead of buying the sets. You save money on the sets, but if you end up not liking it or using, then it isn't much of a savings in the end.
As previously suggested, try one or two pieces first and see what preforms best for you and what you like then start buying more of that.
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriu View Post
Currently I have some revere ware (that is about worn out)
First, I can't imagine Revere Ware wearing out. I still have (and constantly use) many of the Revere Ware pieces I started cooking with nearly 50 years ago.

As for the rest, definitely pick and choose. I have never purchased a "set" of cookware. I have "pet" pans I use constantly and specialty pans, too.

It's always good to be sure you have oven-ready pans. Just don't forget to protect the hot handles from your hands so you don't get burned. It's easy to forget that the whole pan has been in the oven.

You will have special issues to watch because you have a smooth cooktop. That's been addressed somewhere here at DC, too.

I highly recommend purchasing some cast-iron cookware. I couldn't live without mine. I don't mean the enamel-coated kind. The old-fashioned kind that has to be seasoned.

Good luck with your quest. And, don't be naive, you will always be searching for cookware. It's an addiction.
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Old 02-17-2008, 10:05 AM   #7
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For my cooking skill level, and income level, I am content with Calphalon Contempory Non-stick skillets, Calphalon Tri-Ply Stainless pots and Lodge cast iron. All of which work fine on my smooth-top electric range.
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Old 02-17-2008, 10:28 AM   #8
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I totally agree with having a mixture of cookware. I bought one nice stainless steel set and added pieces to that. I think it's good to have one non-stick skillet. I have a small one but I always end up using my old cast iron to cook bacon and eggs on. I also have a small enameled cast iron dutch oven and I love it! I also have an enameled cast iron (le creuset) sauce pan that gets alot of use. It seems like if you cook a variety of dishes you need a variety of pans because each pan cooks certain things better. I would recommend starting out with a good stainless set and building from there though. I bought the stainless new but alot of the other pieces you can find second hand like any of the cast iron peices. That is a great way of getting started. I found all of my cast iron pieces second hand. They didn't cost me much but they will last a lifetime.
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
First, I can't imagine Revere Ware wearing out. I still have (and constantly use) many of the Revere Ware pieces I started cooking with nearly 50 years ago.

As for the rest, definitely pick and choose. I have never purchased a "set" of cookware. I have "pet" pans I use constantly and specialty pans, too.

It's always good to be sure you have oven-ready pans. Just don't forget to protect the hot handles from your hands so you don't get burned. It's easy to forget that the whole pan has been in the oven.

You will have special issues to watch because you have a smooth cooktop. That's been addressed somewhere here at DC, too.

I highly recommend purchasing some cast-iron cookware. I couldn't live without mine. I don't mean the enamel-coated kind. The old-fashioyonned kind that has to be seasoned.

Good luck with your quest. And, don't be naive, you will always be searching for cookware. It's an addiction.


Oh yes, Revere cookware can wear out.

I had a Revere set that had started to pit. Small holes had developed on the sides of some of the pots, rendering them useless.

I had no choice but to throw them away.

Like some things in today's world, that cookware was never up to parr.
I thought that it was the best cookware back then in the late '70s.

But as time passed on, I began to realise that that cookware was flimsily made and had absolutely no protecion on the bottoms against extreme heat,
so I had to very carefully babysit with the pots to make sure that the food
being cooked in them didn't stick or burn.

Now, the last time that I saw ANY of that cookware was in the local supermarket. That right there should tell anyone who might be thinking about buying this cookware, that it's integrity and popularity has gone south.
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:30 AM   #10
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We have Revere ware as well, great stuff never had any of the problems you speak of here. Never felt the need to babysit them, and there is plenty of protection on the bottom against extreme heat. The set is about 6 years old, has been used extensively, and still looks and functions like brand new.
I have never seen it in our local supermarket, or any of the local supermarkets around here, it's not where we got ours either.
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:12 PM   #11
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I would recommend starting out with a good stainless set and building from there though.
A set would be great if you needed all of the pieces.
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Old 02-17-2008, 01:03 PM   #12
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I think that you might have a much better upgraded set.

The one that I had was like the one that was introduced in the '50s.
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:23 PM   #13
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First, I can't imagine Revere Ware wearing out. I still have (and constantly use) many of the Revere Ware pieces I started cooking with nearly 50 years ago.
That's funny 'cause I have a couple of my Mothers pans which she started out just a little bit longer than 50 years ago.

When Wife and I married I had to stop her from trying to keep the bottoms shiny, that and sliding them over the cook top is probably how Revere Ware gets 'worn out'.

I agree with the mixture of cookware. I could list the stuff in my kitchen but at one part of the list folks would be thinking ;poor fella, can't afford better' but in other parts of the list others would be thinking 'pretentious braggart'.

I prefer non coated Iron, I got plenty of it. I also have plane stainless, copper and aluminum clad stainless, bare stainless, everything form no name to 'the' name to names I never heard of.

They all work well (or better) or they wouldn't be here. Except for the pieces that were gifts or hand me downs (very few) Wife and I got it all for dimes on the dollar.

I'm a "mechanic" and a tool freak, pots and pans are tools. Not even Snap-On makes the best tool(s) for every task, so don't look for any one manufacturer to fill every need in your cookware.
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Old 02-20-2008, 01:38 PM   #14
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I have lots of different types myself, and not all of it is what I sell. I have Revere from maybe 15 years ago and it is not the same quality as that my MIL had 50 years ago. Now that stuff was made well!

I agree with testing try me pieces in both non-stick and stainless. I think you will have trouble with non-enameled cast iron on your smooth top range ...you need to be looking for smooth bottoms. Tramontina (sp?) has an affordable offering of enamel coated cast iron to try -- I think I recently saw a dutch oven for around $75. If you find that you like that style for certain things like deep frying, braising, etc., then you can consider Le Creuset or the like, which is considerably more of an investment. There are lots of good choices out there in every price range. I wouldn't be without my non-stick skillets for some things, my stainless for others. And we use a grill pan nearly every day, so don't discount that piece as superfluous; it's great for everything from bacon to panini, burgers, steaks and fish filets.

Look for an unconditional warranty where you can return for a full refund if it does not perform to your expectations. Believe it or not, they're out there and I would be the first to take advantage of it. There are also ways to save anywhere from 20 to 50 percent, even in a brick & mortar store. Take your time.

Please let us know what you decide on, even if it's an eclectic mix. That's half the fun!
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Old 02-20-2008, 03:08 PM   #15
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When Wife and I married I had to stop her from trying to keep the bottoms shiny, that and sliding them over the cook top is probably how Revere Ware gets 'worn out'.
I never even thought of that. We have one pot we use only for popping popcorn in on the stove top, and that requires you slide it around a lot on the cook top. I checked the bottom and yes it is wearing it out!
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Old 02-20-2008, 03:11 PM   #16
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I think that you might have a much better upgraded set.

The one that I had was like the one that was introduced in the '50s.
DW got them free as they were given to World Kitchen when she worked there, a distributor of kitchen ware. There is the chance, because they are samples meant to entice them into carrying their line, that they are better made than the commercial ones.
One theory she proposed is that they were made at the testing and proving factory in, I believe, TN. But once it hits production, it is made in a factory in China that doesn't necessarily have the same quality standards.
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Old 02-24-2008, 01:33 PM   #17
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Thanks to all of you for the wonderful advice. For some reason I had it my brain that I just had to buy a set. I'm going to do as you all suggested which make a lot more sense. I'm going to buy a couple of different pieces to try out first.

I love it too that we will always be buying cookware...you are so right.

And, one of my pieces of revere ware actually split horizontally at the bottom of the pan. It was old and probably the piece I used the most. I think I will replace that one first.

Thanks again to all of you. I am really enjoying this site.

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Old 02-24-2008, 01:51 PM   #18
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Old 02-24-2008, 02:31 PM   #19
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I never even thought of that. We have one pot we use only for popping popcorn in on the stove top, and that requires you slide it around a lot on the cook top. I checked the bottom and yes it is wearing it out!

I didn't say a word to Wife .....

I'm on the idiot box when I hear a pan lid start rattling.

I figure Wife is putting stuff away but the rattling goes on, and on, and on.

I go see what she's up to and be darned, Wifes making popcorn on the stove.

First time I've had popcorn made that way in decades. I forgot how good it is.
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Old 02-26-2008, 11:10 AM   #20
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Question A little bit of this, a little bit of that ...

The last 2 pieces of our Revere-ware are on their last legs, the pasta pot handles are really oxidizing these days.

If you want non-stick & you have to use the dishwasher, only Circulon is touted as truly dishwasher safe, and no I don't/have never owned any. I never really gravitated to it, but I notice more people buying it & checking it out at Macy's.

We have Calphalon non-stick of various vintages (we had a set of what I believe was the 1st commercial grade non-stick). We have a lot of Caphalon ss (practically a full set) & 1 piece of All clad ss.

We also have a 3 piece Mauviel Copper, and we have 5 pieces of Le Creuset. We just don't own a cast iron skillet.

Out of all of that, the non-stick fry pans get used for eggs, the dishwasher has eaten the coating off the back of the 2nd generation nonstick Caphalon frypan, its now Electrosol blue and I don't think that's coming off. Needless to say, we've been handwashing that one lately.

The stainlesses are the workhorses for us, we use it almost everyday and it's dishwasher friendly.

Long winded and I'm sorry, but we started exactly where you are. My view is you can't go with 1 thing, and you may find what you think you like you may not use too much (yea, the expensive Mauviel was my idea )
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