"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-03-2013, 09:05 PM   #21
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,599
Yeah, Santa never brought mine...

S'okay, I do fine with my De Buyer sauté pan, the carbon steel one...works just fine for stir fry.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 09:33 PM   #22
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,670
Well, ya see, you young pups, back just about the time writing was invented, (And no, I didn't invent it. My cousin did.) and just after I invented the axle that made the wheel useful, I had an idea to make this bowl-shaped cooking device to stir-fry foods in. So I got a big piece of granite, and took my hammer and chisel and started chipping away at the problem... Ahahahaha, hohoho, chipping away at the problem, get it? Ahem, you aren't laughing. Something's wrong with your brain.

Anyways, I fashioned this great granite bowl that measured three feet across (I used a yeti foot. They're really big), and 2 foot deep. The granite bowl was three inches thick, and polished as smooth as glass, so as to be non-stick. I'm tellin' ya, it was a real bugger to get onto that wok ring, and make it stay put. That thing was heavy! So, after placing my granite wok onto the ring, and over my roaring fire, I threw in some mastodon meat, diced into half-inch cubes of course. There were a few cans of water chestnuts in the cave, along with some leeks that DW picked back in the swamp. Now I have to say a good word about DW right here. She had to outrun a sabertooth, and a pack of baboons to bring back those leeks. Whata woman.!

Anyways, all was going well. The wild herbs were smelling so good with the mastodon and leeks, and other greens. But alas, I made the fatal error. I added cold cornstarch slurry to my granite wok. The instant that cold liquid it that hot granite, the durned thing exploded. It's a wonder we weren't all killed. The force of that explosion was sufficient to agravate the Earth's crust, and the rocky mountains were formed right before our eyes. But my stir fry was ruined.

So, in reference to this thread, don't use a granite wok. They just don't hold up, though they are great fun to plunk down on BT's head as a winter hat.

I haven't spun a good yarn in a while. That was fun.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 09:42 PM   #23
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post

So, in reference to this thread, don't use a granite wok. They just don't hold up, though they are great fun to plunk down on BT's head as a winter hat.

I haven't spun a good yarn in a while. That was fun.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I think you have brain freeze from those long winters in the northern wasteland.



.40
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 09:47 PM   #24
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,599
Nothing wrong with my brain...was caught trying to adjust my teeth...good yarn Chief!
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 09:03 PM   #25
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Thanks everyone! I'll consider what you all said and buy the wok after some more thought (I'm a cautious buyer).
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 11:02 PM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11,942
I simply use my large cast iron fry pan to do all my chinese cooking and oil frying (I don't really "deep" fry, I just put an inch of oil in my CI pan heat oil and fry till brown turn and brown other side). I sear in it then put in the oven to finish cooking. I put a round rack in a cast iron pan and roast meats in the oven. When meat is cooked I remove the meat and rack and make gravy in the pan drippings. I use cast iron just about everyday and love it.

My SS pots and pans are Cuisinart.
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 11:29 AM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
yogiwan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Reno Nevada
Posts: 47
For most stir fry applications, I personally would probably go with the the Carbon Steel. Stir fry is for high heat quick cooking. The carbon steel has the characteristics that work well for this. Cleaning is easy - a bit of warm water with a dash of soap, rinse, dry and your done. If look in the kitchens of many of the best oriental restaurants what you will find in use are carbon steel or anodized aluminum. While these kitchens need both ease of use and utility, they beat their cookware up such that it also has to be inexpensive.

The carbon steel may not be a pretty and the stainless. So you need to go for what works best in you kitchen and with your style of cooking.

Terry Retter
__________________
yogiwan
yogiwan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 02:44 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,131
A Carbon Steel Wok is what you need. In addition to the fact that you can get it very hot (which is the key to stir frying) it will develop seasoning which will make your Chinese food taste better and better as it gets more seasoned.

Dont stir fry in a nonstick pan. There's no need for it (you are constantly stirring so food wont stick anyway) and you cant get them hot enough.

Electric woks usually dont get hot enough either.

I bought mine from The Wok Shop in San Francisco years ago on a business trip and its still going strong. They do mail order.

http://www.wokshop.com/
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 10:33 AM   #29
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,820
Another vote for a big cast iron skillet--I use a deep chicken fryer on my gas stove, and can get a good sizzle going.

One caveat for cast iron--when the food is done, you have to dump it into a bowl--if you leave it in the cast iron, it continues to cook and will get mushy.

I don't think I have room in my kitchen for another pan, or I might consider a carbon steel wok.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 02:11 AM   #30
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 08:35 AM   #31
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,670
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
Once seasoned, you can use your wok to cook anything you wish, on top of the stove. I've boiled pasta noodles, made popcorn, made pasta sauce, made soups, deep fried, stir fried, and even braised in mine. I like wooden handles as metal ones, though more durable, can get hot. Also, I can't use mine in the oven because of the wooden handles.

Remember, a wok isn't magic. It's simply a cooking vessel made of metal. It's unique shape makes it handy for cooking some types of foods, better than say, a soup pot, or griddle. It works by transfering heat into food by the same laws of physics that all cooking vessels use. It is a very versatile cooking vessel.

I love to use mine as it's a very large wok, for a home kitchen. It also has a flat bottom, which makes it more useful than round bottom woks, for my circumstances. The only limitations with a wok are those dictated by the rules of therm o-dynamics, and your own mind. If you season it properly, you will find it a real dynamic and userful cooking tool. But know this ahead of time. Though it will cook a great many foods, in a great many ways, it won't make waffles or pancakes for you. I'm pretty sure I could coax it into making a strange shaped, but delicious apple pie, if I needed to. And as far as that cooking popcorn thing, it's my go-to pot for that. It does a brilliant job and makes a big batch.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 08:53 AM   #32
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
The first one you posted will work good for your situation.

1:Since you are only cooking for your self get the small one.

2:depends upon how you will use it. If you do not plan to put it in the oven wood will work good.

3:Cast Iron. My Carbon Steel wok is easy to care for but my Cast Iron one seasoned better. But Cast Iron does not come in a flat bottom.

4:You can cook all of those. My seasoned woks cook fried eggs with ease.
__________________
My blog https://jamesstrange.com/
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 08:54 AM   #33
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by artofcooking View Post
Okay, so based on what everyone said, I think carbon steel is the way to go. I want to purchase one from the Wok Shop and am leaning towards the wok shop: carbon steel wok - side handle or the wok shop: selling woks for 40 years (strange color, huh?)

My coiled electric stove is 7 inch diameter and I only cook for myself, mainly Pad Thai and stir fry veggies/rice in wok. A few more questions:
1. What diameter wok should I get?
2. What types of handles are best?
3. Which type of wok is relatively easy to care for?
4. Can I make fried egg, mushroom masala, aloo gobi in it?
I'm sure you'll be happy with either one you linked. I haven't had the need for a helper handle yet, but I can see where it might come in handy if you have a lot of food in the wok.
I'm not sure those come with lids though. A lid can be handy for giving veggies a quick steam... or making copious amounts of popcorn
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 04:16 PM   #34
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Okay, so I'm almost decided on 12":
http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...d-handles.html
As well as a flat lid:
http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...cess_lids.html

I like the short wooden helper handles because storage is easier.
I like the flat lid as it is easier to hold.

I'll probably make the purchase tomorrow unless anyone thinks there is a better pick!
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 09:32 AM   #35
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 2,031
I had a expensive wok and cooked in it for awhile - then when we moved I could n't find in it in all the boxes but had my cast iron pan - used that - when i finally found the wok it went bye bye and I always use my cast iron as it does a great job.
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:04 PM   #36
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
Thank you everybody!

I bought the wooden handle wok with a flat lid for $43.51 (a lot less than £219.00!!).

wok with 2 wood spool handles: 12-inchm flat bottom $19.95
wok lids: flat lid for 12 inch wok $11.95
Subtotal 31.90
Shipping 9.30
Tax 2.31
Total 43.51

I really look forward to cooking with this wok and appreciate all your combined years of experience (500 total?!!).
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:09 PM   #37
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,599
Actually I only feel 500...
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:16 PM   #38
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: California
Posts: 37
lol... maybe the total is 404 [internet joke].

One more question actually:
Which utensils and material should I buy for the carbon steel wok and stir frying? Silicone, steel, nylon?
I have some bamboo ones (the round one, the flat one with holes, and the round one with holes), but they get quite dirty and impossible to clean fully... I don't want to mix in old bacteria.
artofcooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 12:20 PM   #39
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,599
Steel utensils are fine. I like wooden utensils, before using them I soak them in mineral oil, wood and bamboo are naturally anti-biotic. The oil soaks in the pores so they don't pull in liquid and they clean easier.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2013, 05:37 PM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,902
I have a bamboo cooking set I received with an electric non-stick wok as a wedding present 28 years ago and I still use them. As long as you get any solid material off, you're fine. From what I've read, the wood pulls in the moisture from bacteria and kills them by drying them out.

Btw, I do a lot of cooking in that wok and it works just fine I have not felt the need to replace it.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cookware

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.