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Old 03-03-2002, 01:36 PM   #1
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Worst cookware

The worst cookware I ever used was that glass cookware that my poor daughter was given as a gift. Everything stuck to it and I absolutely hated it. Now, I use Analon which I truly love although I wish I still had a cast iron frying pan for my fried potatoes, which I still can't make worth a hoot!

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Old 03-03-2002, 03:29 PM   #2
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Run and get a cast iron frying pan!!!!! A person can't live without one and I'm pretty sure it's against the law in the US NOT to have one!!!! LOL. Yep, I may just have a little one but nothing cooks like cast iron. I borrowed a glass pot from my MIL only to do mustards in. I used it one other time to cook some broccoli in. They just don't "look" like anything wonderful could come out of them!! LOL - And when is the last time you walked into a professional kitchen and saw glass pots! - NEVER!!
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Old 03-03-2002, 05:05 PM   #3
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worst kitchen utensils, etc.

You get your sweet bippie I'll get a cast iron frying pan...you talked me into it!!! I'll probably have to go 45 miles to the City to a place with kitchenware as I live in a tiny hick town with no stores and all I have are the Analon pieces I bought which are wonderful for some things but certainly don't give the same results as the old cast iron.

My daughter got rid of those glass horrors thank God. She had them foisted on her by her MIL as a gift or would never have gotten them:p

This forum is so nice I'm really hooked on it (and, where else would I get to see those great cheesy smilies)?:D :D :D :D
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Old 03-03-2002, 05:21 PM   #4
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Cookie,
As a resident of a totally Podunk town too...you might try the HARDWARE store for the cast iron skillet. I'm sure they have that! I found the best cast iron skillet I've ever had with the campstoves and other camping/fishing gear!
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Old 03-03-2002, 05:32 PM   #5
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Norma, you beat me to it!!! Our hardware store here has great cast iron things and at a great price. This is also where I have to buy my pressure cooker rubber gaskets! :D
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Old 03-03-2002, 06:05 PM   #6
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:p !
Well, when ya live in PODUNK you come to know WalMart and the Hardware store TOO well! I grocery shop "across the border" in Texas. My first week here in Podunk, I spent 45 minutes in the "spices/baking aisle" of one of the tiny grocery stores, thinking I was just NOT seeing the thyme or basil! Then I realized, nope, spices here are salt, pepper, and BarBQ seasonings. I'm a Texan, I NEED my cumin, chili powder and cilantro!!!
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Old 03-03-2002, 06:08 PM   #7
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I only have ONE thing to say about the glass (?) stove top cookware....................no, I'm not gonna say it, because this is POLITE company!!!
Suffice to say, I bought a set when it first came out, and got RID of it after the first use!
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Old 03-04-2002, 08:31 AM   #8
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worst cookware

I don't drive and the only time I can get up to a city that has any sort of cookware is when my daughter has a neurologist's appointment (she had those three brain surgeries last year and still feels pretty sick when she drives such distances); our hardware store is about the size of my tiny apartment so they don't even have anything like that there. I'll have to do the catalog bit, just as I do most of my spices. What culture shock after Buffalo!

This town is sooooo Podunk it makes Mayberry, USA, look like a booming metropolis and about as entertaining as partying in a wet grave!:D
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Old 03-04-2002, 04:18 PM   #9
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Cookie - now THAT'S a small town you live in. LOL. I sure hope your daughter starts feeling better. How scary that must have been. Good vibes and prayers going her way.
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Old 03-04-2002, 06:30 PM   #10
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worst cookware

Thanks for your good wishes. Yes...this place is a real one horse town (without the horse). It was terrifying when my daughter had those awful surgeries and this forum helps me take my mind off the continual worries about her.:)
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Old 03-04-2002, 07:12 PM   #11
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I lived in a town so small in northern Vermont (5 miles from the Canadian border) that there was no "downtown". Depending on where you lived you either went "upstreet" or "downstreet". And, to the best of my recollection, there were 2 stoplights "upstreet" (I lived at the bottom of the hill ;))
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Old 03-04-2002, 08:55 PM   #12
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Hi all!

You guys have me convinced that I need a cast iron frying pan!! I've also heard that the best corn bread is made in one...

Anyway, can anybody tell me how to season a cast iron frying pan. My grandmother always just wiped hers out and I never saw her actually wash it or anything...

Thanks a bunch!
-Eric
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Old 03-04-2002, 09:10 PM   #13
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Everything you need to know.....

How to 'Season' Cast Iron Cookware

Seasoning is the process of allowing oil to be absorbed into the iron, creating a non-stick, rustproof finish. Here's how to do it:

1. Wash with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush. Rinse and dry completely.
2. Oil the cookware (inside and out) with MELTED solid vegetable shortening.
3. Turn upside down on the top rack of a 350F pre-heated oven.
4. Put aluminum foil on the bottom rack to catch any excess drippings.
5. Bake the cookware for one hour at 350F.
6. Let the cookware cool slowly in the oven.
7. Store, uncovered, in a dry place when cooled.

NEVER wash your cast iron cookware in a dishwasher. I have always washed mine while pot/pan is still hot with a scrub brush and no soap. Like stoneware, cast iron may absorb the soap and then leave a soapy taste in foods. I have always dried mine by placing back on the burner and turning on until dry. Let cool slightly and rub on Crisco.


Rust Spots

If your old or new cast iron ware gets light rust spots, scour the rusty areas with steel wool, i.e. SOS pad, until all traces of rust are gone. Wash, dry and repeat seasoning process.

Metallic Taste

If your food gets a metallic taste, or turns "black", it means one of two things are wrong. Either your pot has not been sufficiently seasoned, or you are leaving the food in the pot after it has been cooked. Cast iron utensils are NOT to be used as storage vessels. Remove food from the cookware as soon as it is cooked. Always clean your utensils immediately with boiling hot water and brush. Rinse and dry thoroughly. Prior to storing, oil very lightly with vegetable shortening, such as Crisco or spray with a shortening spray, such as Pam, then wipe dry with paper towel. Store in a dry place uncovered. This is especially important in humid climates. If you put a lid on a pot for storage, condensation could occur causing rust. Give your pot clean, dry air in a place where the temperature is fairly stable.

More Tips

It is recommended that you cook foods with high fat and grease content the first few times to expedite seasoning. This would include cooking bacon. sausage, hamburger, or deep frying potatoes, chicken, etc. Soups, stews, etc. (foods with high moisture and acid content) have a tendency to remove seasoning from a cast iron utensil and may want to be avoided at first, or be aware your utensil may have to be re-seasoned after use. After regular use, clean, oil lightly while warm, then wipe dry with paper towel or soft cloth before storing. Your ironware will darken with use and improve with age. A well used piece of ironware will develop a patina that truly is the ultimate in non stick cookware.

Bakeware

In the case of a cast iron cake pan, corn stick pan, popover pan or muffin pan, if seasoned properly, as previously stated, you should have great success with no sticking occurring. Prior to cooking in these utensils oil well, or spray heavily with Pam or other similar spray shortening. It could be said that Pam is cast iron bakeware's best friend. NOTE: Before baking in any cast iron utensil, oil and preheat before pouring in the batter and bake in a preheated oven.

Serving from a Cast Iron Black Pot

If you are camping out or having a western party at home and want to serve beans, stew or chili from the cookware, a few rules are to be followed and no metallic taste will be imparted.

Keep food simmering in the pot until ready to take to the table. To protect the table from the hot pot, place it on some form of trivet. After food is served, cover the pot to keep food hot for second helpings. As soon as the meal is finished, remove food, wash utensils, dry and prepare for storing.

Nutritional Benefit of Ironware

You may not be aware that iron cookware imparts a significant amount of dietary iron to your food, which is absorbed by the body. In other words, cast iron is the healthiest cookware on the market.

Energy Savers

Cast iron cookware is the original waterless, energy saving cookware and served this purpose in the sparse life of the pioneers.

The most tender of roasts, cooked in a variety of sauces can be simmered while on low heat on top of the range in a Lodge Dutch Oven. Very little moisture and/or juices are lost, and top- of-the-range cooking is very inexpensive.

Temperatures

Cast iron cookware evenly distributes heat. It discourages "hot spots". If your food burns, it means only one thing - you got the pot too hot. Less heat is needed with cast iron. However, searing, etc. needs to be done on medium-high heat, with temperatures lowered for slow cooking. You will learn the techniques of this cookware as you become experienced with its nature.


You WON'T be sorry - you will love it. - When I cook cornbread I put the pan in the oven with some butter in it. Once pan is heated and butter is melted (about 15 minutes or so) I then pour in batter. This will create and great crust on the outside of the cornbread.
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Old 03-04-2002, 11:28 PM   #14
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Cast Iron really is the best cookware...but probably too heavy to handle for every use, at least that's the case for me. I won't part with my cast iron skillet though, heavy as it is. It makes the BEST cornbread. Since I seldom fry anything, the old cast iron is used almost exclusively for cornbread...and it doesn't have to be washed after every use. I use corn oil ...and when the cornbread is taken out, I just wipe out the inside with a paper towel.
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Old 03-05-2002, 01:57 AM   #15
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Wow! Thank you very much! I learned alot today!!
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Old 03-05-2002, 09:14 AM   #16
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You're welcome Eric. When you're ready we'll all post our favorite cornbread recipes. There are some good ones out there and some of them are meals by themself!!!!
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Old 03-05-2002, 04:02 PM   #17
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Cast Iron Frittata

Eric: After you make the corn bread, and have just about everything together for a great breakfast, try you Cast Iron pan for a Frittata. I did one in mine last year and haven't stopped since! Easier than an omlette, and more impressive for guests too.
Finally,
David
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Old 03-05-2002, 09:21 PM   #18
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I agree on the frittata Finally. I like red onions, peppers, mushrooms sauteed in Tonkatsu sauce (Japanese - and makes a great sauce for the frittata - used fairly sparingly) with some cubed potatoes. Add the eggs - YUM. Sounds like a good dinner one night this week.
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Old 03-05-2002, 10:13 PM   #19
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Kitchenelf and David; the Frittia's sound totally yummie !
Ok, I DO have a question for Alton Brown! I'm sure he'll know....why are they called RED onions....when those delectible orbs are PURPLE!?!?!?!??!
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Old 03-05-2002, 10:14 PM   #20
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Kitchenelf and Finally; the frittatas sound totally yummie !
Ok, I DO have a question for Alton Brown! I'm sure he'll know....why are they called RED onions....when those delectible orbs are PURPLE!?!?!?!??!
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