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Old 08-31-2007, 07:39 PM   #1
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ISO of advice, Shun knives

Most of my knives are Wusthof, which I'm very, very happy with. After perusing several catalogues, I found a Shun Classic 10" Chef's knife for the same price I'd be spending on the Wusthof.

Anybody ever use any of the Shun Classic knives? Any input?

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Old 08-31-2007, 07:43 PM   #2
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Never heard of them.Are they Japanese made?
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Old 08-31-2007, 07:48 PM   #3
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They are. A city called Seki, I believe?

Here it is:
http://www.cutleryandmore.com/details.asp?SKU=5287
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Old 08-31-2007, 08:25 PM   #4
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Shuns are highly praised in many culinary circles. Sharper angle on the edge, and typically holds its edge longer than most knives.

The one you linked to looked like Damascus steel which was exciting…..but then I read further and see that it only appears that way (probably with laser etching). It’s not Damascus steel nor is it likely to have been forged in the same manner (especially not at that price!). The handle is old school classic, and takes a little getting used to if you’re used to the handles on western and European knives.

Shun has more to offer than just this particular line. Shuns are good knives, but personally, I’d not put money into this particular style since it seems a bit gimmicky in trying to LOOK like Damascus steel even though it is not. If I were going to buy a Shun, I’d go with their Pro line.
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Old 09-01-2007, 01:06 PM   #5
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Hrmm...

Prolly just go with the Wusthof classic 10" Chef knife.
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Old 09-01-2007, 03:33 PM   #6
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Shun knives are bad ***. I have one, but it's the Pro 2 line. The rest of my knives are Henckles Pro-S.

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/details.asp?SKU=10998
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Old 09-02-2007, 11:34 AM   #7
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Seki city is one of the blade steel meccas. Vg-10 comes from Seki city and is one of the best knife steels out there for those of us who can't afford zdp189 steel.
Here's a commercial Alton brown made for Shun knives http://video.google.com/googleplayer...00188336&hl=en
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Old 09-21-2007, 09:36 AM   #8
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Hi Everyone,

I've used a couple of Shun knives and I think they're great. In particular, I love my Shun Classic U2 (Ultimate Utility) Knife. It's great for slicing tomatoes.

Hope that helps!

-Mary
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Old 09-21-2007, 09:40 AM   #9
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I wonder if the 'D' shaped handle is available for South Paws?

Like Keltin said, any knife trying to look like something else (damascus) I would stay away from.
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:39 PM   #10
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I wonder if the 'D' shaped handle is available for South Paws?

Like Keltin said, any knife trying to look like something else (damascus) I would stay away from.
Yes it is available for lefties The Damascus on shun knives is a tougher more stain resistant steel on the outside with the more edge retaining vg-10 steel making up the core that's actually sharpened.
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Old 09-27-2007, 03:50 PM   #11
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There are kershaw Shun knives on closeout at Bud K now.
And shipping is $1.00.
Collectable Swords| Collectable Knives | Medieval Swords | Fantasy Swords | BudK.com
Prices seem to average around $70.
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Old 09-27-2007, 03:57 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by GrillingFool View Post
There are kershaw Shun knives on closeout at Bud K now.
And shipping is $1.00.
Collectable Swords| Collectable Knives | Medieval Swords | Fantasy Swords | BudK.com
Prices seem to average around $70.

Do I look under Medieval Arms or Bowies and daggers?
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Old 09-27-2007, 04:21 PM   #13
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Do I look under Medieval Arms or Bowies and daggers?
I think they're in the Ninja category.....with the nunchuckas and stuff.
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Old 12-29-2007, 04:53 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Billdolfski View Post
Most of my knives are Wusthof, which I'm very, very happy with. After perusing several catalogues, I found a Shun Classic 10" Chef's knife for the same price I'd be spending on the Wusthof.

Anybody ever use any of the Shun Classic knives? Any input?

I realize this thread is a bit old and you may not still be looking, but I thought I'd chime in. The Shun knives are terrific, IMO. They're comprised of a core of VG10, a very, very hard steel, laminated with 16 layers of softer stainless. The hard core will take a breathtaking edge and hold it very well; the softer steel protects the core from chipping. Shuns are vastly sharper than German knives and their bevels are sharpened at 16 degrees per side (vs 22 or so for German blades). There's no contest in the cutting department- the Shun Classics will greatly outperform conventional European cutler.

The only caveat re the Shuns is that, like nearly all Japanese knives, you have to be a bit careful about working with things that could chip them. The upside to high hardness is edge retention and the ability so sharpen at a very steep angle. The downside of hardness is that the edge is just slightly brittle vs the much softer German style blade. Use a cutting board (not a glass one!), don't cut frozen food and watch out for bones and you'll have no problems. My Shuns have performed wonderfully in several professional kitchens with no problems at all.

Note: you probably want to avoid the "Pro" line, unless you're specifically looking for Japanese-style blades. That line is for tradition Japanese cooking; you'll probably find Usubas and Deba, while they superficially resemble European styles, are not well suited to the same tasks. For one thing, they're only sharpened on one side (ie they're single bevel knives). A deba resembles a French knife but won't rock/chop the same way.

The Classic line is made up mostly of Western style knives. For the money they're very hard to beat.
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