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Old 11-04-2004, 12:38 PM   #21
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I'm with GB and Audeo.

A santuko is designed for slicing. I have a Wusthof Grand Prix and slice very well, it does. It even has the "granton" edge which, as GB points out, is a crock of ##.

A good chef's knife is easier to use and more versatile. But you need to be pretty obsessive about keeping it sharp.
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Old 11-04-2004, 12:44 PM   #22
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Ditto on the obsessive sharpening. I recently bought a full set of Henckels (and nearly bankrupted myself in the process). My Gf is always peering at me oddly because I clean, dry and steel them between every use, without fail... :)
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Old 11-05-2004, 04:14 AM   #23
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GB and Audeo
Thanks for your response.
Your evaluation is what I have discovered.
I usually skin these ___ geneticly engineered tomatoes before I slice them. Not required with the Santorku!
I'll keep using it and evaluate each application.
I guess that's why we have so many different knives.

Thanks again,
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Old 11-05-2004, 07:11 AM   #24
 
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Re: Knives...so many to choose from...which do I buy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcellarella
I have a set of mediocre knives in my kitchen. They are okay but I do a lot of cooking and would like to find a good all purpose very sharp knife that I can use for everything, but mostly chopping veggies. I have no idea where to start though. I go to the store and there are so many to choose from! Does anyone know of a good company? The name of a good knife? I guess I'm not looking to spend too much on it...$40 max.

Thanks for any advice! :)
The people on the knife forum I visit are singing the praises of carbon steel knives. As far as inexpensive carbon steel knives are concerned, this is what they say,

"1095 carbon steel, which is very simple and cheap is my favorite. This is what the famous K-Bar WWII knives are made from as well as old butcher knives, the Old Hickory series (which work as good as any of my good Japanese stainless knives) are 1095, as well as many high end non-kitchen knives that are popular amongs knife enthusiasts today including most knives from the noted maker Newt Livesay, K-Bar, Camillus (e.g. the Fighting Utility Knife), and nice knives from Bark River Tool and BlackJack. The great functioning Opinel knives are reportedly a simple carbon steel similar to 1085 steel.

Somehow knives that cost $100+ will never seem resonable to me. Fine if you can't resist spending money but you can buy a whole fistful of great knives for a lot less! They may not be fancy but knives from Old Hickory (new), old Dexter, Olsen and Russel kitchen knives in carbon steel (ebay is a great source) will take and hold as good of an edge as any, cut as good as any, and you won't have to get a second mortgage to buy them."

I hope that helps.
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Old 11-05-2004, 07:32 AM   #25
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This all makes me think of Psiguyy....I believe it was he whom I was trying to get in his will for his damascus blade Japanese knives.....

I actually dreamt about those the other day!
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Old 11-05-2004, 07:39 AM   #26
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I agree with the idea that carbon steel knives are great steel for holding an edge, and use. However, they rust very quickly if left wet, or if acidic foods are on them. Plus, they will give some foods a metallic flavor, so you have to know what you can and can't use them for.

My family purchased for me last Christmas, a Croma 12 inch chef's knife. It is the easiest knife I have ever used and is not as heavy as the German high-end products. I've sharpened it lightly one time since it was unrapped, and it is still razor sharp. I goes through tomatoes effortlessly, with the skin on. It also cuts thick skinned winter squash, mellons, spuds, meats, etc. with equal ease. Best of all, due to the unique handle design, it is so controllable that I can use the tip to core apples, or tomatoes, carve designs from veggies, etc. It is super easy to clean and maintain. And yes I do steel it before each use.

The knife is made from Japanese 301 stainless and was designed by an engineer from the Porsche famile, F.A. Porsche.

I never would have spent the money to buy this knife myself. I too was skepticle of its bang for the buck. But now that I have it, if I lost it, I would immediately have to replace it. It's that good. It's almost as much fun to use as a great mortorcycle. :D

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Old 11-05-2004, 07:51 AM   #27
 
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True, carbon steel knives can rust if not properly cared for. Any knife requires proper care, carbon steel only requires you clean it right away and dry it immediately. It is something you would do for any decent knife.

But I have never myself encountered [or have I ever heard of] a taste change in food cut with a carbon steel knife.

I could understand an off taste developing if you put a carbon steel knife in a pot of acidic food for a few minutes. It would be like leaving food in a cast iron skillet or pot too long.

But cutting/chopping does not leave the knife in contact with the food for more than a split second. It is not really long enough to affect the taste of the food cut adversely in my experience. I have used carbon steel knives all of my life, so have my parents and my grandparents.
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Old 11-05-2004, 03:25 PM   #28
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Since your price point is around $40, look at the Calphlon knives. I personally use Henckels Pro S, I bought the Calphalon knive for my daughter (at Linens and Things). Santoku knife was $35. I liked it enough that I will get a few pieces to try myself. Also, the Calphalon knives have gotten good reviews.....

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Old 11-05-2004, 03:27 PM   #29
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anyone ever use one of those ceramic knives that ming tsai hawks?

they look cool, but i wonder how well they work...
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Old 11-05-2004, 03:29 PM   #30
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Since your price point is around $40, look at the Calphlon knives. I personally use Henckels Pro S, I bought the Calphalon knive for my daughter (at Linens and Things). Santoku knife was $35. I liked it enough that I will get a few pieces to try myself. Also, the Calphalon knives have gotten good reviews.....

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Old 11-05-2004, 03:58 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
anyone ever use one of those ceramic knives that ming tsai hawks?

they look cool, but i wonder how well they work...
I have heard that they work well, BUT are too fragile to really be worth it. They are incredibly sharp, but I even read of one person who chipped his slicing a tomato on a wood cutting board. He claims he was not being rough at all. If you ever drop one of those, forget it. It is all done. Even if I had unlimited $$$ I still would not want to deal with that. Who needs to go out and replace a knife every time you drop it or use it a little harder than you should?
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Old 11-05-2004, 08:28 PM   #32
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I have some carbon steel knives that I inherited from my grandparents. And until I got the Croma, preffered them above almost all other knives in my home, especially the cheap stainless, and infomercial-type knives. I only have one never sharpen knife that's worth a hoot, and it came as a free gift with a set of pots'n pans.

But I do witness that there are a few items that can react with the steel and create off-tastes and smells. But what really sells me on the Croma is that unique handle. It makes handling the quality steel effortless. And the grind is flat, rather than hollow ground. This makes slicing through tough food much easier.

I have to admit that for meats, my carbon steel slicing knife does a very fine job. But it dulls maore easily and needs more attention. Also, I like the utility of the chef's knife more than the slicing knife.

My son has the Croma Santoku and loves it. But them, he prefers to chop things, whey I slice them. The Chef's kife point drops from the spine to align with the handles mid-point. This gives me precise tip control.

But let's face it. What is perfect for my hand, and the way I use a knife is awkward for my wife. Some people love the standard three-rivet hardwood handle design as it just fits them better.

In any knife purchase, it truly is best if you can test-drive the knife before purchasing. Find what works for you, and weigh the advantages and faults of the various knife types. Get the knife that best suits you.

One surprise for me is the fragility of ceramic knives. There are ceramics that are tougher than steel. Ceramics are widely used in the water pump industry because of their toughness and because they don't corode. Also, there are ceramic berings, piston rings, tiles, etc. that are used specifically becasue of their hardness, and stregnth. But it dose depend on the ceramic molecular matrix, and what the ceramic is made from. Maybe the tough ones not suitable for knife use, or maybe their just too expensive.

In any case, I'm entirley too long winded.

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Old 11-05-2004, 08:41 PM   #33
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You have always spoke highly about your Chroma Goodweed. That knife looks very cool. I am going to test drive one soon. I think I want one.
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Old 11-05-2004, 09:03 PM   #34
 
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Well Goodweed, I know I will never get a chroma. Too expensive for my tastes.

And hey, if there is a taste with carbon steel, I must be used to it! Different strokes for different folks! Everybody can't like the same thing.
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Old 11-05-2004, 09:12 PM   #35
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Actually ChoclateChef, I applaude your remarks. You have found something you like, and will stick with it. I see no problem with your choices as they are right for you. And that's what picking tools is all about. Do what suits you, not what suits me, or your mother, or the guy down the street.

Certainly, listen to what others have to say. But in the end, if you do things to satisfy only others, then you cheat yourself.

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Old 11-06-2004, 09:26 AM   #36
 
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You are a real nice guy Goodweed! :D Thank you.

I like the old tried and true, but sometimes you need enough information on a new technology to determine if it is time for a change.

That is what you do. You give the information I need on new technology. Thanks.
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