"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-26-2007, 11:29 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
chave982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 246
Santoku knife reviews?

I'm looking into purchasing a Santoku knife to replace my old Cutco chef's knife. The one I'm looking at is this: Henckels Twin Cuisine 7-Inch Hollow-Edge Santoku

Does anyone know if this is a good knive or not? I'm not very familiar with all of Henckels' product lines (Twin Cermax, Twin Select, Twin Cuisine, etc.), but it seems as though the Twin Cuisine line is maybe the 3rd best? Not sure on that..

Just wondering if anybody had any opinions/reviews before I make my purchase. Thanks!

__________________

chave982 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2007, 02:43 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,557
It's a very, very good knife. I have the Henckles Pro-S 7" santoku which is in effect the same blade, but the handle is different. You won't be disappointed as long as you take care of it.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2007, 02:51 PM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,098
When I took my sister knife shopping, she handled a dozen knives and chose the Henckels Pro S. She has been very happy with it.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2007, 03:06 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by chave982
Does anyone know if this is a good knive or not? I'm not very familiar with all of Henckels' product lines (Twin Cermax, Twin Select, Twin Cuisine, etc.), but it seems as though the Twin Cuisine line is maybe the 3rd best? Not sure on that..

Just wondering if anybody had any opinions/reviews before I make my purchase. Thanks!
That, I'm not sure of. But I think they market their Pro-S and 5-Star as their two top of the line styles. As long as you're getting one of their single forged, ice-hardened friodur high-carbon blades, the handle of the knife is simply ergonomics. Get whichever one you feel comfortable with.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 01:14 AM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by chave982
I'm looking into purchasing a Santoku knife to replace my old Cutco chef's knife. The one I'm looking at is this: Henckels Twin Cuisine 7-Inch Hollow-Edge Santoku

Does anyone know if this is a good knive or not? I'm not very familiar with all of Henckels' product lines (Twin Cermax, Twin Select, Twin Cuisine, etc.), but it seems as though the Twin Cuisine line is maybe the 3rd best? Not sure on that..

Just wondering if anybody had any opinions/reviews before I make my purchase. Thanks!
i recently went into bed bath & beyond and asked if i could handle the knives... to see which one felt best in my hand.

i liked the henckels, and i liked the furi santoku knives.

but OUTSIDE of the "expensive" knife case, i handled the anolon 7" santoku and it actually felt BETTER than the other more expensive knives.

so, i laid down the $29 and left with the anolon.
black chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 08:43 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
chave982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 246
As far as the practical uses of a Santoku knife goes, can it completely replace a chef's knife? I was planning on giving away my Cutco chef's knife to my brother, and then buy the Santoku to replace it.
chave982 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 09:25 AM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by chave982
As far as the practical uses of a Santoku knife goes, can it completely replace a chef's knife? I was planning on giving away my Cutco chef's knife to my brother, and then buy the Santoku to replace it.

The santoku cannot be used to chop through small bones such as those in chicken as a chef's knife can. It has a thinner and lighter blade.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 10:29 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Midwest
Posts: 258
Send a message via AIM to Mark Webster
Just remember that you can buy an inexpensive knife if a) you don'y use it often or b) you don't mind buying a another knife in the near future. The Santoku has gained attention because of its use by TV Chefs, but it is a fun knife to play with. In the restaurant I work at we prepare everything in such large quanities it does not make sense to use it when a Chefs knife is really needed. Just take care of your knife by sharpening properly, cleaning it and drying it before storing.
__________________
Mark Webster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 10:43 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
LEFSElover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: ...lala land..............
Posts: 3,695
I had ordered the Wusthof one from the Mall knife store. It came in and it was the Henckel instead. DS picked it up for me and I was annoyed that it was wrong brand. Henckel was cheaper and I paid Wusthof price. Brought it home, I felt it, tried it and took it back. The weight for me wasn't there and didn't feel as substantial either. Ordered the right one and I've loved my Wusthof ever since. To me, well worth the money.
__________________
...Trials travel best when you're taking the transportation known as prayer...SLRC
LEFSElover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 11:50 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The santoku cannot be used to chop through small bones such as those in chicken as a chef's knife can. It has a thinner and lighter blade.
My Lamsons are very simillar in thickness and weight. Before I ordered my 8" chef, I could use the santoku to go right through chicken bones.

I mainly use my santoku for chiffanades or juliennes.
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 03:33 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 383
i have 2 santokus and i like them because i simply like the control and "feel" i have with them.

but NOTHING can replace my chef's knife... cause when it's time to "rock" that blade and chop some veggies, herbs, etc. quickly and SMOOTHLY, i'm simply better (much better) with the chef's knife.
black chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2007, 01:58 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3
I have a couple of santoku and two different chef's knives (6' and 10"). In general, I prefer the santoku, however, the 10" knife is still my choice for chopping. Not just because of the rock (though that does help) but also because the blade is longer. My santoku are both fairly short, however.
Bedeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2007, 12:42 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 383
i recently received the furi coppertail as a gift, and i must admit...

it feels GREAT in my hand!!!!
black chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 03:47 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 17
Santoku Review

I have all Wusthof Classic knives, 10 inch chef's, 8 inch chef's and a 7 1/2 inch Santoku with granton edge. I love them all, but the Santoku is my very favorite. I suppose it's because of the hollow ground blade and divets. the divets allow super fine (almost transparent) potato slices, for instance, and the slices will not stick to the blade, the divets allow air to enter between the blade and what you are slicing. However, the other 2 knives have advantages, such as greater weight, that make them better for other things.
Dartssnake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2007, 12:26 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1
Cermax Santoku

Last Christmas I was given a Cermax Santoku knife... I need to explain something first, I have for over $2500 worth of knives in my block, not that I want to brag but I want to illustrate that when it comes to knives, money is never an issue for me (just for knives though...). Anyhow to make a long story short, to my opinion Henckels Cermax are the very best Santoku knives you can buy. The are sharp beyond reason, sharper than a Kasumi. The advantange of super sharpness is speed and precision. On the flip side, since the blade is soooo sharp, it is more brittle and therefore should be use appropriately, second, you will need a stone to sharpen it (more importantly, you will need to know how to use a stone first, so practice on sheap knives before). There is no way you can send this knife to be sharpen to your run of the mill place, it needs to be handle by someone who can appreciate the structure of the blade and this won't be accomplished by some clerk behind a counter.


OK... not everyone need or want this kind of knife, I realize that. Since I have handled different quality of knife, let me say this... You really get what you are paying for. At first a $29 dollar knife can look as good and feel as good and a more expensive knife but trust me they aren't. The grain of the blade (texture of the metal) will be coarser and after the initial few usages, it won't glide as smootly and will feel rough. Further more, cheap knives get dull quite quickly and let's face it most people will put up with a dull knife far longer than they should.

My reasonng when I am buyng a knife is this: I am most likely to keep this knife forever and very unlikely to replace it. I want to be comfortable with the knife and enjoy using it. Since I don't buy a knife every month, I wan't to get it right the first time. This makes it enjoyable to use. I will bite the bullet but will be over with.

Remember a sharp knife is a safe knife...
__________________

saby72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×