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Old 08-18-2020, 03:00 PM   #1
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Question about Pressure Canning Pate and Terrine

On the Newfoundland Episode of Parts Unknown, I noticed that the Joe Beef guys opened a few cans of what looked like pressure-canned pate and terrines. They looked like 28oz. cans to me. I can't remember all the types of pate, maybe a while hare terrine, wild boar, there was a jellied foie gras ...? But I've searched online for recipes for pressure canning pate and terrine and not found much. I know it's done on an industrial scale (thinking about spam, for instance)but am curious if anyone has any thoughts on doing this at home? One concern seems to be the density of a pate -- especially in a 28 oz. can, would heat penetrate deeply enough for safe processing? Or is it possible they just made the pates and terrines and simply stored them in the cans under refrigeration? W/o being processed in the pressure canner? Would love to hear anyone's thoughts as I really love the idea of having some fun pates and terrines canned and ready to eat whenever.

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Old 08-18-2020, 03:44 PM   #2
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Welcome to DC Andrew!

About the only insight I can give is that I have made Cretons, wrapped well, and frozen them. They were good.

Having never made terrines nor pates - can't help there. Have a feeling that the only way actual canning could be done is industrial? JMHO but seeing as I don't can meats of any sort I'm just guessing.

There are members here who do - they should be along soon.
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Old 08-18-2020, 04:05 PM   #3
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Thanks for the welcome and reply! I've frozen rillettes before too and it worked well. I'd actually never thought of canning pate or terrine until I saw it on the episode, but have kept thinking about it since I saw it. Hoping there's a way of doing it, though my intuition is that especially in a 28 oz. can the density would be too much.
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Old 08-18-2020, 04:15 PM   #4
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Welcome Andrew. I don't pressure can anymore and haven't done meats. A friend does. She just canned a bunch of "stew". Everything was in stock, not gravy. My friend tells me that something like gravy cannot be home canned safely. So, she adds thickener to the stock before serving the stew. I'm thinking that if gravy is too thick to home pressure can safely, then a terrine or pâté would definitely be too thick.
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Old 08-18-2020, 05:00 PM   #5
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I hsd an uncle who used to can fish, beef, and pork (not altogether). They were both safe, and delicious. Here is a link to a video where the authors show how to safely pressure can meatoaf, terrines, and pate's.

https://canning.wonderhowto.com/how-...nd-fish-77266/

HOwever, use at your own risk. MOst sites state that meatloaf, terrines, and pate's can not be safely canned, even with a pressure canned, as they won't get the middle of the product hot enough to kill all microbes that may be present.

That being said, I would think that if the food is left in a pressure caner long enough, the heat should completely penetrate the food. But again, that;s just a guess.

I know of only two ways to insure that pate' terrine, and meatloaf are safe for long term storage; freeze them in airtight containers, with all air removed, or irradiate them with gama rays. Most of us don't have access to gamma ray emitters, The Incredible Hulk..

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Old 08-18-2020, 08:23 PM   #6
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Welcome to DC, Andrew. If you find something that works well, I hope you share. Canned pate or terrine to have on demand would be awesome!
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Old 08-18-2020, 08:38 PM   #7
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Welcome to the forum!

While I have a pressure canner, I think that I would prefer to freeze patés, and things like that. It seems that some of the things that I put in them (sometimes cheeses, and the like) might be degraded by the higher temperatures in the pressure canning. To make them last much longer than normal, make it into a mold, freeze it, and then, if you have something like a Foodsaver, vacuum seal it, to pull out all of the air it would be in contact with.
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Old 08-18-2020, 09:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
Welcome to the forum!

While I have a pressure canner, I think that I would prefer to freeze patés, and things like that. It seems that some of the things that I put in them (sometimes cheeses, and the like) might be degraded by the higher temperatures in the pressure canning. To make them last much longer than normal, make it into a mold, freeze it, and then, if you have something like a Foodsaver, vacuum seal it, to pull out all of the air it would be in contact with.
+1 Sounds like a plan.
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Old 08-19-2020, 06:25 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewP View Post
Thanks for the welcome and reply! I've frozen rillettes before too and it worked well. I'd actually never thought of canning pate or terrine until I saw it on the episode, but have kept thinking about it since I saw it. Hoping there's a way of doing it, though my intuition is that especially in a 28 oz. can the density would be too much.
Why would you want to do such a large can? Would not a small 150 g (approx.tuna tin size) be more practical?
Were/are you planning hors d'ouerves or a meal?

I've not gone to the link provided but it seems to me it would be safe with the smaller containers.
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:29 PM   #10
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Why would you want to do such a large can? Would not a small 150 g (approx.tuna tin size) be more practical?
Were/are you planning hors d'ouerves or a meal?

I've not gone to the link provided but it seems to me it would be safe with the smaller containers.
I just really liked the presentation in the episode with the large cans. There were probably 8 people around a table, and to break out a few cans of various terrines and slice them up and have them as part of a family-style meal seemed really neat. That said, the consensus seems to be freezing or pressure-cooking for a longer period in smaller containers is almost certainly the safest way to go, which makes a lot of sense. And after reading the discussion my suspicion is that the pates and terrines in the episode were simply canned and then refrigerated or frozen without being processed. Which seems doable as well.

Such a great community this is. Thank you everyone for your replies. I will definitely look at the video above.
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Old 08-19-2020, 03:08 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewP View Post
I just really liked the presentation in the episode with the large cans. There were probably 8 people around a table, and to break out a few cans of various terrines and slice them up and have them as part of a family-style meal seemed really neat. That said, the consensus seems to be freezing or pressure-cooking for a longer period in smaller containers is almost certainly the safest way to go, which makes a lot of sense. And after reading the discussion my suspicion is that the pates and terrines in the episode were simply canned and then refrigerated or frozen without being processed. Which seems doable as well.

Such a great community this is. Thank you everyone for your replies. I will definitely look at the video above.
Presentation is something I have been working on for years. At first, I found it hard to visualize. It is coming easier to me now. I can see how the larger can would make for a nice presentation!
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Old 08-19-2020, 10:18 PM   #12
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Pate' Presentation idea:
1. place 1 tbs. soft pate onto the center of an uncooked won ton skin. Wet the edges with water from a finger bowl. Bring all corners up and pinch together to seal the apte inside. Let dry on cooling rack for 10 minutes. Fry in a couple inches of 365' F, oil until golden brown. Serve on a platter with room temperature cheese cubes.

2. use a star tip on a piping bag to pipe pate onto your favorite crackes.

3. Use piping baf to fill pited olive with pate'.

Terrine Presentation Ideas:
1. Slice chilled, firm terrine into thin squares to fit onto your favorite crackers/wit cheese

2. Cut into logs, and roll in thin, flour tortillas. Fry until golden.

3. Cut and crumble terrine for use in hollowed sub-sandwich buns, with veggies suitable to the terrine.

4. Slice and fry like spam. Serve with a poached, or soft-boiled egg on top.

5.Old School - Terrine Canopies - Slice homemade, dyed bread into star shapes. Use the same star cutter to cut out thin, terrine stars to go on top. Dress with a little tapenade, or pesto, or even mayo and mustard if you prefer. Serve with sweet gherkins and ripe, blank olives.

Just some ideas for when you serve.

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