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-   -   Marinated meat in the freezer (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f80/marinated-meat-in-the-freezer-103479.html)

strmanglr scott 12-06-2019 11:00 AM

Marinated meat in the freezer
 
So, I went to make fried boneless chix thighs. Marinated over night in buttermilk and Frank's Red Hot. Well the next day came and something came up and I couldn't fry off the chix so I threw it in the freezer.

The question, has the marinating process stopped? What's this gonna be like when I thaw it out and cook it?

jennyema 12-06-2019 11:05 AM

It will marinate throughout the thawing process unless you take the chicken out of the bag.

If u leave it in, it might be mushy from the acid I the buttermilk.

Chief Longwind Of The North 12-07-2019 07:10 AM

Remember, acids cause protiens to contract. Acidic marinades only flavor the very outside of the meat placed in them. It's been well established that when marinating, 20 minutes is as good as 20 hours.

Freezing the ckix won't dramatcally change the finished recipe. Ah, but wait, milk and buttermilk both have enzymes that tenderise meat. So, a long soak in a dairy-based liquid will make the chicken more tender, and help coatings, such as seasoned flor, cornmeal, or breadcrumbs stick to the meat pieces.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

GotGarlic 12-07-2019 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North (Post 1610898)
Remember, acids cause protiens to contract. Acidic marinades only flavor the very outside of the meat placed in them. It's been well established that when marinating, 20 minutes is as good as 20 hours.

Freezing the ckix won't dramatcally change the finished recipe. Ah, but wait, milk and buttermilk both have enzymes that tenderise meat. So, a long soak in a dairy-based liquid will make the chicken more tender, and help coatings, such as seasoned flor, cornmeal, or breadcrumbs stick to the meat pieces.

Pear and pineapple juices also contain those enzymes. A long soak in a marinade that contains any of those liquids could cause the meat to be mushy rather than tender. I'd thaw and cook it as soon as possible.

Chief Longwind Of The North 12-07-2019 05:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GotGarlic (Post 1610906)
Pear and pineapple juices also contain those enzymes. A long soak in a marinade that contains any of those liquids could cause the meat to be mushy rather than tender. I'd thaw and cook it as soon as possible.

Pineapple contains bromelaid as the tenderizing agent. Bromelaid is denatured when cooked. This is why you can use canned pineapple in gelatin deserts. If you use fresh pineapple, or pineapple juice, the bromelaid will keep the gelatin fro setting. The same is true of kiwi, and papaya. I never heard of using pear as a tenderizer. That's a new one to me. Thanks for the info.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Cheryl J 12-07-2019 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GotGarlic (Post 1610906)
Pear and pineapple juices also contain those enzymes. A long soak in a marinade that contains any of those liquids could cause the meat to be mushy rather than tender. I'd thaw and cook it as soon as possible.

Agreed....years ago I saw recipes that called for acidic marinades, including buttermilk and thought the longer, the better. Chicken turned mushy so I haven't done it since then. :ohmy::mellow:


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