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my65289stang 08-09-2006 03:37 PM

CHICKEN PAPRIKASH question
 
Anyone have a good recipe for home made noodles that go in chicken paprikash? I don't know if they are any different than any normal home made noodle. My girlfriend loves this stuff-her grandma used to make it for her and her dad still makes it once in awhile. Last time her dad made it(the first time I ever had it) he used egg noodles and she said that it was nowhere near the same so I thought I would ask the experts here and see if anyone had any ideas. I found a few recipes for the paprikash itself but they suggest egg noodles :mad: so if anyone has a complete recipe that would be cool too.

BTW my general thought on the soup is that it is fairly boring but I was told that is how it is supposed to be.....must be a polish thing :rofl: just kidding

EDIT: I guess I have another question. Is this traditionally served as a soup? I am coming across recipes where it is chicken breasts served over egg noodles with a sauce over it. What we had was a soup

Thanks
Brian

ChefScotty 08-09-2006 04:19 PM

I've seens this with all sorts of stuff - noodles, dumplings, spätzle. I had a quick look using paprikache and it doesn't look like there's any right or wrong or standing out preference with the starch. I'd just ask your g/f what sort of noodle she wants and just go for it. I hope whatever you decide to do it comes out nicely.

Loprraine 08-09-2006 05:10 PM

I usually serve it with spatzle. But homemade papardelle is nice also.

my65289stang 08-09-2006 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loprraine
I usually serve it with spatzle. But homemade papardelle is nice also.

Do you happen to have a recipe handy for the soup? the one that I thought I had is incorrect

For the spatzle-i found this recipe:

2 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup water (more or less)


But how thin do you cut it? It just says to cut it thin. Maybe the thickness of a fettucine noodle? I have never had spatzle is the reason I am asking



Thanks
Brian

ChefScotty 08-09-2006 05:52 PM

Spätzle mixture isn't firm and cuttable prior to cooking. You'll need something with large holes to push it through and it'll fall into the boilong water by its own weight - maybe you have a collander or something lying around. They make toys for spätzle like https://kitchenadventures.co.nz/produ...spaz-nd-ac.jpg or https://www.meilleurduchef.com/mdc/ph...menager_gd.jpg

As an aside, lemon thyme leaves in spätzle works rather well with pork and chicken. It's a really bright fresh taste.

Loprraine 08-09-2006 06:11 PM

"What we had was a soup"

You got me on that one. My sauce can be a bit loose ( depending on what errors I've made ), but certainly not a soup.

my65289stang 08-09-2006 06:13 PM

Yeah I would call it a soup. It was mostly tasteless(..oops, did I say that?) liquid with chicken and noodles. Maybe they just make it really thin? :biggrin:

Andy M. 08-09-2006 06:21 PM

Chicken paprikash is a chicken stew with a paprika based sauce or gravy. It would contain both sweet and hot paprikas.

I usually serve it over spaetzle.

my65289stang 08-09-2006 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M.
Chicken paprikash is a chicken stew with a paprika based sauce or gravy. It would contain both sweet and hot paprikas.

I usually serve it over spaetzle.

Ah perfect, this sounds like what I am looking for. Do you have a recipe?

Essie 08-09-2006 06:41 PM

As was stated previously, chicken paprikash is a chicken stew, not a soup. At the end of cooking, a flour, sour cream mixture is added and just warmed up.
I always serve my paprikash with spaetzle.

Andy M. 08-09-2006 07:56 PM

Here you go. I usually serve it with spaetzle as mentioned above ny others. An egg noodle will do as well.

Chicken Paprikash

1 Chicken, 5-6 lbs.

Salt & Pepper
2 Tb Sweet Paprika, divided
Flour
2 Tb Oil
2 C Onions, thinly sliced

1 Tb Garlic, minced
1/2 tsp Ground Cumin
1 Tb Tomato Paste
1/2 C Tomato, chopped
1 Tb Marjoram
1/2 tsp Thyme
1 Bay Leaf
1 Tb Balsamic Vinegar
1/2 C White Wine
1 C Chicken Stock
1/3 C Heavy Cream
2 Roasted Red Peppers, julienned
Parsley, minced
Sour Cream


Cut the chicken into 12 pieces. (drumsticks, wings, thighs and six pieces of breast) Season with salt, pepper and 2 teaspoons of paprika. Lightly coat with flour.



Heat the oil in a large fry pan. Sear chicken pieces until brown on all sides. Remove the chicken from the pan.

Add the onions to the pan and sauté until light brown.

Add the garlic and cumin. Cook 1 more minute.

Add the tomato paste, tomato, and remaining paprika. Stir until well blended.

Add the marjoram, thyme and bay leaf.

Deglaze the pan with the vinegar and wine.

Add the chicken stock. Season with salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil. Add the reserved chicken pieces and cover. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add the cream and simmer for 15 minutes or until the chicken is tender. (Check the thighs)

Remove the chicken from the pan. Puree the sauce and the roasted peppers in a blender. Adjust the seasoning.

Return the chicken and the sauce to the pan and reheat.

Garnish with pepper strips, minced parsley and sour cream.

ronjohn55 08-10-2006 07:03 AM

Mom always made it as a soup, but with what she called dumplings (probably a bit bigger than spatzle, but the same basic thing).

Brian's recipe for them looks about the same as I remember. Mom would also cheat and use the biscuits from a can. Just take a biscuit, tear a piece off, roll it up firm, and into the salted water with it. (I never thought they were quite as good, personally, but they'll do in a pinch).

I have had it with noodles as well, but it was definetly thicker and different than what Mom made.

John

VegasDramaQueen 08-10-2006 07:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loprraine
I usually serve it with spatzle. But homemade papardelle is nice also.

I'm with you on this. Homemade noodles are great but too much bother so I use store bought Pappardelle or Extra Wide Egg Noodles. My favorite is spaetzle. :cool:

my65289stang 08-10-2006 03:21 PM

Here is a recipe that I found that I am thinking about using, tell me what you think:

1 1/2 C water
4-5 lbs chicken pieces, skin removed
1 small onion
2 Tbsp paprika
1 clove of garlic
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon oregano
1/4 C flour
1 C sour cream


1. Water, chicken, onion, paprika, garlic, salt, pepper and oregano into a crockpot. Cook on low 9-10 hours
2. Remove chicken and skim off fat
3. Add sour cream
4. Add chicken

Im not much of a crockpot guru so I don't know how much this will resemble a "soup" like I want after 9 hours in a crock. What do you think? If it wont be "soupy" what could I add to make it that way? Just chix broth?

Essie 08-10-2006 03:40 PM

This is my Hungarian Mom 's recipe.
3 T. Shortening
1/2 med. onion, chopped
1/2 small green pepper, chopped
1 cut up chicken

Saute onion and green pepper
Add salt, pepper and a 1/2 t. paprika
Add chicken, brown on all sides
Add 1/2 cup water
Cook for 1 1/2-2 hours

Mix 1/2 pint sour cream, 1 1/2 T. flour and 1/2 cup milk. Beat this mixture, well. Pour into chicken mixture and stir until smooth.

Dumplings
2 eggs
salt
Beat eggs, add enough flour to make very thick.
When smooth, add 2 T. soft butter. Blend. Cook small spoonfuls in salted, boiling water 10 minutes after they float to top.

mitmondol 09-13-2006 04:38 PM

Chicken paprikas is NOT a soup, nore is it a stew.
Paprikas in itself means a specific cooking method, so the name of the dish tells you how it is made. Other type of meats can be made paprikas with the same method.
Then you have gulyas and porkolt, all are specific cooking methods and can be used with different meats.
No fancy spices are used in paprikas dishes,most important ingredient is the paprika. Has to be very good quality (forget the grocery store boxes that have been sitting there for years and have no color or flavor).
Almost no additional liquid, or very little, the meat has to cook in its own juices and fat (you do not skin the chicken).
You should use lard or bacon drippings for sauteeing the onion, then add the meat and cook together.
When meat is browned, add s & p and sprinkle with sweet and hot paprika, off the heat. Paprika burns very quickly and becomes bitter and brown -no good!
Add 1-2 spoonful liquid (broth or even water) immediately and cook over low heat, covered, checking occasionally if liquid is needed.
Halfway through the cooking add a chopped, ripe tomato and a green pepper, cut into small pieces.(do NOT use bell pepper).
At the end of cooking, you should have a wonderful, red, fragrant gravy.
Now you can mix in the sour cream/flour mixture and just heat through.

It is usualy served with nokedli (Hu name for speatzle) and a good salad (most often cucumber salad)

Andy, that recipe sounds good, but NOT the real thing.

Seven S 09-13-2006 05:12 PM

may i recommend some egg pasta high-quality pappardelle made by De Cecco brand (Pasta All'Uovo)... little pricy but excellent

Andy M. 09-13-2006 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitmondol
Chicken paprikas is NOT a soup, nore is it a stew.
Paprikas in itself means a specific cooking method, so the name of the dish tells you how it is made. Other type of meats can be made paprikas with the same method.
Then you have gulyas and porkolt, all are specific cooking methods and can be used with different meats.
No fancy spices are used in paprikas dishes,most important ingredient is the paprika. Has to be very good quality (forget the grocery store boxes that have been sitting there for years and have no color or flavor).
Almost no additional liquid, or very little, the meat has to cook in its own juices and fat (you do not skin the chicken).
You should use lard or bacon drippings for sauteeing the onion, then add the meat and cook together.
When meat is browned, add s & p and sprinkle with sweet and hot paprika, off the heat. Paprika burns very quickly and becomes bitter and brown -no good!
Add 1-2 spoonful liquid (broth or even water) immediately and cook over low heat, covered, checking occasionally if liquid is needed.
Halfway through the cooking add a chopped, ripe tomato and a green pepper, cut into small pieces.(do NOT use bell pepper).
At the end of cooking, you should have a wonderful, red, fragrant gravy.
Now you can mix in the sour cream/flour mixture and just heat through.

It is usualy served with nokedli (Hu name for speatzle) and a good salad (most often cucumber salad)

Andy, that recipe sounds good, but NOT the real thing.

As with most traditional dishes, there is no one real thing. The recipes vary by region, town, household and cook. Your version sounds good also. I serve mine with spaetzle as well.

mitmondol 09-14-2006 10:56 AM

Andy, sorry, I have to disagree on this one!
Traditional means exactly that, there is a tradition how people make a certain dish.
Everyone can adjust to personal taste, but the basics have to remain the same -if you want to call the specific dish the same.
For instance cumin is unheard of in ANY paprikas, so is bay leaf and balsamic vinegar.
Don't feel offended, your recipe sounds terrific!
Just shoudn't be called something it is not.
I thought you guys might be interested in some info on this from "the lion's mouth", being Hungarian from Hu.
I will try your recipe, I'm sure it's delish!!
Now, happy cooking you all!

ronjohn55 09-14-2006 01:39 PM

Well, mom's recipe came straight from the old country, and it's soup like! :rofl:

(Mom got it from her mom, who got it from her mom - who was off the boat from the old country, who got it from her mom, and you get the picture...)

John

ChefJune 09-14-2006 02:32 PM

FWIW, Mitmondol (Adrienne) IS Hungarian, so maybe that will explain a bit how passionate she is about her native food. :smile:

Seven S 09-14-2006 02:40 PM

im certainly no expert in hungarian cuisine, but as a general rule, traditional and authentic recipes of most european countries call for a few number of ingredients, the more ingredients present, the better chance that one is deviating from the authentic recipe... think poverty, economics, product availability, food rationing, along those lines....

the one bit that i have gathered from "paprikas" is that traditionally it didnt contain tomatoes... but now, im not even sure thats true! :rofl:


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