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-   -   How long has the reuben sandwich been around? (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f104/how-long-has-the-reuben-sandwich-been-around-26312.html)

Gretchen 09-03-2006 08:47 AM

How long has the reuben sandwich been around?
 
I found out an interesting fact about the reuben sandwich--since BCEagle posted such. How long has it been around do you guys out there think?
I'll answer later. No fair googling.

Gretchen 09-03-2006 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Drama Queen
The literal translation of pannini means "little breads." Pannini is plural, one pannino two pannini. Whatever you call them, they're terrific.

"panini"--looks a little naked, but correct for the grill.

Any answers to my reuben question?

Andy M. 09-03-2006 10:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gretchen
...Any answers to my reuben question?


1928 is my guess.

Gretchen 09-03-2006 10:57 AM

Would have been mine too, but...........

Anyone else?

GB 09-03-2006 11:15 AM

I have seen many different dates.

kitchenelf 09-03-2006 11:26 AM

1892 :chef:

GB 09-03-2006 11:29 AM

I am going to split this off to it's own thread so we do not hijack BCEagle's original question.

FryBoy 09-03-2006 12:52 PM

It was named for Ruben, who was Adam and Eve's great-grandson. Ruben moved to Dusseldorf in 3942 B.C., where he opened a deli called The Hungry Hun. His signature sandwich, which utilized the local delicacies sauerkraut, rye bread, pickled beef, and mustard, was a huge success, along with his famous mammoth burgers.

I did NOT Google this!

Caine 09-03-2006 01:19 PM

If you have to ask how long it's been around, I wouldn't eat it. I'd throw it out!

Gretchen 09-03-2006 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FryBoy
It was named for Ruben, who was Adam and Eve's great-grandson. Ruben moved to Dusseldorf in 3942 B.C., where he opened a deli called The Hungry Hun. His signature sandwich, which utilized the local delicacies sauerkraut, rye bread, pickled beef, and mustard, was a huge success, along with his famous mammoth burgers.

I did NOT Google this!

I totally believe you when you say you didn't google this answer!!

Gretchen 09-03-2006 01:49 PM

As a hint, it was on foodtv yesterday.

Andy M. 09-03-2006 02:20 PM

Holy cow! Tell me you're not basing this on "facts" you heard on FoodTV!?:ohmy:

Gretchen 09-03-2006 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M.
Holy cow! Tell me you're not basing this on "facts" you heard on FoodTV!?:ohmy:

Then you can take whatever answer I give you all with a proverbial grain of fleur de sel.

C'mon--or are you ready.

kitchenelf 09-03-2006 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gretchen
Then you can take whatever answer I give you all with a proverbial grain of fleur de sel.

A statement from a true gourmet!! :chef:

I'm ready to hear the answer!

scott123 09-03-2006 05:00 PM

My non googled guess would be that the reuben was a 1900 turn of the century worlds fair type of thing (like the hot dog).

Chef_Jen 09-03-2006 06:05 PM

Well, I always thought it was named after a guy who had a weekly poker game and this was the sammy he served (ruben kulakofsky *again spelling is off)

1937 if im not mistaken... It was first on the menu at the Cornhusker hotel by a guy named Charles Schimmel (Spellin is prolly WAY off)

But thats what i remember anyway --what can i say im a geek

Anyway.. some ppl belive the myth that it was invented by Arnold ruben who has a deli in NYC circa 1914

however **here is where my geekyness really shows** This arnold dude claims that Chaplin and his "co-star" Anne Seelos walked into his shop and said "make me a sandwich" and ta da the ruben was born

Touching story really.....

EXCEPT

no record of this film has EVER been found...

my first theory is more supported then this guy from NY

Chef_Jen 09-03-2006 06:13 PM

okokok i did a culinary project on this in school *hangs head in shame*

Gretchen 09-03-2006 07:53 PM

Answer.










The sandwich won a cooking contest in the mid-50's and was adopted by some deli a year or so later and named a reuben. Amazing? Yes.

Andy M. 09-03-2006 09:15 PM

It appears Jim O'Conner(?) didn't read the research the Merriam-Webster folks did to authenticate the birthdate of the Reuben sandwich. Chef_Jen got most of the high points.

So now we have three versions of the story...

GB 09-03-2006 09:32 PM

Here is some additional info.


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