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Chief Longwind Of The North 03-01-2012 04:49 PM

Steak Fries
 
My DW has fallen in love with steak fries. And you know me, I have to make everything from scratch. So the question was, how do you get the fries cooked all the way through without overcooking the outside?

I found through trial and error that parboiling french fries before placing in hot oil give a superior texture to the standard fry, and refry technique. So I just took that a bit further. For steak fries, I cut large russets into 6 to 9 fries, depending on the size of the spud. I then place them in boiling water and cook for about five minutes. This cooks the potato through, without making them too soft to handle if overcooked, they break up when you try to remove them from the water). Place in hot oil and fry until they are just lightly browned. The outer surface is very nicely crisp, while the inside is fluffy, with full potato flavor. This also works with shorter potatoes that aren't just right for making french fries. I simply cube them into 1/4 inch cubes, then follow the same technique. But they are done through in about three minutes instead of 5.

When done, remove to paper towels and salt to your liking.

Give the technique a try and see what you think.:chef:

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 08:27 PM

2 frying sessions.

One at 315-325, just until they are able to be pierced with little resistance, drain and cool, SALT.

THEN fry at 350 until golden, crispy on the outside, fluffy in the middle.

Also, helps to prep the spuds a day in advance, and keep in cold water. helps remove some of the starch, and makes for a better texture in the end.

PrincessFiona60 03-01-2012 08:35 PM

I chill them after boiling, put them in the oil cold from the fridge.

DampCharcoal 03-01-2012 08:57 PM

What TATTRAT said. When it comes to taters, it's all about the par-cooking.

The damn things demand heavy attention, I've never met a potato that could be cooked for less than an hour.

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DampCharcoal (Post 1114222)
What TATTRAT said. When it comes to taters, it's all about the par-cooking.

The damn things demand heavy attention, I've never met a potato that could be cooked for less than an hour.

RIP Mitch Hedberg:
It takes forever to cook a baked potato in a conventional oven. Sometimes, I'll just throw one in there, even if I don't want one. By the time it's done, who knows?

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TATTRAT (Post 1114202)
2 frying sessions.

One at 315-325, just until they are able to be pierced with little resistance, drain and cool, SALT.

THEN fry at 350 until golden, crispy on the outside, fluffy in the middle.

That's pretty much the commonly accepted wisdom. I recall learning that from Julia Child's books. IIRC she was describing making potato pillows, but the wisdom is often repeated by all authorities: potato fries have to be fried twice.

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg (Post 1114236)
That's pretty much the commonly accepted wisdom. I recall learning that from Julia Child's books. IIRC she was describing making potato pillows, but the wisdom is often repeated by all authorities: potato fries have to be fried twice.


Heaven on Earth

https://ivyinnkitchen.files.wordpress...0220.jpg?w=700

Only maor difference is, a mandolin slice, first fry at 200, and then immediately into 335/350 to initiate the lift, and to set the potato as to not collapse.

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 09:45 PM

Oh yeah potato pillows! I recall these from one of my favorite and now defunct French bistros (here in L.A.). They served them as appetizers to all dinner customers.

I've made them a few times myself, but not with as photogenic results as your image.

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 09:51 PM

I can't take credit for that shot, all of mine are on the external HD, and not connected to the rig I am currently on, but they were the same. The potato just does wonderful, wonderful things, and is one of my all time faves to work with. My other favorite preparation, is the Hassleback Potato. Makes for a nice presentation, and if you layer in a little shaved garlic, and some cheese(something creamy) at the end, it's a one man marathon of crispy, yet soft potato-y goodness.

Rocklobster 03-01-2012 09:51 PM

Blanch, Blanch, Blanch. I cooked fresh cut fries in my place for years. As said, they need to be done in two stages. First blanch for about 4 minutes at about 325. Then drain and transfer to a container. I would use a cake pan or something like that. They will continue to cook through as they sit there. You can do this about an hour before you need them. Then cook again at 350 for about 5 minutes or however done you like them. I used to blanch about three busbins every morning and put lids on them and refrigerate. You can even refrigerate them and fry them the next day also.

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TATTRAT (Post 1114248)
My other favorite preparation, is the Hassleback Potato. Makes for a nice presentation, and if you layer in a little shaved garlic, and some cheese(something creamy) at the end, it's a one man marathon of crispy, yet soft potato-y goodness.

Hassleback Potato???

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg (Post 1114251)
Hassleback Potato???

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/_9qIas131rF...a_edited-1.jpg

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...7&ix=seb&ion=1


best way to do 'em, just for the sake of uniformity, is to take two long bamboo skewers, and run them lengthwise them of what will be the bottom of the potato. . .slice, as think as you can from the top, going down to the skewer(the skewer acts as a guard from slicing all the way through), repeat until the potato is all sliced. Rub with oil, sea salt, even some egg white for really crispy outsides, layer in shaved garlic between every few slices, bake until roasty toasty, and golden. The iner parts will still be soft and flaky, a little cheese and finish with some fresh herbs and a drizzle of olive oil, and delish.

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 10:03 PM

Ohhh! Potatoes Franconio! I do that all the time myself, from a famous and now defunct restaurant in L.A. (AKA potatoes franconia, not sure the derrivation.) And of course I'm in no position to argue authenticity or origination.

It's delicious and ridiculously easy to prepare too. :wink: Not fried but baked. Maybe roasted for those who want to argue terms...

I've seen versions of this recipe that don't mesh with your picture. Your picture is exactly what I'm referring to.

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg (Post 1114263)
Ohhh! Potatoes Franconio! I do that all the time myself, from a famous and now defunct restaurant in L.A.


lol, no, they were doing Hasselback potatoes, just by another name. I hope that they were delicious, at any rate. Was the restaurant named Franconio?

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 10:21 PM

Yes it was Franconio's. It was the same recipe. Your picture is proof. It's the same exact recipe, perhaps a signature item at Franconio's.

Hell, I don't have the entire history of cooking on my mind when I eat at a restaurant.

I can tell by looking at the picture that it's the exact same recipe. You know you have it right when the edges of the potatoes are browned and chewy. Put a whisk of butter on top, and parsley as your picture shows, and it's potato heaven!

I'm glad you shared this potato version with us. It's one of my most simplest and favorite ways to cook potatoes. Just slice them thin. The thinner the better, the thinner the more apt they are to brown on the edges. The crispy edges are the whole thing with this recipe. And it absolutely needs a butter whisking before cooking. To encourage browning.

I'm tempted to make them some time without skinning my potatoes. Some future day...

taxlady 03-01-2012 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TATTRAT (Post 1114248)
I can't take credit for that shot, all of mine are on the external HD, and not connected to the rig I am currently on, but they were the same. The potato just does wonderful, wonderful things, and is one of my all time faves to work with. My other favorite preparation, is the Hassleback Potato. Makes for a nice presentation, and if you layer in a little shaved garlic, and some cheese(something creamy) at the end, it's a one man marathon of crispy, yet soft potato-y goodness.

Just curious, where did you learn about Hasselback potatoes?

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 10:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taxlady (Post 1114274)
Just curious, where did you learn about Hasselback potatoes?


My mom use to do them,I remember them from when I was a kid. My mother was a Chef for years(a graduate of the Culinary institute of Switzerland), but these were always a "comfort" food, for her, and from what I know, it was a Swedish thing, my mother being Swed(I am Swed and Brit). The only difference, is my mom would peel the potatoes, I dont.

Greg Who Cooks 03-01-2012 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TATTRAT (Post 1114279)
The only difference, is my mom would peel the potatoes, I dont.

Excellent! I'd like to try unpeeled too! The best potato tastes are in the peel.

TATTRAT 03-01-2012 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg (Post 1114280)
Excellent! I'd like to try unpeeled too! The best potato tastes are in the peel.

Not only that, but most of the nutrients are in the peel. Also, can't seem to get the right amount of crunch with no peel in this application.

taxlady 03-01-2012 10:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TATTRAT (Post 1114279)
My mom use to do them,I remember them from when I was a kid. My mother was a Chef for years(a graduate of the Culinary institute of Switzerland), but these were always a "comfort" food, for her, and from what I know, it was a Swedish thing, my mother being Swed(I am Swed and Brit). The only difference, is my mom would peel the potatoes, I dont.

Swedish, that explains it. Danes like to make them for festive occasions. I think they would be even prettier with the skins on.


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