Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums

Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/)
-   Vegetables (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f18/)
-   -   Dauphinoise Potatoes (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f18/dauphinoise-potatoes-79512.html)

Gravy Queen 05-16-2012 09:13 AM

Dauphinoise Potatoes
 
Do you favour waxy or floury for this receep?

Andy M. 05-16-2012 09:16 AM

They would have to be waxy as a floury potato would fall apart.

Gravy Queen 05-16-2012 09:30 AM

Thanks Andy, see I'm reading conflicting recipes and cant remember for the life of me how I made them last time (short attention span!).

CWS4322 05-16-2012 09:31 AM

There is a trick for testing potatoes for starchiness:


Steven and Chris | Quick Kitchen Tips: Potatoes

It is tip #2.

Steve Kroll 05-16-2012 10:03 AM

I have to disagree about the type of potatoes. I've made this dish often and only use starchy potatoes for Dauphinoise. Russets work perfectly. This is one recipe where you actually want the starch, as it contributes to the overall creaminess.

This recipe looks like just what the doctor ordered.
BBC - Food - Recipes : Dauphinoise potatoes

Gravy Queen 05-16-2012 10:24 AM

Hmmm I am leaning towards floury, I think would like them to be more soft and yielding..

Bacardi1 05-16-2012 11:09 AM

I DEFINITELY vote for waxy potatoes for casseroles, gratins, scallops, etc., etc. Either reds, whites ("White Rose" is a favorite if you can find them), Yukon Golds, etc., etc.

Russets/Idahos, just in my opinion, don't become "creamy" - they turn into mashed potato mush. Were never meant to be used this way. I have well over 2 dozen recipes for various casseroled potatoes saved on my computer, & Lord only knows how many in cookbooks (just checked out a handful). Not ONE doesn't call for waxy or "boiling" potatoes.

But all cooking is governed by personal taste. Use "floury" potatoes if you must Gravy Queen - but do come back & tell us how you liked them in your recipe.

Steve Kroll 05-16-2012 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bacardi1 (Post 1139011)
Not ONE doesn't call for waxy or "boiling" potatoes.

The one I linked above calls for Russets.

You could also use an "in between" potato, such as Yukon Gold. Anthony Bourdain's recipe calls for those.

Bacardi1 05-16-2012 11:19 AM

Okay - that's ONE for Russets - lol!

Like I said - not trying to start an argument, just saying that 99.9% vote for waxy potatoes. They soften, but retain their integrity & don't dissolve.

And again like I said - personal preference rules. I'm not saying don't use them, but the OP asked for preference, & the majority is for waxy.

Hopefully the OP will come back & say how she enjoyed using Russets in a casserole.

Andy M. 05-16-2012 11:23 AM

GQ, I'd recommend you try one and see if it's as you remember. If not, it wil still be delicious then switch to the other next time. If yes, great!

Bolas De Fraile 05-16-2012 11:27 AM

Bacardi I grow 7 varieties of pots here in the UK for different uses. Charlottes are the waxy salads I grow and I would not use them for bolangere or dauphinoise. Steve K IMO is correct. Gravy I grow cara for baking and topping the flavor and lack of fall will suit the dauphin as would king eds, maris piper, desiree and roosters.:smile:

Harry Cobean 05-16-2012 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravy Queen (Post 1138954)
Do you favour waxy or floury for this receep?

roosters,mid way between waxy & floury & great flavour

Zhizara 05-16-2012 07:16 PM

Okay, I'm totally confused. What recipe?

Andy M. 05-16-2012 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zhizara (Post 1139206)
Okay, I'm totally confused. What recipe?

A recipe for the thread title dish. No actual recipe posted.

Greg Who Cooks 05-16-2012 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zhizara (Post 1139206)
Okay, I'm totally confused. What recipe?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Kroll (Post 1138973)
I have to disagree about the type of potatoes. I've made this dish often and only use starchy potatoes for Dauphinoise. Russets work perfectly. This is one recipe where you actually want the starch, as it contributes to the overall creaminess.

This recipe looks like just what the doctor ordered.
BBC - Food - Recipes : Dauphinoise potatoes

I'm with Steve on this one. The recipe is in many ways just a simplified version of my scalloped potatoes recipe which had its beginning in Rombauer & Becker's Joy of Cooking cookbook.

Russets work perfectly in my recipe which is just a superset of the one referenced in Steve's post. You know when you have the recipe exactly right when it shows browning (see the recipe site).

Furthermore I don't skin my potatoes. By the time they've fully cooked the skins are as tender as the rest, and add flavor. Some may not like the rustic appearance of the skins but I do.

Zhizara 05-16-2012 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1139219)
A recipe for the thread title dish. No actual recipe posted.

So, I'm still confused. I've never heard of Dauphinoise. Would somebody clue me in? I must have missed something.:ermm:

Greg Who Cooks 05-16-2012 07:52 PM

Zhizara I quoted Steve's post above for you, since his was the only actual recipe posted in the Topic. The link is BBC Food. It's probably a representative recipe.

Bolas De Fraile 05-17-2012 01:31 AM

Zhiz.This is a pretty standard recipe using your russets,I grate some nutmeg in mine and I dont use a bain-marie as I like a nice chewy bottom.
ieat learns to make dauphinoise potatoes - YouTube

Zhizara 05-17-2012 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile (Post 1139348)
Zhiz.This is a pretty standard recipe using your russets,I grate some nutmeg in mine and I dont use a bain-marie as I like a nice chewy bottom.
ieat learns to make dauphinoise potatoes - YouTube

Really? Bolas!:ohmy::lol:

Zhizara 05-17-2012 02:26 AM

Thanks, Andy & Greg. It was confusing that everyone seemed to know about it, yet I had never heard of it.

I've got a bunch of little red potatoes I need to use up. Hmmmm.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:19 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.