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-   -   Making Italian bread (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f23/making-italian-bread-88766.html)

callmaker60 01-24-2014 04:04 PM

Making Italian bread
 
After finally making a pizza dough I like, my next adventure is making Italian bread, I have found many recipe's, and that's my question, why so many recipe's. One says 2.5 cups of flour, the next one says 3 cups. Then it's some yeast then a full pack of yeast. I don't understand why the difference in recipe's with the same outcome????

Oldvine 01-24-2014 04:30 PM

The recipes won't have the exact same outcome. Different people recorded the recipes that work the best for them. The same thing happens with "American" bread recipes. There are 100s, if not thousands of bread recipes. It's the baker/cook's job to find the one that works best for them in their kitchen with their cooking/baking equipment.

Zagut 01-24-2014 06:13 PM

A half of a cup of flour isn't a big discrepancy. Humidity and other factors can make up that difference.

I am interested in your pizza dough recipe.

I'm always in search of pizza dough that's easy and good. :yum:

Rocklobster 01-24-2014 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oldvine (Post 1339212)
The recipes won't have the exact same outcome. Different people recorded the recipes that work the best for them. The same thing happens with "American" bread recipes. There are 100s, if not thousands of bread recipes. It's the baker/cook's job to find the one that works best for them in their kitchen with their cooking/baking equipment.

There you have it. Technique and timing is also important...

PrincessFiona60 01-24-2014 07:25 PM

AND humidity, altitude, season, temprature in the kitchen....temper of the baker, the oven temperament...

Aunt Bea 01-24-2014 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rocklobster (Post 1339237)
There you have it. Technique and timing is also important...

Amen!

I would watch a few videos from Jacques Pepin or another great chef and then give it a try and eventually make it your own.

I like Pepin because he keeps it simple, for the home cook.

How to Make Bread | Food & Wine

taxlady 01-24-2014 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aunt Bea (Post 1339252)
Amen!

I would watch a few videos from Jacques Pepin or another great chef and then give it a try and eventually make it your own.

I like Pepin because he keeps it simple, for the home cook.

How to Make Bread | Food & Wine

Thanks for the link. I watched the one about forming the bread. Okay, now I understand a bit better why my free form breads always oozed out to far to flat. :lol:

Roll_Bones 01-25-2014 11:45 AM

For some reason, no matter how hard I try, I cannot duplicate bakery quality bread.
Same with pizza dough.

It comes out good and everyone likes it. But I am very critical of my results and I am always trying to replicate what an Italian baker can do.
So far, I have failed in this attempt.

bakechef 01-25-2014 11:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roll_Bones (Post 1339366)
For some reason, no matter how hard I try, I cannot duplicate bakery quality bread.
Same with pizza dough.

It comes out good and everyone likes it. But I am very critical of my results and I am always trying to replicate what an Italian baker can do.
So far, I have failed in this attempt.

Bread is tricky. It is more about feel and instinct than the actual recipe in many cases.

Knowing that high hydration doughs will have a more coarse, open crumb like crusty artisan bread and that the finer texture comes from less hydration. For a high hydration artisan bread the no knead breads produce fantastic results.

I worked on my bread technique for quite a while, and I now know how to make it by feel and sight. I use my Kitchenaid for the mixing and kneading and can tell just by looking at it, if it's the right hydration.

Creating steam in the oven and cooking at a high temperature until it is completely baked (190-200 degrees) will insure a nice crusty bread.

Bread can be intimidating at first but the only way to get good at it is to keep researching and make a lot of it seeing how subtle changes effect the outcome.

jennyema 01-25-2014 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roll_Bones (Post 1339366)
For some reason, no matter how hard I try, I cannot duplicate bakery quality bread.
Same with pizza dough.

It comes out good and everyone likes it. But I am very critical of my results and I am always trying to replicate what an Italian baker can do.
So far, I have failed in this attempt.

Use the NYT no knead bread recipe. It's foolproof and easy.

taxlady 01-25-2014 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bakechef (Post 1339372)
Bread is tricky. It is more about feel and instinct than the actual recipe in many cases.

Knowing that high hydration doughs will have a more coarse, open crumb like crusty artisan bread and that the finer texture comes from less hydration. For a high hydration artisan bread the no knead breads produce fantastic results.

I worked on my bread technique for quite a while, and I now know how to make it by feel and sight. I use my Kitchenaid for the mixing and kneading and can tell just by looking at it, if it's the right hydration.

Creating steam in the oven and cooking at a high temperature until it is completely baked (190-200 degrees) will insure a nice crusty bread.

Bread can be intimidating at first but the only way to get good at it is to keep researching and make a lot of it seeing how subtle changes effect the outcome.

Great info BC. Is that in Celsius? 'Cause, it doesn't sound very high for Fahrenheit.

GotGarlic 01-25-2014 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taxlady (Post 1339437)
Great info BC. Is that in Celsius? 'Cause, it doesn't sound very high for Fahrenheit.

It's Fahrenheit.

PrincessFiona60 01-25-2014 05:29 PM

It's the temperature of the bread, not the oven.

taxlady 01-25-2014 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 (Post 1339456)
It's the temperature of the bread, not the oven.

:doh: D'oh!

bakechef 01-25-2014 07:21 PM

As PF said!

PrincessFiona60 01-25-2014 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bakechef (Post 1339483)
As PF said!

What did I win?!?:w00t2:

bakechef 01-25-2014 08:15 PM

my undying admiration!


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