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-   -   Roast potatoes (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f17/roast-potatoes-94642.html)

otuatail 12-24-2015 08:35 AM

Roast potatoes
 
I have never made roast potatoes. Ant bessy has always been the best approach. I have looked at James Martin as I watch him a lot. The question is what to use IF ANY?

“James Martin uses dripping or lard to make his favourite roast potatoes, but duck or goose fat works just as well.”

What is cheapest, best or use nothing?

What flavour if any is impacted.

puffin3 12-24-2015 08:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by otuatail (Post 1448312)
I have never made roast potatoes. Ant bessy has always been the best approach. I have looked at James Martin as I watch him a lot. The question is what to use IF ANY?

“James Martin uses dripping or lard to make his favourite roast potatoes, but duck or goose fat works just as well.”

What is cheapest, best or use nothing?

What flavour if any is impacted.

Use Yukon Gold potatoes. Wash them well and dry them well. Poke a sharp knife into the flesh a few times if you are roasting them whole. If you're quartering them put them all in a bowl and pour a little olive oil and a sprinkle of Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper on them to lightly coat and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar if you some at hand. Then onto a baking dish and into a 325 degree oven until they are fork tender.

GotGarlic 12-24-2015 09:52 AM

If you like crispy roasted potatoes, like I do, follow this recipe. Best ever: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...es-recipe.html

CWS4322 12-24-2015 10:35 AM

Do want whole potatoes or wedges? Duck fat is to die for with poatoes.

creative 12-24-2015 10:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CWS4322 (Post 1448341)
Do want whole potatoes or wedges? Duck fat is to die for with poatoes.

I agree.

otuatail 12-24-2015 12:03 PM

Ok I should have said I am in the UK never heard of Yukon Gold potatoes

We have baking potatoes, King Edward and Morris piper. (JM recommends MP for chips)


I wondered did any of these leave an after taste or flavour the potatoes. I got some pork dripping and it doesn't smell too bad. Will investigate this further

GotGarlic 12-24-2015 12:43 PM

Here's an article that compares different types of potatoes common in the UK and their characteristics when roasted. Give it a read and use the method that most appeals to you.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandst...-potato-recipe

di reston 12-24-2015 12:59 PM

Where ever you are, you need potatoes that are floury when you cook them.
Part cook them in water to start them off, and then start off the roasting by coating them in fat. When they are well coated, put them in the roasting tray and have the temperature high. Baste them frequently until they start to brown and then leave them to crisp up until they're ready. It's a bit of a knack, but once you've mastered it you'll always get good roasties,

Merry Christmas

di reston


Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde

tenspeed 12-24-2015 01:56 PM

I make roast potato wedges with red new potatoes. For medium size potatoes I'll cut them in eighths and toss with EVOO to coat. Put them on a baking sheet skin side down, sprinkle with a little salt if desired. Roast for 20 minutes or so at 350 - 375 until almost done, and then finish them under the broiler to brown them. Sometimes I'll sprinkle them with rosemary.

RPCookin 12-24-2015 03:04 PM

I've used russet, gold and red potatoes for dicing (about 2 to 2.5 cm dice) and roasting and all work just fine. I've never found any need to boil them first.

I've also never used any animal fats, just vegetable oil or a light olive oil. I usually use some sort of herb seasoning too (thyme and rosemary both work well, and if you have it in some form the UK, Montreal steak or chicken seasoning is excellent), along with coarse salt and black pepper.

I cut up the potatoes, toss them in a bowl with the oil and seasonings, then spread in a single layer on a baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray. I roast them in a medium hot to hot oven (200°-250°C) to make them crispy outside and tender and fluffy inside. Roast for about 30-45 minutes.

tenspeed 12-24-2015 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RPCookin (Post 1448364)

I cut up the potatoes, toss them in a bowl with the oil and seasonings, then spread in a single layer on a baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray.

Why bother with the cooking spray? My understanding is that cooking spray is oil diluted with other stuff. Tossing the potatoes with oil keeps them from sticking.

CharlieD 12-24-2015 04:59 PM

Olive oil, seasoning to taste. Cut into medium size chunks or if potato is small quarters. Main thing to use same kind potato and cut uniformly.


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Andy M. 12-24-2015 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tenspeed (Post 1448376)
Why bother with the cooking spray? My understanding is that cooking spray is oil diluted with other stuff. Tossing the potatoes with oil keeps them from sticking.


Logically you are correct but I have found through trial and error that it makes a difference with sticking.

RPCookin 12-24-2015 05:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tenspeed (Post 1448376)
Why bother with the cooking spray? My understanding is that cooking spray is oil diluted with other stuff. Tossing the potatoes with oil keeps them from sticking.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1448385)
Logically you are correct but I have found through trial and error that it makes a difference with sticking.

I was going to say the same thing. I once thought the same as Tenspeed, but in actual practice it does make a difference. I don't have what I would consider a logical explanation for it, but it seems to work.

creative 12-24-2015 05:58 PM

I forgot to buy duck fat (or goose fat) to roast my potatoes. However, I do have some organic coconut oil (solid at room temperature). A quick google search shows that these work with roast potatoes. Anyone here tried it? If so, were they crisp? Did they taste of coconut?

CharlieD 12-24-2015 08:17 PM

Unless you have some aversion to olive oil, I personally wouldn't use coconut oil.


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RPCookin 12-24-2015 08:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CharlieD (Post 1448411)
Unless you have some aversion to olive oil, I personally wouldn't use coconut oil.


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I agree. I don't know why it would have to be some sort of solid fat. It certainly doesn't have to be animal fat and I would never use coconut oil unless I was looking for that flavor.

Cooking Goddess 12-24-2015 09:09 PM

If you want to cut the roasting time but still have crispy oven potatoes, put the taw cubes in a bowl, add your oil or animal fat, seasonings, and mix thoroughly. Cover tightly with cling wrap and microwave until they are barely tender. Time depends amount, but I need about 4-5 minutes total for two very generous servings. About halfway through microwave time take the bowl out and gently toss the potatoes. If the wrap has bubbled up into a dome you can flip them as if it were a snow globe. ~ Spread out on your baking sheet and roast, flipping about halfway through. I have fully roasted potatoes about 30 minutes after putting them in the oven.

Cheryl J 12-24-2015 09:36 PM

CG, when I roast thick potato wedges, I also par cook them in the microwave. Works great. Fluffy insides and crispy outsides. :yum:

creative 12-25-2015 05:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CharlieD (Post 1448411)
Unless you have some aversion to olive oil, I personally wouldn't use coconut oil.


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I was thinking of using them both to make roast potatoes (50:50 ratio). Can you say why you wouldn't use coconut oil? The flavour?


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