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-   -   Easy Carrot Julienne (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f32/easy-carrot-julienne-99155.html)

Stock Pot 11-29-2017 02:29 PM

Easy Carrot Julienne
 
I had always julienned carrots the traditional way; cut rectangular planks out of the round carrot and cut those down to julienne.

Here is, I think, a better method I stumbled across. Cut the carrot on an extreme bias down the length of the carrot. This makes long oval planks that can then be easily julienned. Faster, less slicing and less waste.

GotGarlic 11-29-2017 02:44 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is the easiest way I've found.
Attachment 28551

msmofet 11-29-2017 03:45 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is what I use OXO Good Grips julienne peeler

Attachment 28553

GotGarlic 11-29-2017 05:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmofet (Post 1532998)
This is what I use OXO Good Grips julienne peeler

Attachment 28553

Oooohh, I like that! I might see about getting one in my Christmas stocking :wink:

tenspeed 11-29-2017 05:40 PM

I have one as well. It doesn't work as well as I hoped, but still the easiest way I have found. Pieces of the carrot break off and clog the peeler, and it's hard to find enough of the carrot to hold on to when nearing the end. Even with the negatives, it still gets regular use. I like adding carrots to cole slaw and salads.

Stock Pot 11-29-2017 06:26 PM

Well then, ditch your gadgets and try doing it by hand. Depend on your own knife skills.

Cooking Goddess 11-29-2017 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tenspeed (Post 1533005)
...Pieces of the carrot break off and clog the peeler, and it's hard to find enough of the carrot to hold on to when nearing the end....

That's the prep cook's portion. Ditch the tool and eat that last bit of carrot. :wink:

tenspeed 11-29-2017 07:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess (Post 1533009)
That's the prep cook's portion. Ditch the tool and eat that last bit of carrot. :wink:

That's what I do! :chef:

I snack on carrots

Cheryl J 11-29-2017 08:38 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I just use the larger hole side of my box grater. :smile: I know it's not 'julienned', but since I usually only make salad for one and prefer small slivers of carrot instead of chopped chunks, it works for me.

msmofet 11-29-2017 08:48 PM

I like to put Julienne carrot in my lo mein.

taxlady 12-01-2017 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stock Pot (Post 1532986)
I had always julienned carrots the traditional way; cut rectangular planks out of the round carrot and cut those down to julienne.

Here is, I think, a better method I stumbled across. Cut the carrot on an extreme bias down the length of the carrot. This makes long oval planks that can then be easily julienned. Faster, less slicing and less waste.

I agree, especially if I don't have one of the specialty tools or if I'm only doing a smallish quantity. I shared that tip a few years ago: Julienne a carrot (with pix)

Kayelle 12-01-2017 05:38 PM

I have that gadget like MsM and I use it a lot. I'll have to remember your slick tip Taxi and SP, as sometimes I'd like the pieces a little thicker than the gadget makes.

msmofet 12-02-2017 12:02 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by tenspeed (Post 1533005)
I have one as well. It doesn't work as well as I hoped, but still the easiest way I have found. Pieces of the carrot break off and clog the peeler, and it's hard to find enough of the carrot to hold on to when nearing the end. Even with the negatives, it still gets regular use. I like adding carrots to cole slaw and salads.

I use this to hold the carrot when it gets small. I also use it to make nice slices of tomatoes and onions etc.. I wish I could remember the name of this tool. I'd like to gift one but can't find it because I don't know the name. :sad::ohmy: (I've looked at every tool on the pampered chef site but can't find it)


Attachment 28579

Andy M. 12-02-2017 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmofet (Post 1533220)
...I wish I could remember the name of this tool. I'd like to gift one but can't find it because I don't know the name. :sad::ohmy: (I've looked at every tool on the pampered chef site but can't find it)


Attachment 28579

https://www.walmart.com/ip/New-Onion...dget/138015746

Sir_Loin_of_Beef 12-02-2017 01:22 PM

The easiest way I have found is,

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....8L._SX522_.jpg

taxlady 12-02-2017 03:35 PM

Sometimes I hold those little bit of veg with a fork for cutting them.

CWS4322 12-05-2017 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by msmofet (Post 1532998)
This is what I use OXO Good Grips julienne peeler

Attachment 28553

Love that tool.

CStanford 02-19-2018 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stock Pot (Post 1532986)
I had always julienned carrots the traditional way; cut rectangular planks out of the round carrot and cut those down to julienne.

Here is, I think, a better method I stumbled across. Cut the carrot on an extreme bias down the length of the carrot. This makes long oval planks that can then be easily julienned. Faster, less slicing and less waste.

These wouldn't be technically correct to a French standard (where most if not all of these knife cuts were standardized, if it matters to you). The method you describe is usually recommended for celery since it's hard to square it off like you can a carrot. Even then, the parts on the outside bias cut are discarded since they contain part of the oval.

CraigC 02-20-2018 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CStanford (Post 1541084)
These wouldn't be technically correct to a French standard (where most if not all of these knife cuts were standardized, if it matters to you). The method you describe is usually recommended for celery since it's hard to square it off like you can a carrot. Even then, the parts on the outside bias cut are discarded since they contain part of the oval.

Unless you haven't noticed, most of use are home cooks. Personally, I go by my own standards.:wink:

CStanford 02-20-2018 06:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigC (Post 1541155)
Unless you haven't noticed, most of use are home cooks. Personally, I go by my own standards.:wink:

Couple of things:

Cutting the carrot into a block before doing the julienne cuts lets you exclude the woody core of the carrot. Cutting on the bias will include the core, if there is one, and there usually is to some degree on a carrot of any size at all. Other cuts that include the core typically imply the carrot is there for flavoring only and will not be served with the finished dish.

Knife cuts aren't arbitrary or for looks only. The post was for those willing to look past the end of their own nose, learn something new, etc.

Cheers,

Charles


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