Anyone into grits?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Katie H

Site Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
16,588
Location
I live in the Heartland of the United States
explain how to add why. Better than oatmeal?
We really like grits. As a matter of fact, we had them/it for breakfast yesterday morning. We eat grits like hot cereal with milk and sugar. Sometimes I may add a pat of butter.

Grits can also be a great side dish. One of our favorites is Gouda Grits from an issue of 2015 of Southern Living magazine. Fantastic!
 

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,969
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
I know I've been told but for the life of me I can never remember. Is Grits the same as Cream of Wheat? I like Cream of Wheat. But don't often cook it. Usually eat it like I do oatmeal, just butter and brown sugar (or with molasses)
 

Katie H

Site Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
16,588
Location
I live in the Heartland of the United States
No, grits is/are not like cream of wheat. Cream of wheat is made from wheat, while grits is a corn-based product and is much coarser than cream of wheat, but can be cooked and eaten like cream of wheat but it takes a bit longer to reach the final product.
 

Cooking Goddess

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
16,099
Location
Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
explain how to add why. Better than oatmeal?
Not better really, just different. While you can have grits for breakfast, I think of it more as the starchy side at supper. Like steel cut oats, the longer you cook grits the smoother the texture becomes. I like laying down a bed of grits when I make Italian sausage with peppers and onions, or when I make some version of "shrimp and grits". If the grits are plain (that is, no cheese and cooked with just water and milk), I will pour the leftovers into a mini bread pan, chill, and use that for fried cornmeal with maple syrup for breakfast the next day.
 

KatyCooks

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,302
Location
Hampshire
I have always wondered what proper "Shrimp and Grits" would be like, but it sounds like "grits" are pretty stodgy! I can see that they form part of a carbohydrate (filler) part of a meal. From the descriptions here and online, I am not sold on them. (Even if they were available!)
 

dcSaute

Sous Chef
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
953
grits are a regular companion here, especially with salmon.
grits are like liver.
the discussion usually goes like:
"I hate liver."
"Oh, how was it done?"
"I've never eaten it."

there's a "thing" to grits, collard greens, turnips, , , and others.
people form opinions based on things they've heard . . . .
 

KatyCooks

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,302
Location
Hampshire
Oh, don't get me wrong, I would absolutely try grits! (I eat chicken liver, and other liver as long as it isn't cooked to leather consistency too.) Think we just agreed actually!

So, how are grits "well cooked"? I mean as an accompaniment to a meat or fish dish?
 
Last edited:

Janet H

Certifiable Executive Chef
Staff member
Joined
Jan 17, 2007
Messages
4,306
Location
Pacific NW
I love grits as a butter delivery system to accompany eggs, toast and grilled tomatoes. This is my favorite comfort food meal.

But there are rules....

  1. No instant grits. They are inferior, over-processed and the flavor is off, disappointing - bad.
  2. No reheated grits. They turn into a glooey mess.
  3. No grits from packets. These fail on count 1 PLUS they are salty.
  4. The pot they were cooked in must be scraped clean and put on to soak immediately upon emptying to prevent permanent grits-based spackle on the side of the pan..
 

KatyCooks

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
1,302
Location
Hampshire
I love grits as a butter delivery system to accompany eggs, toast and grilled tomatoes. This is my favorite comfort food meal.

But there are rules....

  1. No instant grits. They are inferior, over-processed and the flavor is off, disappointing - bad.
  2. No reheated grits. They turn into a glooey mess.
  3. No grits from packets. These fail on count 1 PLUS they are salty.
  4. The pot they were cooked in must be scraped clean and put on to soak immediately upon emptying to prevent permanent grits-based spackle on the side of the pan..
Now we're talking! Janet H, how do you cook your grits to go with your eggs and grilled tomatoes?
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
3,758
Location
Woodbury, NJ
I like grits, but something I do, to add some nutrients to them (most grains are better for us than grits), is add some steel cut oats to them. The texture is about the same, and the flavor of the grits still comes through - I don't really notice the flavor of the oats, even using 50/50, though I use maybe 1/2 c grits to 1/3 c oats.

Something I often do is make a chipotle mix as the water for it - I put a cup of water in the Vitamix, with a couple moritas or chipotles in it, and blend it smooth. I pour that one cup in the grits mix, then rinse the VM and lid out, using that water to add to the grits, add a little salt (cheese will add more salt, later), and cook 3 minutes under pressure, in the Instant Pot, and let the pressure release for about 15 min. I add cheese to the pot, and this makes a delicious snack, or side dish.
 

Janet H

Certifiable Executive Chef
Staff member
Joined
Jan 17, 2007
Messages
4,306
Location
Pacific NW
Lightly salted water at a rolling boil and then add grits. Read the recipe on the box or bag for exact measurements. I never measure, however and just eyeball this now.

Stir for a minute to assure there are no lumps and then turn down and cover the pot. They need to cook for about 15 minutes and then are best allowed to rest for a few more minutes.

The finished consistency should be thick-ish - like runny mashed potatoes. Serve with butter.

I also like cheese in grits. Tip: add cheese after grits have finished cooking and cooled for a few minutes. If you add cheese to boiling grits, the cheese will split and make the grits runny. They will never thicken.

The best grits imo are stone ground. Not too processed and not too finely ground. Despite what I've read online, Polenta and Grits are NOT the same. Polenta is finer and the variety of corn used differs.

Grits and corn meal are also not the the same product.

Meal:
Grits with butter
Eggs (any way you like them)
Fried, grilled or broiled tomatoes
Toast - preferably rye.
 

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,969
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
Goodness, this should be renamed Grits 101!

Thanks all for the input. Now I remember! My sister (OK/FL) loves them and keeps telling me to try them but then says - well be sure you don't buy just cornmeal, it's not the same. duh... well, we don't have anything labeled 'grits' on the shelves here, LOL.

And now I've remembered, think it was the Chief? a big discussion on the differences of maize, grits, cornmeal, fine, coarse, etc.
 

Kathleen

Cupcake
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
3,506
Location
Mid-Atlantic, USA
I love grits. Others in this house are not a fan. I like them in many way but, as others have pointed out, old-fashioned, stone-ground are the best. Personally, I like them in place of other starches in meals, am not as big of a fan with cheese in them, but will eat them in a bowl with milk (or cream), butter, and sugar or another kind of sweetner....like brown sugar or something of the sort. Most people who tell me they hate grits are not from "back home." So when I say, "That because you are not a Girl Raised In The South - yanno....GRITS?" It will cause controversey...like someone who isn't in our group shouting in the diner, "I was born in BackCreek, Georgia and I hate grits." To this, there is only one reply: "Oh....you never had mine." :LOL: If they continue, then go with the second reply, "Unless y'all have seven generations buried in your hometown cemetary, you cannot consider yourself a grit. Heck, just cause a cat has kittens in the oven doesn't make em biscuits." It is sad how well I can troll at times. Blame it on the sweet tea, cornbread and sunshine." ;)
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
3,758
Location
Woodbury, NJ
Polenta is definitely different from grits, but it's not all finely ground - there's a lot of coarsely ground out there, usually the preferred type, though it takes a long time to cook, much like old fashioned grits, compared to quick cook. While the treatment is different from the nixtamal of Mexico, it does give it a good flavor - the reason for the term "Hominy Grits" I used to see on most grits (is it still used in some places?). In one place nearby, a number of years ago (Bottom Dollar - Bought out around here), the yellow grits had none of the flavor, while the white did, but both called grits. The white grits had something on the bags about how the corn was treated, but nothing on the yellow - like it was polenta.

I don't know if they did this for this reason, or if it was just something lucky - the treatment of corn by alkali (lye, in the case of hominy, for grits) releases much of the niacin in corn, that is locked in something like polenta. Back when corn first made it to the new world, in many areas, where some of the people, since it was so cheap, it became their #1 grain, but many came down with pellagra, which they eventually realized was the niacin deficiency, caused by the excess use of corn. Not sure when the new world came up with the nixtamalization, that helps the flavor, as well as the nutrients!
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,710
Location
Southeast US
I grew up in the south. Grits are a staple. We only buy stone ground yellow grits. They are coarse ground. We never cook them in milk, we never put sugar or anything like it on them. Its sacrilegious.
Stone ground yellow grits cooked in water following the package instructions.
Then its butter and salt and pepper.
My wife is from SC and its hard to believe she puts sugar on them!? But she has always went against the grain.
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
27,098
Location
Southeastern Virginia
Back when corn first made it to the new world, in many areas, where some of the people, since it was so cheap, it became their #1 grain, but many came down with pellagra, which they eventually realized was the niacin deficiency, caused by the excess use of corn. Not sure when the new world came up with the nixtamalization, that helps the flavor, as well as the nutrients!
You mean the old world, ie, Europe. This happened in northern Italy.
I have always wondered what proper "Shrimp and Grits" would be like, but it sounds like "grits" are pretty stodgy! I can see that they form part of a carbohydrate (filler) part of a meal. From the descriptions here and online, I am not sold on them. (Even if they were available!)
Grits and polenta are similar enough to me that they can be used interchangeably, so if you like polenta, chances are you will like grits. Imo, they're best served with a tasty gravy or sauce, or cheesed up or with a lot of seasoning.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom