Best Knives I Can Get for Under $50?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

TripleB

Assistant Cook
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
16
Recap from my first post: I'm 43, just decided (after watching the food network for a year and a half) that it's time I started cooking some nice suppers for my family.

I'm looking to get decent quality knives at a pretty cheap price.

Are the following items the best I can do for under $50?

Victorinox 47520 Fibrox 8-Inch Chef's Knife $27 http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-475...=3MKPTD4TB6A20

Victorinox 47508 3-1/4-Inch Paring Knife $10 http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-475...=3MKPTD4TB6A20

AccuSharp 001 Knife Sharpener $9 http://www.amazon.com/AccuSharp-1-00...=3MKPTD4TB6A20

I don't intend to be a pro...I just want to be good enough to impress my family :chef:

Thanks for all your help.

TripleB
 

jennyema

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 1, 2002
Messages
10,520
Location
Boston and Cape Cod
Go here : Wusthof Trident Irregulars

Spend the $58 for a Wusthof 8 inch chefs knife knife. It's a cosmetic irregular, but who cares? It's a much better knife than the others you are considering. It will last forever.

And the seller, Cookware and More, is very reputable ... And may become your best friend.
 

Robo410

Executive Chef
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Aug 31, 2004
Messages
4,655
Location
SE Pennsylvania
foodies are probably more passionate about their knives than almost anything else. That said, the VIctorinox Forschner w/ fibrox handle is a good food service quality knife with good shapenability and edge holding qualities. Many pros use them. I have a set for when I travel and am always happy using them.
 

GB

Chief Eating Officer
Joined
Jul 14, 2004
Messages
25,510
Location
USA,Massachusetts
Go here : Wusthof Trident Irregulars

Spend the $58 for a Wusthof 8 inch chefs knife knife. It's a cosmetic irregular, but who cares? It's a much better knife than the others you are considering. It will last forever.
I second the $58 Wustof. This was my first decent knife (although I had the 10 inch). I got it for a wedding gift and loved it. I still have it and use it for cutting through big melons and things like that where a bit of heft comes in handy. I have since graduated to Japanese knives and and thrilled I did, but for your purposes those would be overkill right now and also out of your price range. The Wustof in the link Jenny gave you would be an excellent choice.
 

Bigjim68

Head Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
1,313
Location
Richmond, Va
I would have to second the Victorinox Forschner, although I like the wood handle version. I use the Edgemaker Pro on mine, and it does a good job with minimal learning curve and little time.

I would also look at a good smooth steel. The old F Dick's are among the best, and they are readily available on ebay.
 

bakechef

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 5, 2009
Messages
4,237
Location
North Carolina
Victorinox Forschner, or Dexter Russell are your best bets for low cost high quality knives. These knives are used in professional environments and really take a beating there. They are made to be comfortable to use (although this is subjective). I have Wusthoff knives but if I had to replace them it would be with one of these brands because they would easily fit into my budget and last a long time (the Wusthoff were a gift, couldn't have afforded this set myself)

If you have a restaurant supply store nearby go check out their knives, chances are they will have one or both of these brands.
 

violettedawn

Assistant Cook
Joined
Jan 6, 2011
Messages
20
Location
Prescott
I really like my Mercer, they are not expensive because the are manufactured in taiwan, keeping the price down. But they are made european style with German steel. The Santuko is a great starter knife (to each thier own, of course) it runs around 40 bucks. This is also the brand used on Airforce One...very sharp as well!
 

CharlieD

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
9,964
Location
USA,Minnesota
I'll second what Bill said. Dexter, makes very good commercial quality knives. They are inexpensive on line and even cheapper if yuo find a restaurant supplier in town. Half of my knives are Dexter Russel. They have different lines for all kind of taste. They stay fariloy sharp and are easy to sharpen if need to be. For the price though you can just keep buyin the new one efvery time it needs sharpening.
 

Rocklobster

Master Chef
Joined
Nov 10, 2010
Messages
6,669
Location
Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
If it is possible for you, you should source out a restaurant cutlery supplier. A company that rents and sharpens knives will also sell used, sharpened ones. I have bought a professional cleaver, 8 inch chef and a boning knife all for 30 bucks. They are as good as you will ever need.
 

moltogordo

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 29, 2010
Messages
40
Victorinox Forschner, or Dexter Russell are your best bets for low cost high quality knives. These knives are used in professional environments and really take a beating there. They are made to be comfortable to use (although this is subjective). I have Wusthoff knives but if I had to replace them it would be with one of these brands because they would easily fit into my budget and last a long time (the Wusthoff were a gift, couldn't have afforded this set myself)

If you have a restaurant supply store nearby go check out their knives, chances are they will have one or both of these brands.

I'll second this post. I know two professional chefs who use Victorinox Forschners. Their steel is excellent and, being a bit softer on the Rockwell scale than Wustoffs, are easier to keep steeled and edged.

I use a 12" Victorinox in my kitchen for cabbage, melons, etc. when I'm in need of a bigger knife than my 10" Sab. I also use the 12" Victorinox, and a 10" Victorinox, for cutting game (chops, roasts, etc) after I've made the largest cuts with my Old Hickory 14 and 16" butcher knives.

The composite handle doesn't squirrel all over in the blood and gore like the Sabs, Wustoffs, etc. The grips remain secure and firm in my hands in these messy situations. They'll do the same for you.

This goes double for large fish.
 
Last edited:

TripleB

Assistant Cook
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
Messages
16
Is a pairing knife with a standard blade or a serrated blade more useful in the home kitchen?

Thanks for all your input.

TripleB
 

GB

Chief Eating Officer
Joined
Jul 14, 2004
Messages
25,510
Location
USA,Massachusetts
For me a paring knife is more useful IMO. I use a serrated blade (aka bread knife) for slicing bread and pineapples and that is about it. And if I really had to then a sharp chefs knife could do both of those things just fine. A paring knife compliments a chefs knife for jobs that need detailed work or fine movements. When I used to have to cut grapes in half for my kids I would reach for my paring knife. Yes my chefs knife would have worked for that as well, but I was able to move faster with the paring knife.

Get your chefs knife first. You can always get a bread knife or paring knife later on down the road. For now, you should be able to use your chefs knife for just about everything and as you work you will start to realize when you would appreciate having a bread or paring knife. You will then know for you which will be more important.
 

Rob Babcock

Head Chef
Joined
Dec 23, 2004
Messages
1,337
Location
Big Sky Country
The Kuhn Rikon is a really nice little knife. It fits very securely in the supplied "saya" and holds an edge pretty well. It's definitely a cut above the Victorinox (no pun intended). That said both are nice little knives.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom