Bread baked with meat and cheese in it

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rodentraiser

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I was watching America's Test Kitchen the other day and they were talking about a bread made in Brooklyn that had salami, prosciutto, and I think Gouda cheese baked into it. I can't remember the name of it.

I thought I might be able to make something similar with ham and cheddar. As in folding small chunks of cheddar cheese into the bread dough and after adding sliced ham on top, folding the bread over so the ham was in the middle and then baking the whole thing.

I think what I'd end up with would be a sort of ham sandwich with no way to add mayo or mustard, but it might actually be good.

What do you guys think?
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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If the dough is rooled out into a rectangle, the size of a loaf pan, the filling, be it ham and cherse, or provolone/capicola, or even pastrami and swiss on rie bread dough, you have then only to fold the sides over top of the filling, brush with egg wash, place into your loaf pan, let rise, and bake. You coud even throw pizza toppings in it if you so desred.

If you lay your toppings onto the rolled out dough, and jelly-roll them in, you have stromboli. If you place the toppings on 1/2 of a rolled out circle of dough, fold the other half over, and crimp the edges, you have a calzone. Though procuito, provolone, and mazzarellay, all seasoned with gatlic, oregano, and pesto are standard for calzones, and stromboli, you can easily use any filling you want. Go big with shaved black truffles, aged gouda, and spinach if you want. Or maybe create a BLT with onions, or even shaved standing rib with cheddar cheese sauce, like a philly-steak. Imagination is your only limitation.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

Andy M.

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That's it!

I suppose I could just make the bread in the video, but I wanted to make something with ingredients I was a little more familiar with.

The process would be the same. There's no reason why you can't use cheddar and ham in place of the meat and cheese in their recipe.
 

rodentraiser

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I'll make it as soon as I get home and let you all know how it turns out.

Wait. So I guess I'm basically making a hot pocket.

mutter mutter mutter
 
Last edited:

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Since we don't have alcohol in the house, I'm wondering if a yeasty bigga, poolish, or even a slow rise of the bread dough would amp up the yeasty flavor as it sits in the refrigerator for a day or two. I'm not fond of the bitter component of beer either (hops). Any thoughts on this?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

GotGarlic

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Since we don't have alcohol in the house, I'm wondering if a yeasty bigga, poolish, or even a slow rise of the bread dough would amp up the yeasty flavor as it sits in the refrigerator for a day or two. I'm not fond of the bitter component of beer either (hops). Any thoughts on this?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I think either of those would work. The no-knead bread recipe I use gets more sourdough-like in flavor as it sits in the fridge for up to two weeks.
 

taxlady

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Since we don't have alcohol in the house, I'm wondering if a yeasty bigga, poolish, or even a slow rise of the bread dough would amp up the yeasty flavor as it sits in the refrigerator for a day or two. I'm not fond of the bitter component of beer either (hops). Any thoughts on this?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

The addition of the beer was just to make the process faster. It is a cheat to give the dough a yeasty flavour much faster than a slow rise.

Doing it with a slow rise and no beer is probably more "authentic".
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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I decided to change the recipe a bit, adding diastatic malt to the flour mix, and shelled pistachios to the finished dough, to go with the meat and cheese. I believe the pistachio flavor will compliment the other flavors. . I couldn't get capicola, and had no prosciutto. I did have ham. I diced the ham and placed it in a plastic bag with Italian Seasoning blend, and cayenne peppers to substitute. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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It's done, and came out very nice. It's moist, with a great crumb. not too soft, not too dense. You can taste a good, yeasty presence, with a touch of malt. The meats, and cheese really compliment this bread. Here are some pictures.

Oops! How'd that smoked turkey picture sneak in?:ohmy::ROFLMAO:

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

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