Buy early for Thanksgiving?

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cookiecrafter

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See many morning TV talk shows warning viewers to start buying Thanksgiving non-perishables "now." Do you think there will be shortages? Are prices going to skyrocket?
 

taxlady

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Well, I have everything I plan on getting for Thanksgiving. I live in Canada and we celebrate Thanksgiving on the second Monday of October, so this coming Monday.

But, there have been shortages of a variety of things, especially non-perishables off and on since the beginning of the pandemic. I have no idea if prices will skyrocket, but getting stuff that's important to you for Thanksgiving sooner rather than later, sounds like a good idea to me.
 

Sir_Loin_of_Beef

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Watch The Boy Who Cried Wolf | Prime Video
 

msmofet

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Egg prices have gone ridiculously high due to bird flu - $6.99 for 18. They were $2.99 a few weeks ago. I have turkey breast in the freezer.
 

Aunt Bea

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I have no doubt that prices will be significantly higher on some items.

I would wait and shop the specials even if it means tweaking the traditional menu a little.

I wouldn’t be put off by the doom and gloom of the media. We all have our own personal cost of living index and we only have to navigate the marketplace for enough food for a single holiday meal.

The notion of turkey on Thanksgiving is a fairly recent Madison Avenue invention.

Generations of Americans have cheerfully given thanks over dinners of roast chicken, pork, lasagna, chicken and dumplings, etc…
 

Andy M.

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. . .The notion of turkey on Thanksgiving is a fairly recent Madison Avenue invention.

Generations of Americans have cheerfully given thanks over dinners of roast chicken, pork, lasagna, chicken and dumplings, etc…
I feed a group of people (my family) a traditional turkey dinner. That "notion" spans four generations and any thought of my changing the menu has been met with a firm rejection.
 

Marlingardener

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Andy, when I was cooking Thanksgiving for my sister, brother-in-law, their three children, my mother and the two of us, turkey was always the star of the meal. This was from the mid-70's, not a new notion for us either.
I did draw the line at mashed sweet potatoes with gummy marshmallows on top, and the green bean casserole. I do have my standards!
Now that I am cooking for just the two of us, Thanksgiving is roast chicken. We actually prefer it.
I don't think there will be shortages of traditional foods, but that they will cost more as a result of transportation costs and out-and-out greed. I have stocked up on sweet potatoes and pie pumpkins (both that we don't grow) and most everything else will come from our garden. I'd advise everyone to buy now what you can in non-perishables, and we'll all enjoy a good Thanksgiving dinner.
 

GotGarlic

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The notion of turkey on Thanksgiving is a fairly recent Madison Avenue invention.
We can probably thank Sara Josepha Hale, poet, writer, first woman magazine editor in the United States, and author of Mary Had a Little Lamb, for that. For years, she promoted a national day of Thanksgiving, and in the 1860s, after President Lincoln agreed, she published recipes for the feast, including turkey. Wild turkeys were plentiful and easy to hunt at the time, and they provided enough food to feed the large families common then.

For more info: https://www.almanac.com/why-turkey-thanksgiving
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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If you've never tried them, mashed rutabagas with butter, a touch of brown sugar, and pepper were traditional at our Thanksgiving meal, and taste amazing. I do love a properly cooked sweet potato, or sweet potato casserole, but the stars of the show were the mashed potatoes, bread dressings, fresh made cranberry sauce, my Mom's Sea Breeze salad, and of course, a properly cooked turkey. Through the 60's on up, this was standard fare at my Mom's, and grandparents houses. My favorite side, the rutabaga, followed by the dressing. And a flavorful gravy was a must have as well. I also liked to bring both a roasted turkey, and goose to the meal. Roasted goose is amazing.

Tip: I've used my day old jack-o-lantern pumpkins to make pies. They were every bit as tasty as using pie pumpkins. Hubbard squash also works.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

taxlady

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We can probably thank Sara Josepha Hale, poet, writer, first woman magazine editor in the United States, and author of Mary Had a Little Lamb, for that. For years, she promoted a national day of Thanksgiving, and in the 1860s, after President Lincoln agreed, she published recipes for the feast, including turkey. Wild turkeys were plentiful and easy to hunt at the time, and they provided enough food to feed the large families common then.

For more info: https://www.almanac.com/why-turkey-thanksgiving
I have read something similar elsewhere. It said that turkey for Thanksgiving was meant to be an "every man" meal. That was why the bread stuffing, rather than an expensive, fancy, French, meat stuffing. Turkey was available for the hunting to most Americans back then. It was sort of an anti-snob feast.
 

cookiecrafter

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GeeGolly there are a lot of Thanksgiving origins. The one that I agreed on is this. There were many new imigrants mainly from Europe during the 1040's and they celebrated Thanksgiving different times of the year. To unite the United States more fully, Thanksgiving becamea recognized holiday in November.
 

GotGarlic

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GeeGolly there are a lot of Thanksgiving origins. The one that I agreed on is this. There were many new imigrants mainly from Europe during the 1040's and they celebrated Thanksgiving different times of the year. To unite the United States more fully, Thanksgiving becamea recognized holiday in November.
The 1040s?
 
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